Media Lead Sheet/April 30, 2001 issue (on newsstands Monday, April 23).

Apr 22, 2001, 01:00 ET from Newsweek

    NEW YORK, April 22 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- COVER: "The
 Next Frontiers: Business & Technology" (p. 43). While the economy may be
 uncertain and dot-coms come and go, technological advancements are creating
 new fields, new gadgets and new ways of doing business and whole new fields of
 employment. Newsweek's "The Next Frontiers" focuses on the business world and
 launches the first installment of a new series of four special reports by
 Newsweek correspondents focusing on how cutting edge technologies and
 inventions will transform the way we work and live.
     (Photo:  http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20010422/NEWSWEEK )
     "A New Brand of Tech Cites" (p. 44). Newsweek names ten hot tech cities
 which have built their new economies with hard work and innovation: Oakland,
 San Diego, Denver, Washington, D. C., Ventura, Akron, Huntsville, Dallas,
 Tulsa, and Omaha. Associate Editor Adam Rogers writes that the cities were
 chosen because they have combined a good base of science and technology
 companies with higher education institutions, and have governments that get
 and keep companies, all the while maintaining a good quality-of-life ratio.
     "Wanted: Hot Industry Seeks Supergeeks" (p. 54). The jobs of the future
 are also being shaped by technological advancements. The field of
 "bioinformatics," which scarcely existed a few years ago, is already a magnet
 for talented young workers. Technology Correspondent Brad Stone writes that
 proponents of the field claim it will change health care, by allowing
 pharmaceutical companies to shave years off the drug discovery process, and
 letting doctors tailor medicines to an individual's genetic makeup.
     "Your Next ... " (p. 60). Newsweek correspondents write about the next new
 gadgets in the works or on the horizon that will facilitate the work
 experience and even take it out of the office including: an "affinity
 matching" business card with infrared technology that signals people out to
 you at conferences with the same business interests; a voice-controlled
 virtual assistant; credit card-like passports that are swiped at customs
 checkpoints while a camera scans the eye's iris and if the scan matches the
 one on the passport you are allowed through.
     "Looking Beyond the Dot Bomb" (p. 62). For the class of 2001, last year's
 trendy business models have taken on new definitions: B2B stands for "back to
 banking" and B2C means "back to consulting." For those determined to work on
 the next frontiers of business and technology, the path is riskier. San
 Francisco Bureau Chief Karen Breslau reports that while no single technology
 has emerged to rival the Internet as the next "new thing," it's clear that a
 successful business model today is likely to be based on hard science or
 technology.
     "The Next New Thing" (p. 67). Microsoft has been working to create a
 computer that is as friendly and receptive as a piece of paper and if the
 company is correct, the Tablet PC, due out in 2002, could be a revolutionary
 device that actually replaces the laptop in your briefcase and the PC on your
 desk. Senior Editor Steven Levy says the prototype looks like a Palm Pilot on
 steroids, with a color screen and the Windows task bar on the bottom. A
 special digital pen allows you to write on it clipboard-style, annotate all
 your documents and stylus-surf the web, but you can also listen to music, read
 novels and dictate your own novel.
 
     NEWS OF THE WEEK: "Out of the Box" (p. 28). Billionaire media and finance
 baron Michael Bloomberg, who has yet to officially announce his candidacy for
 New York City mayor, says he won't take a salary if he should get the job.
 "I've thought about this, and if I were mayor, I wouldn't take more than $1 a
 year from the city," Bloomberg tells National Correspondent Matt Bai.
     "Aschroft's PR Offensive" (p. 30). Wounded by the harshness of his
 confirmation battle, Attorney General John Ashcroft has spent a lot of time
 lately making nice with his enemies, particularly African-Americans. Despite
 the PR campaign, inside the Justice Department Ashcroft has done little to
 mask his unapologetically conservative politics, reports Investigative
 Correspondent Michael Isikoff.
     "Oil is Thicker Than Blood" (p. 31). In exchange for allowing the sale of
 six million acres of gas-rich ocean floor in the eastern Gulf of Mexico near
 Florida, Commerce secretary Don Evans may rule to bar Chevron from drilling
 the closer-to-the-coast Destin Dome lease the company bought in 1988, sources
 tell Newsweek. The sale of "Lease 181" will allow new drilling for oil and
 gas, a move strongly opposed by President George W. Bush's brother and
 governor of Florida, Jeb Bush, who lobbied intently to block the sale, report
 Chief Political Correspondent Howard Fineman and White House Correspondent
 Martha Brant.
     "The New Face of the Left" (p. 32). The anti-globalization protesters in
 Quebec City seek not to win a rational debate, but to gain the world's
 attention and scare its governments, and they have succeeded once again,
 writes Newsweek International Editor Fareed Zakaria. We will now hear more
 calls from frightened free-traders for "dialogue," "cooperation" and the
 development of a "new framework" for trade, all code words for retreat and
 protectionism, which will only slow down growth and keep the third world
 firmly mired in poverty.
     "Comrade Putin Knows Best" (p. 34). The most striking thing about the
 silencing of Russia's last nationwide, independent broadcast station last week
 was the unconcern that greeted it. Moscow Bureau Chief Christian Caryl reports
 that what's happening in Russia today resembles something much closer to
 home -- the old Soviet Union and just a little over a year after President
 Vladimir Putin's election, Russia is witnessing an extraordinary revival of
 Soviet-era habits, reflexes, and rhetoric.
     "Mr. Tito Prepares for Takeoff" (p. 40). NASA and other partners in the
 International Space Station have dropped their objections to accommodate
 California financier Dennis Tito in his quest to become the first tourist in
 space. Tito tells Senior Editor David France that NASA changed its mind after
 he agreed to sign a contract accepting responsibility for anything he broke in
 space. And after paying the Russians $20 million for the privilege, Tito is
 expected to rocket off to space next week, if all goes according to plan.
 
     ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT: "American Beauty" (p. 72). For a window on more
 tasteful times, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York is throwing open
 Jackie Kennedy's closets with an exhibit called "Jacqueline Kennedy: The White
 House Years." As Senior Editor Cathleen McGuigan writes, don't look for Jackie
 O at the Met, in big sunglasses and capri pants. Instead, you'll see Mrs.
 Kennedy -- and a powerful sense of official history shapes the show.
     "Where the Action Isn't" (p. 75).  With recent films from Kevin Costner,
 Arnold Schwarzenegger, John Travolta and Sylvester Stallone playing to mostly
 empty theaters, the box office reaper could soon terminate these and other
 sagging legends. Senior Writer John Horn writes that many of them are now
 searching for ways to attract missing moviegoers, but in a bizarre reversal of
 the supply-and-demand curve, many of the fading stars are still charging
 Mercedes rates even as their movies perform like rent-a-wrecks and that's
 making studios fretful about casting them.
 
                      MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT - Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X77818005
 
 

SOURCE Newsweek
    NEW YORK, April 22 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- COVER: "The
 Next Frontiers: Business & Technology" (p. 43). While the economy may be
 uncertain and dot-coms come and go, technological advancements are creating
 new fields, new gadgets and new ways of doing business and whole new fields of
 employment. Newsweek's "The Next Frontiers" focuses on the business world and
 launches the first installment of a new series of four special reports by
 Newsweek correspondents focusing on how cutting edge technologies and
 inventions will transform the way we work and live.
     (Photo:  http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20010422/NEWSWEEK )
     "A New Brand of Tech Cites" (p. 44). Newsweek names ten hot tech cities
 which have built their new economies with hard work and innovation: Oakland,
 San Diego, Denver, Washington, D. C., Ventura, Akron, Huntsville, Dallas,
 Tulsa, and Omaha. Associate Editor Adam Rogers writes that the cities were
 chosen because they have combined a good base of science and technology
 companies with higher education institutions, and have governments that get
 and keep companies, all the while maintaining a good quality-of-life ratio.
     "Wanted: Hot Industry Seeks Supergeeks" (p. 54). The jobs of the future
 are also being shaped by technological advancements. The field of
 "bioinformatics," which scarcely existed a few years ago, is already a magnet
 for talented young workers. Technology Correspondent Brad Stone writes that
 proponents of the field claim it will change health care, by allowing
 pharmaceutical companies to shave years off the drug discovery process, and
 letting doctors tailor medicines to an individual's genetic makeup.
     "Your Next ... " (p. 60). Newsweek correspondents write about the next new
 gadgets in the works or on the horizon that will facilitate the work
 experience and even take it out of the office including: an "affinity
 matching" business card with infrared technology that signals people out to
 you at conferences with the same business interests; a voice-controlled
 virtual assistant; credit card-like passports that are swiped at customs
 checkpoints while a camera scans the eye's iris and if the scan matches the
 one on the passport you are allowed through.
     "Looking Beyond the Dot Bomb" (p. 62). For the class of 2001, last year's
 trendy business models have taken on new definitions: B2B stands for "back to
 banking" and B2C means "back to consulting." For those determined to work on
 the next frontiers of business and technology, the path is riskier. San
 Francisco Bureau Chief Karen Breslau reports that while no single technology
 has emerged to rival the Internet as the next "new thing," it's clear that a
 successful business model today is likely to be based on hard science or
 technology.
     "The Next New Thing" (p. 67). Microsoft has been working to create a
 computer that is as friendly and receptive as a piece of paper and if the
 company is correct, the Tablet PC, due out in 2002, could be a revolutionary
 device that actually replaces the laptop in your briefcase and the PC on your
 desk. Senior Editor Steven Levy says the prototype looks like a Palm Pilot on
 steroids, with a color screen and the Windows task bar on the bottom. A
 special digital pen allows you to write on it clipboard-style, annotate all
 your documents and stylus-surf the web, but you can also listen to music, read
 novels and dictate your own novel.
 
