McAuliffe Challenges 'Partial' Recount Study Headline

'If All the Ballots Were Counted Gore Would Have Won Florida'



Apr 04, 2001, 01:00 ET from Democratic National Committee

    WASHINGTON, April 4 /PRNewswire/ -- DNC Chairman Terry McAuliffe took
 exception today to the Miami Herald/USA Today study of ballots from the
 Florida partial recount.  McAuliffe noted that the conclusion that Bush
 received the most votes in Florida is flawed in several ways.  Most
 importantly, they did not include a full, accurate tally of the votes in seven
 entire counties and even used different vote-counting standards within the
 same county.  Additionally, unlike the canvassing boards conducting the
 counts, the Miami Herald/USA Today count did not include overvotes -- ballots
 that upon examination by the local canvassing board could determine a clear
 Gore or Bush vote.  Nearly two-thirds of the overcount were not included.
     (Photo:  NewsCom:  http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20000107/DCF015 )
 
     "The same study that Republicans tout as proving that Bush really won
 Florida, also shows that if all the ballots were counted on election night, Al
 Gore would have won," McAuliffe said.  "And if all the people who intended to
 vote for Gore actually got to vote, without being confused or intimidated, the
 results would have been overwhelmingly in favor of Gore.  Any way you spin
 this data, you still come to the same conclusion, more must be done to protect
 our sacred right to vote and have our votes counted."
     McAuliffe also pointed to the results of the study to raise questions
 about George Bush's hard turn to the right and away from the center of
 American politics.
     "The only mandate that George Bush should have after a careful examination
 of the 2000 election results is a mandate for electoral reform," McAuliffe
 said.  "But the silence coming out of the Bush White House, his brother's
 Governor's mansion in Florida, and the halls of the Republican-controlled
 Congress couldn't be more deafening.  The Bush brothers are not only walking
 away from fixing the system that lead to such confusion and error, but now
 George Bush is cutting funding for electoral reform from the Federal Election
 Commission in his budget."
 
                       - ATTACHED INFO SHEET ON BUSH FEC CUTS-
 
      Bush Refused $5.5 Million the FEC Requested for Election Reform Efforts.
      Bush refused a request by the Federal Election Commission for $5.5
      million over two years that would be used for election reform efforts.
      The FEC requested the money for its Office of Election Administration,
      which is the only federal office with the ability to address how
      elections are run nationwide.  The FEC wanted the additional funding to
      develop standards to ensure that future elections are run properly,
      according to Republican FEC member David Mason, who chairs the
      Commission's budget committee.  "We have always wanted to take the next
      step but haven't had the money," Mason said.  The request for additional
      funds was rejected shortly after the FEC submitted it in February,
      according to Mason. (USA Today, 3/21/01)
 
      Additional FEC Funding Would Have Gone for Increased Staff and A Survey
      of Election Equipment and Local Administrators.  The additional funds
      requested by the FEC would have allowed the Commission to increase its
      staff charged with overseeing how elections are run and to conduct a
      survey of election mechanics across the country.  The FEC wanted to
      double the size of its five-person election administration office, which
      many election reform proposals in Congress want to use as the basis of a
      new agency to raise election standards nationwide.  The funding would
      have also allowed the FEC to undertake a "comprehensive census" of voting
      equipment used throughout the country and to survey local election
      administrators to develop a manual of the best practices for running
      elections. (USA Today, 3/21/01)
 
      Bush Administration Told FEC to Cut Its Budget by $1.4 Million.  In
      addition to rejecting the FEC's request for election reform funding, the
      Bush administration also told the Commission to cut $1.4 million from its
      budget.  The FEC requested $42.8 million in its budget request.
      According to Republican FEC member David Mason, the Commission needed the
      $42.8 million just to maintain its current level of services.  The FEC's
      budget request was reviewed by Vice President Cheney, OMB Director Mitch
      Daniels and Treasury Secretary Paul O'Neill. (USA Today, 3/21/01)
 
