Marsha Linehan To Receive AFSP 1999 Research Award; Award Lecture To Highlight Suicide Prevention Efforts

May 04, 1999, 01:00 ET from American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

    NEW YORK, May 4 /PRNewswire/ -- The American Foundation for Suicide
 Prevention (AFSP) has announced that Dr. Marsha M. Linehan will receive its
 annual Lifesavers Research Award for her exemplary contribution to the
 prevention of suicide -- the 8th leading cause of death in the United States.
     Dr. Linehan, Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences
 at the University of Washington, will be honored by the Foundation for her
 large body of work focusing on suicide prevention, particularly her
 development of the Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) model, an acclaimed new
 four-stage behavioral treatment program for chronically suicidal
 individuals.
     The author of over a hundred articles, books and papers, Dr. Linehan has
 made major contributions to the field of suicide research.  She also serves as
 Director of the Behavioral Research and Therapy Clinics, a federally-funded
 program that evaluates the effectiveness of treatments for suicidal behavior,
 substance abuse and borderline personality disorder.
     "Marsha Linehan has pioneered a promising new treatment aimed at reducing
 suicidal behavior," explains Dr. Herbert Hendin, medical director of AFSP.
 "In addition, she has been a catalyst for suicide prevention research with her
 insistence on rigorous testing of the efficacy of all treatments."
     Dr. Linehan will speak at the Foundation's Annual Research Award Lecture
 on Monday, May 10, 1999 at 7 p.m. at the Lotos Club in New York City.  In her
 talk, On Creating a Life Worth Living: When Suicide Feels Like the Only
 Option, Dr. Linehan will discuss treatments designed to help suicidal
 individuals change long-term attitudes toward life.
     "Suicide is a response to a life that is believed to be unlivable," said
 Dr. Linehan.  "The solution is to make life worth living.  We can accomplish
 this goal by studying behavior and applying what we know to change behavior,
 steering an individual away from the urge to commit suicide."
     Linehan's lecture will be preceded by esteemed colleague, Dr. Craig
 Stockmeier, who will present vital new research findings on the role of
 serotonin levels and their relationship to suicide and depression in his talk,
 The Fall and Rise of Serotonin in Depression and Suicide.
     Dr. Stockmeier, Associate Professor of Psychology at Case Western Reserve
 University and University Hospitals of Cleveland, received a research grant
 from American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, which proved crucial to his
 important study on the role of serotonin in mood disorders and suicide.
 Stockmeier collected significant findings in brain chemical structures --
 findings that ultimately led to his receiving a major National Institute of
 Mental Health grant.  In turn, his research efforts have resulted in a major
 collection of brain tissue that has been critical to much recent biological
 research into psychiatric illness.
     Tickets to the Award Lecture are $35, and CME credit is available for
 medical professionals.  For more information on the Award Lecture and the
 Lifesavers Dinner the following evening, please contact the Foundation at
 212-363-3500 or at their web site http://www.afsp.org.
 
 

SOURCE American Foundation for Suicide Prevention
    NEW YORK, May 4 /PRNewswire/ -- The American Foundation for Suicide
 Prevention (AFSP) has announced that Dr. Marsha M. Linehan will receive its
 annual Lifesavers Research Award for her exemplary contribution to the
 prevention of suicide -- the 8th leading cause of death in the United States.
     Dr. Linehan, Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences
 at the University of Washington, will be honored by the Foundation for her
 large body of work focusing on suicide prevention, particularly her
 development of the Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) model, an acclaimed new
 four-stage behavioral treatment program for chronically suicidal
 individuals.
     The author of over a hundred articles, books and papers, Dr. Linehan has
 made major contributions to the field of suicide research.  She also serves as
 Director of the Behavioral Research and Therapy Clinics, a federally-funded
 program that evaluates the effectiveness of treatments for suicidal behavior,
 substance abuse and borderline personality disorder.
     "Marsha Linehan has pioneered a promising new treatment aimed at reducing
 suicidal behavior," explains Dr. Herbert Hendin, medical director of AFSP.
 "In addition, she has been a catalyst for suicide prevention research with her
 insistence on rigorous testing of the efficacy of all treatments."
     Dr. Linehan will speak at the Foundation's Annual Research Award Lecture
 on Monday, May 10, 1999 at 7 p.m. at the Lotos Club in New York City.  In her
 talk, On Creating a Life Worth Living: When Suicide Feels Like the Only
 Option, Dr. Linehan will discuss treatments designed to help suicidal
 individuals change long-term attitudes toward life.
     "Suicide is a response to a life that is believed to be unlivable," said
 Dr. Linehan.  "The solution is to make life worth living.  We can accomplish
 this goal by studying behavior and applying what we know to change behavior,
 steering an individual away from the urge to commit suicide."
     Linehan's lecture will be preceded by esteemed colleague, Dr. Craig
 Stockmeier, who will present vital new research findings on the role of
 serotonin levels and their relationship to suicide and depression in his talk,
 The Fall and Rise of Serotonin in Depression and Suicide.
     Dr. Stockmeier, Associate Professor of Psychology at Case Western Reserve
 University and University Hospitals of Cleveland, received a research grant
 from American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, which proved crucial to his
 important study on the role of serotonin in mood disorders and suicide.
 Stockmeier collected significant findings in brain chemical structures --
 findings that ultimately led to his receiving a major National Institute of
 Mental Health grant.  In turn, his research efforts have resulted in a major
 collection of brain tissue that has been critical to much recent biological
 research into psychiatric illness.
     Tickets to the Award Lecture are $35, and CME credit is available for
 medical professionals.  For more information on the Award Lecture and the
 Lifesavers Dinner the following evening, please contact the Foundation at
 212-363-3500 or at their web site http://www.afsp.org.
 
 SOURCE  American Foundation for Suicide Prevention