Making Radio and Television Journalists Even Faster...

Apr 19, 2001, 01:00 ET from GiAG

    LAS VEGAS, April 19 /PRNewswire/ -- NAB 2001, GiAG presents the
 i.BROADCAST(R) enterprise content management system for cross-media archiving,
 comprising everything from image similarity searching to face- and
 speech-recognition.
     An almost limitless number and variety of data, file formats and media are
 available either in analogue form or digitally on the Internet.
 In journalism, this means editors waste a lot of time every day searching for
 appropriate picture and text material on internal or external archives.
 This is especially the case if the data are stored decentrally or in
 duplicate.  Although using archive material would be cheaper, editors are
 often forced to produce film reports or sound recordings at considerable
 expense.
     The i.BROADCAST(R) enterprise content management system allows television
 stations, media providers and publishers to store, administer and quickly
 access files in more than 300 formats, no matter whether tapes arrive on
 Betacam SP, DVC-Pro or now on SDI-MPEG 2.  Once i.BROADCAST(R) has been
 installed, editors need only open the database, scan the news or archive
 material and cut in the desired segments online.
     To this end, they have a whole host of recognition tools at their
 disposal, and the system now also includes face- and speech-recognition
 software.  This means that all video material relating to a particular face or
 a certain word within an audio file can easily be searched for and displayed
 on screen for editing.
     This is because the modular system indexes, catalogues and archives all
 available video and audio data, documents, images, text and graphics in
 non-format-dependent data pools.  More than 300 file formats can thus be
 administered and edited without having to install the application with which
 the material was originally recorded.  Some 220 of these can be published on
 the Internet.
     Filters and databases are generated dynamically and are simple to adapt to
 individual working practices.  They can easily be changed during use.  Another
 advantage is that the company's data are accessible independent of the user's
 platform and location.  They can be found and edited quickly and
 simultaneously at all storage levels by any number of internal or external
 employees.
     The main emphasis of the system is on the indexing, storage and archiving
 of high-resolution streaming video and the migration of a variety of archive
 media onto digital, file-based formats; as well as associated e-business
 models such as video-on-demand, Web video applications (e.g. TC Webcutting) or
 global media-on-demand.
     The enterprise system can connect to a wide range of video hardware and
 supports both the integration of digital video servers, automation systems
 such as Louth and conventional tape archives.  Drives can be integrated either
 externally or in automated robot systems.  It also allows for a
 "soft migration" of everything from cassette-based material to
 digitally-stored media.  The system supports this process through
 database-based, time code-exact browsing material and automatically-extracted
 key scenes and cuts.  High-resolution video material is made available by
 means of robotics.
     GiAG can be found in the German pavilion, as part of a joint exhibition
 within the framework of the official presence of the Federal Republic of
 Germany, at the following location:  Sands Expo & Convention Center, Lower
 Level, (E-Topia Section), no. E2333/02.
 
 

SOURCE GiAG
    LAS VEGAS, April 19 /PRNewswire/ -- NAB 2001, GiAG presents the
 i.BROADCAST(R) enterprise content management system for cross-media archiving,
 comprising everything from image similarity searching to face- and
 speech-recognition.
     An almost limitless number and variety of data, file formats and media are
 available either in analogue form or digitally on the Internet.
 In journalism, this means editors waste a lot of time every day searching for
 appropriate picture and text material on internal or external archives.
 This is especially the case if the data are stored decentrally or in
 duplicate.  Although using archive material would be cheaper, editors are
 often forced to produce film reports or sound recordings at considerable
 expense.
     The i.BROADCAST(R) enterprise content management system allows television
 stations, media providers and publishers to store, administer and quickly
 access files in more than 300 formats, no matter whether tapes arrive on
 Betacam SP, DVC-Pro or now on SDI-MPEG 2.  Once i.BROADCAST(R) has been
 installed, editors need only open the database, scan the news or archive
 material and cut in the desired segments online.
     To this end, they have a whole host of recognition tools at their
 disposal, and the system now also includes face- and speech-recognition
 software.  This means that all video material relating to a particular face or
 a certain word within an audio file can easily be searched for and displayed
 on screen for editing.
     This is because the modular system indexes, catalogues and archives all
 available video and audio data, documents, images, text and graphics in
 non-format-dependent data pools.  More than 300 file formats can thus be
 administered and edited without having to install the application with which
 the material was originally recorded.  Some 220 of these can be published on
 the Internet.
     Filters and databases are generated dynamically and are simple to adapt to
 individual working practices.  They can easily be changed during use.  Another
 advantage is that the company's data are accessible independent of the user's
 platform and location.  They can be found and edited quickly and
 simultaneously at all storage levels by any number of internal or external
 employees.
     The main emphasis of the system is on the indexing, storage and archiving
 of high-resolution streaming video and the migration of a variety of archive
 media onto digital, file-based formats; as well as associated e-business
 models such as video-on-demand, Web video applications (e.g. TC Webcutting) or
 global media-on-demand.
     The enterprise system can connect to a wide range of video hardware and
 supports both the integration of digital video servers, automation systems
 such as Louth and conventional tape archives.  Drives can be integrated either
 externally or in automated robot systems.  It also allows for a
 "soft migration" of everything from cassette-based material to
 digitally-stored media.  The system supports this process through
 database-based, time code-exact browsing material and automatically-extracted
 key scenes and cuts.  High-resolution video material is made available by
 means of robotics.
     GiAG can be found in the German pavilion, as part of a joint exhibition
 within the framework of the official presence of the Federal Republic of
 Germany, at the following location:  Sands Expo & Convention Center, Lower
 Level, (E-Topia Section), no. E2333/02.
 
 SOURCE  GiAG