 

SOURCE Democratic National Committee
    WASHINGTON, April 4 /PRNewswire/ -- DNC Chairman Terry McAuliffe took
 exception today to the Miami Herald/USA Today study of ballots from the
 Florida partial recount.  McAuliffe noted that the conclusion that Bush
 received the most votes in Florida is flawed in several ways.  Most
 importantly, they did not include a full, accurate tally of the votes in seven
 entire counties and even used different vote-counting standards within the
 same county.  Additionally, unlike the canvassing boards conducting the
 counts, the Miami Herald/USA Today count did not include overvotes -- ballots
 that upon examination by the local canvassing board could determine a clear
 Gore or Bush vote.  Nearly two-thirds of the overcount were not included.
     (Photo:  NewsCom:  http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20000107/DCF015 )
 
     "The same study that Republicans tout as proving that Bush really won
 Florida, also shows that if all the ballots were counted on election night, Al
 Gore would have won," McAuliffe said.  "And if all the people who intended to
 vote for Gore actually got to vote, without being confused or intimidated, the
 results would have been overwhelmingly in favor of Gore.  Any way you spin
 this data, you still come to the same conclusion, more must be done to protect
 our sacred right to vote and have our votes counted."
     McAuliffe also pointed to the results of the study to raise questions
 about George Bush's hard turn to the right and away from the center of
 American politics.
     "The only mandate that George Bush should have after a careful examination
 of the 2000 election results is a mandate for electoral reform," McAuliffe
 said.  "But the silence coming out of the Bush White House, his brother's
 Governor's mansion in Florida, and the halls of the Republican-controlled
 Congress couldn't be more deafening.  The Bush brothers are not only walking
 away from fixing the system that lead to such confusion and error, but now
 George Bush is cutting funding for electoral reform from the Federal Election
 Commission in his budget."
 
                       - ATTACHED INFO SHEET ON BUSH FEC CUTS-
 
      Bush Refused $5.5 Million the FEC Requested for Election Reform Efforts.
      Bush refused a request by the Federal Election Commission for $5.5
      million over two years that would be used for election reform efforts.
      The FEC requested the money for its Office of Election Administration,
      which is the only federal office with the ability to address how
      elections are run nationwide.  The FEC wanted the additional funding to
      develop standards to ensure that future elections are run properly,
      according to Republican FEC member David Mason, who chairs the
      Commission's budget committee.  "We have always wanted to take the next
      step but haven't had the money," Mason said.  The request for additional
      funds was rejected shortly after the FEC submitted it in February,
      according to Mason. (USA Today, 3/21/01)
 
      Additional FEC Funding Would Have Gone for Increased Staff and A Survey
      of Election Equipment and Local Administrators.  The additional funds
      requested by the FEC would have allowed the Commission to increase its
      staff charged with overseeing how elections are run and to conduct a
      survey of election mechanics across the country.  The FEC wanted to
      double the size of its five-person election administration office, which
      many election reform proposals in Congress want to use as the basis of a
      new agency to raise election standards nationwide.  The funding would
      have also allowed the FEC to undertake a "comprehensive census" of voting
      equipment used throughout the country and to survey local election
      administrators to develop a manual of the best practices for running
      elections. (USA Today, 3/21/01)
 
      Bush Administration Told FEC to Cut Its Budget by $1.4 Million.  In
      addition to rejecting the FEC's request for election reform funding, the
      Bush administration also told the Commission to cut $1.4 million from its
      budget.  The FEC requested $42.8 million in its budget request.
      According to Republican FEC member David Mason, the Commission needed the
      $42.8 million just to maintain its current level of services.  The FEC's
      budget request was reviewed by Vice President Cheney, OMB Director Mitch
      Daniels and Treasury Secretary Paul O'Neill. (USA Today, 3/21/01)
 
 SOURCE  Democratic National Committee