Low-Maintenance Landscaping is Highly Recommended For Homeowners in Urban Areas, Drought Zones

Apr 11, 2001, 01:00 ET from The Home Depot

    ATLANTA, April 11 /PRNewswire/ -- Low-maintenance landscaping can be the
 key to unlocking your home's potential for outdoor beauty, especially when
 faced with lackluster landscaping conditions such as limited space, shading
 and lack of access to water.
     A growing trend for a number of homeowners, low-maintenance landscaping is
 ideal for people who have staked down their residence in urban areas, which
 typically feature tiny parcels of outdoor space-at best, small patios,
 courtyards or walkways.  In addition, many people, especially those living in
 the Southeast, Pacific Northwest and areas of Hawaii, are facing the
 likelihood of drought* again this year and need alternatives to traditional
 water-intensive landscaping designs.
     To incorporate this concept into your home's landscape, the gardening
 experts at The Home Depot(R) have the following tips to offer.
 
     Creating Visual Appeal With Pavers and Stamped Concrete
     Rather than using heavy-maintenance grass to cover the majority of the
 ground in the outdoor area, interlocking concrete pavers and stamped concrete,
 which looks just like pavers, can be used to create an exterior floor plan
 with visual appeal.
     Color and placement are two important criteria to consider when using
 pavers or stamped concrete.  The experts recommend choosing a color that will
 blend, not compete, with the home's exterior.  In general, products that are
 lighter in color than the home's exterior are the best option.  When arranging
 the pavers/stamped concrete be sure to keep the pattern simple, especially in
 narrow or small spaces.  Laying pavers/stamped concrete on a diagonal or in
 rows running across the area will help make smaller spaces seem larger.
 Another aesthetic idea to consider is leaving an area or two open within the
 pavers/stamped concrete to create a rock "pond"-a small space filled with
 pebbles and rocks.
 
     Select Native, Durable Plants
 Low-maintenance plants provide color and balance to homes that have walkways
 and patios predominately covered with pavers.  For example, a variety of
 shrubs, flowers and ground covers can be selected, including big blue liriope,
 francee hosta, weeping yaupon, fragrant tea olive, lenton rose, pansies and
 dwarf gardenia.
     When deciding between annuals and perennials, there are several items to
 consider.  Perennials are often stronger than annuals, therefore requiring
 less care.  In addition, while most perennials are trimmed down for the
 winter, they will return in the spring.  With proper care, they should bloom
 year after year, requiring less maintenance in the long run because they won't
 need to be replanted.  Annuals, on the other hand, provide temporary beauty-
 they will usually only last for a few months and then must be replaced.
 To achieve year-round color in a small space, the best advice is to plant both
 annuals and perennials in the same bed.  Use perennials as a backdrop and
 plant annuals in front so they can be easily swapped out when they cease to
 bloom.  This will create color throughout the year without the need to replant
 your entire bed every three to six months.
     The watering requirements for most perennials and annuals are the same,
 assuming you plant them in the appropriate location, depending on their sun
 and shading requirements.   In addition, grouping plants according to water
 needs minimizes the amount of irrigation needed.  It's also important to
 analyze the soil that will be used well before planting.  You may need to add
 amendments to help it hold water or drain better.
     Choosing the ideal plants for geographic locations varies across North
 America.  Experts in the garden center of your local Home Depot store can be
 the best source for determining what plants will work best for your outdoor
 area and climate.
 
     Take A Low-Key Approach to Caring for Your Landscape
     It's estimated that more plants are killed each year from too much water
 rather than from drought.  So, irrigate your landscape accordingly and water
 between 9 p.m. and 9 a.m. (unless there are specific watering restrictions in
 effect).  To help landscaping hold moisture in the soil, use mulches to
 insulate roots from severe temperatures and prohibit the growth of weeds,
 which will compete with plants for water.  Additionally, limit fertilization
 and pruning to prevent plants from demanding too much water.
 
     Accessorize:  Chimes, Fountains, Planters
     In small spaces, the right accessories can create a beautiful impact.
 For example, when space is at a premium, it's helpful to start by choosing a
 focal-point piece, such as a small water fountain or fragrant blooming tree,
 and then design around it.  Other great additions to small areas include
 miniature outdoor lights, whimsical chimes or smaller plants placed in
 colorful pots.  Also, remember to think about vertical options-hang plants
 where practical, grow ivy on a trellis and place it alongside a wall or add
 plants to wind around obelisks.
 
     *  According to recent data from the U.S. Climate Prediction Center, March
        storms have brought some relief to Southeastern drought areas, but much
        more rain is needed, especially in the Florida peninsula.  These rains
        will likely not end long-term drought anywhere in the Southeast.
        According to preliminary data, this was the second driest winter on
        record in the Pacific Northwest.  The protracted drought across central
        and southeastern Hawaii should continue through June.
 