     NEWS OF THE WEEK: "Out of the Box" (p. 28). Billionaire media and finance
 baron Michael Bloomberg, who has yet to officially announce his candidacy for
 New York City mayor, says he won't take a salary if he should get the job.
 "I've thought about this, and if I were mayor, I wouldn't take more than $1 a
 year from the city," Bloomberg tells National Correspondent Matt Bai.
     "Aschroft's PR Offensive" (p. 30). Wounded by the harshness of his
 confirmation battle, Attorney General John Ashcroft has spent a lot of time
 lately making nice with his enemies, particularly African-Americans. Despite
 the PR campaign, inside the Justice Department Ashcroft has done little to
 mask his unapologetically conservative politics, reports Investigative
 Correspondent Michael Isikoff.
     "Oil is Thicker Than Blood" (p. 31). In exchange for allowing the sale of
 six million acres of gas-rich ocean floor in the eastern Gulf of Mexico near
 Florida, Commerce secretary Don Evans may rule to bar Chevron from drilling
 the closer-to-the-coast Destin Dome lease the company bought in 1988, sources
 tell Newsweek. The sale of "Lease 181" will allow new drilling for oil and
 gas, a move strongly opposed by President George W. Bush's brother and
 governor of Florida, Jeb Bush, who lobbied intently to block the sale, report
 Chief Political Correspondent Howard Fineman and White House Correspondent
 Martha Brant.
     "The New Face of the Left" (p. 32). The anti-globalization protesters in
 Quebec City seek not to win a rational debate, but to gain the world's
 attention and scare its governments, and they have succeeded once again,
 writes Newsweek International Editor Fareed Zakaria. We will now hear more
 calls from frightened free-traders for "dialogue," "cooperation" and the
 development of a "new framework" for trade, all code words for retreat and
 protectionism, which will only slow down growth and keep the third world
 firmly mired in poverty.
     "Comrade Putin Knows Best" (p. 34). The most striking thing about the
 silencing of Russia's last nationwide, independent broadcast station last week
 was the unconcern that greeted it. Moscow Bureau Chief Christian Caryl reports
 that what's happening in Russia today resembles something much closer to
 home -- the old Soviet Union and just a little over a year after President
 Vladimir Putin's election, Russia is witnessing an extraordinary revival of
 Soviet-era habits, reflexes, and rhetoric.
     "Mr. Tito Prepares for Takeoff" (p. 40). NASA and other partners in the
 International Space Station have dropped their objections to accommodate
 California financier Dennis Tito in his quest to become the first tourist in
 space. Tito tells Senior Editor David France that NASA changed its mind after
 he agreed to sign a contract accepting responsibility for anything he broke in
 space. And after paying the Russians $20 million for the privilege, Tito is
 expected to rocket off to space next week, if all goes according to plan.
 
     ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT: "American Beauty" (p. 72). For a window on more
 tasteful times, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York is throwing open
 Jackie Kennedy's closets with an exhibit called "Jacqueline Kennedy: The White
 House Years." As Senior Editor Cathleen McGuigan writes, don't look for Jackie
 O at the Met, in big sunglasses and capri pants. Instead, you'll see Mrs.
 Kennedy -- and a powerful sense of official history shapes the show.
     "Where the Action Isn't" (p. 75).  With recent films from Kevin Costner,
 Arnold Schwarzenegger, John Travolta and Sylvester Stallone playing to mostly
 empty theaters, the box office reaper could soon terminate these and other
 sagging legends. Senior Writer John Horn writes that many of them are now
 searching for ways to attract missing moviegoers, but in a bizarre reversal of
 the supply-and-demand curve, many of the fading stars are still charging
 Mercedes rates even as their movies perform like rent-a-wrecks and that's
 making studios fretful about casting them.
 
                      MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT - Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X77818005
 
 SOURCE  Newsweek