 

SOURCE The Home Depot
    ATLANTA, April 11 /PRNewswire/ -- Low-maintenance landscaping can be the
 key to unlocking your home's potential for outdoor beauty, especially when
 faced with lackluster landscaping conditions such as limited space, shading
 and lack of access to water.
     A growing trend for a number of homeowners, low-maintenance landscaping is
 ideal for people who have staked down their residence in urban areas, which
 typically feature tiny parcels of outdoor space-at best, small patios,
 courtyards or walkways.  In addition, many people, especially those living in
 the Southeast, Pacific Northwest and areas of Hawaii, are facing the
 likelihood of drought* again this year and need alternatives to traditional
 water-intensive landscaping designs.
     To incorporate this concept into your home's landscape, the gardening
 experts at The Home Depot(R) have the following tips to offer.
 
     Creating Visual Appeal With Pavers and Stamped Concrete
     Rather than using heavy-maintenance grass to cover the majority of the
 ground in the outdoor area, interlocking concrete pavers and stamped concrete,
 which looks just like pavers, can be used to create an exterior floor plan
 with visual appeal.
     Color and placement are two important criteria to consider when using
 pavers or stamped concrete.  The experts recommend choosing a color that will
 blend, not compete, with the home's exterior.  In general, products that are
 lighter in color than the home's exterior are the best option.  When arranging
 the pavers/stamped concrete be sure to keep the pattern simple, especially in
 narrow or small spaces.  Laying pavers/stamped concrete on a diagonal or in
 rows running across the area will help make smaller spaces seem larger.
 Another aesthetic idea to consider is leaving an area or two open within the
 pavers/stamped concrete to create a rock "pond"-a small space filled with
 pebbles and rocks.
 
     Select Native, Durable Plants
 Low-maintenance plants provide color and balance to homes that have walkways
 and patios predominately covered with pavers.  For example, a variety of
 shrubs, flowers and ground covers can be selected, including big blue liriope,
 francee hosta, weeping yaupon, fragrant tea olive, lenton rose, pansies and
 dwarf gardenia.
     When deciding between annuals and perennials, there are several items to
 consider.  Perennials are often stronger than annuals, therefore requiring
 less care.  In addition, while most perennials are trimmed down for the
 winter, they will return in the spring.  With proper care, they should bloom
 year after year, requiring less maintenance in the long run because they won't
 need to be replanted.  Annuals, on the other hand, provide temporary beauty-
 they will usually only last for a few months and then must be replaced.
 To achieve year-round color in a small space, the best advice is to plant both
 annuals and perennials in the same bed.  Use perennials as a backdrop and
 plant annuals in front so they can be easily swapped out when they cease to
 bloom.  This will create color throughout the year without the need to replant
 your entire bed every three to six months.
     The watering requirements for most perennials and annuals are the same,
 assuming you plant them in the appropriate location, depending on their sun
 and shading requirements.   In addition, grouping plants according to water
 needs minimizes the amount of irrigation needed.  It's also important to
 analyze the soil that will be used well before planting.  You may need to add
 amendments to help it hold water or drain better.
     Choosing the ideal plants for geographic locations varies across North
 America.  Experts in the garden center of your local Home Depot store can be
 the best source for determining what plants will work best for your outdoor
 area and climate.
 
     Take A Low-Key Approach to Caring for Your Landscape
     It's estimated that more plants are killed each year from too much water
 rather than from drought.  So, irrigate your landscape accordingly and water
 between 9 p.m. and 9 a.m. (unless there are specific watering restrictions in
 effect).  To help landscaping hold moisture in the soil, use mulches to
 insulate roots from severe temperatures and prohibit the growth of weeds,
 which will compete with plants for water.  Additionally, limit fertilization
 and pruning to prevent plants from demanding too much water.
 
     Accessorize:  Chimes, Fountains, Planters
     In small spaces, the right accessories can create a beautiful impact.
 For example, when space is at a premium, it's helpful to start by choosing a
 focal-point piece, such as a small water fountain or fragrant blooming tree,
 and then design around it.  Other great additions to small areas include
 miniature outdoor lights, whimsical chimes or smaller plants placed in
 colorful pots.  Also, remember to think about vertical options-hang plants
 where practical, grow ivy on a trellis and place it alongside a wall or add
 plants to wind around obelisks.
 
     *  According to recent data from the U.S. Climate Prediction Center, March
        storms have brought some relief to Southeastern drought areas, but much
        more rain is needed, especially in the Florida peninsula.  These rains
        will likely not end long-term drought anywhere in the Southeast.
        According to preliminary data, this was the second driest winter on
        record in the Pacific Northwest.  The protracted drought across central
        and southeastern Hawaii should continue through June.
 
 SOURCE  The Home Depot

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