Media Lead Sheet/April 9, 2001 issue (on newsstands Monday, April 2).

Apr 01, 2001, 00:00 ET from Newsweek

    COVER: 'Painkillers.  Vicodin and OxyContin: Hot Drugs That Offer Relief
 -- And Danger' (p. 44).  Part of the appeal of prescription drugs is that
 users think of them as "safe."  They're FDA approved, easy to take on the sly
 and they don't have the same stigma as illegal drugs.  General Editor Claudia
 Kalb reports that in recent years, emergency room data shows that some brand
 names of painkillers have seen dramatic spikes in abuse.  And there is no
 typical abuser: police departments say they have seen every variety, from
 teenagers to stay-at-home moms to executives.
     "How One Town Got Hooked" (p. 48).  OxyContin is by far the most powerful
 of addictive painkillers.  The drug offers pain relief three times longer than
 earlier versions, but when crushed and snorted, it's a huge, narcotic rush to
 the brain.  National Correspondent Debra Rosenberg chronicles the effect
 OxyContin has had on the tiny town of Hazard, Ky., population 5,500, where in
 the past year, local officials say, the drug has swept through the town,
 wrecking lives and destroying families.
     (Photo:  http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20010331/HSSA009 )
 
     NATIONAL AFFAIRS: "Outcry Over a Killer's Story" (p. 23).  A controversial
 new book about Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh has sparked a public
 outcry, with some people saying the authors are exploiting the tragedy.  The
 two reporters who wrote the book tell Senior Writer Tom Morganthau that the
 book was never meant "to hurt people in Oklahoma City." Newsweek exclusively
 excerpts the book in the current issue.
     "A Beltway Bungee Jump" (p. 30).  After a key test vote last week on
 campaign finance reform, leading man Sen. John McCain of Arizona was feeling
 superstitious.  "I won't pop any corks until I'm standing in the Rose Garden,"
 he tells Senior Editor Jonathan Alter, who details the final showdown leading
 up to this week's pivotal vote in the Senate on the controversial bill.
 
     INTERNATIONAL: "In Milosevic's Wake" (p. 32).  After the 10-year reign of
 the man known as "the butcher of the Balkans," Slobodan Milosevic's legacy is
 vast and appalling: a quarter of a million dead in Bosnia alone and more than
 3 million refugees.  Correspondent-at-Large Rod Nordland reports on the tense
 weekend showdown that ended with Milosevic's arrest, bringing him one step
 closer to the justice he deserves.
     "'It's Out of Control'" (p. 35).  Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak tells
 Contributing Editor Lally Weymouth in an exclusive interview that he is
 "working with the Americans to find a way to resume negotiations" between the
 Israelis and the Palestinians, as violence rages there daily. "I am
 encouraging [Palestinian leader Yasir] Arafat to continue negotiations,"
 Mubarak says, adding that Arafat can "stop some" of the violence, "but it is
 out of control."
 
     BUSINESS: "Bedtime for Bezos?" (p. 36).  Amazon.com CEO Jeff Bezos tells
 Technology Correspondents Steven Levy and Brad Stone that the company will
 turn what he calls "pro forma operating" profit by the fourth quarter of this
 year and he wants to assure his 30 million customers that he's not running out
 of money.  "The stock is not the business," he says, adding that,  "The
 business is in better shape than it has ever been," he adds, claiming that
 profit will come simply by better execution.
     "An Amazonian Survival Strategy" (p. 40).  Wall Street Editor Allan Sloan
 crunches Amazon's numbers and writes that the company's road to profitability
 may not be so easy.  "By my math, which Amazon doesn't seriously dispute, it
 ran through $350 million to $400 million of cash last year.  If you assume
 Amazon continues to bleed cash at a $400 million annual rate, I give Amazon
 about 18 months before its cash on hand dwindles to levels low enough to make
 its suppliers restive.  Amazon says my $400 million burn rate is way high," he
 writes.
 
     "Jesse and Al's Food Fight" (p. 41).  In a dispute involving
 minority-owned franchises for Burger King, Rev. Al Sharpton and his mentor,
 Rev. Jesse Jackson, are squaring off over the best way to solicit money from
 corporate America, report Investigative Correspondent Mark Hosenball and
 Assistant Managing Editor Evan Thomas.  The dispute comes at an awkward time
 for Jackson, whose finances have been closely scrutinized since he disclosed
 that the mother of his illegitimate child received a generous payoff when she
 left one of his several organizations.
     "Can America Assimilate" (p. 42).  The latest census appears to have been
 a consciousness-raising exercise -- at least for the press, writes
 Contributing Editor Robert Samuelson, who says we may be glimpsing a new
 attitude toward immigration.  To benefit from immigration, he writes, we may
 need a little less of it, because people need time to adjust and American
 institutions can be overwhelmed by too many newcomers.
 
     SOCIETY: "Ready for His Close-Up" (p. 54).  Arguably baseball's best short
 stop ever, Alex Rodriguez made history when he signed a 10-year, $252 million
 contract with the Texas Rangers, the biggest in sports, write National
 Correspondent Allison Samuels and National Sports Correspondent Mark Starr.
 And America is now discovering what Hispanics have known since A-Rod was 17
 and baseball's number one draft pick.  "I've been Michael Jordan in Latin
 countries for years," says Rodriguez.
 
     ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT: "Wall of Soul" (p. 56).  Soul artist Jill Scott is
 part of a generation of 'Neo-Soul' artists who are reinventing a classic
 tradition while still 'keeping it real' for black audiences.  Samuels writes
 that the artist has sold 2 million copies of her new album, "Who Is Jill
 Scott?" by identifying and targeting her core urban audience before venturing
 into the mainstream.
     "May the Farce Be With Them" (p. 58).  With more than two weeks until its
 official Broadway opening, Mel Brooks's musical version of his 1968 classic
 film farce "The Producers" is playing to sold-out preview audiences.  Senior
 Editor Cathleen McGuigan talks to the two stars of the show, Nathan Lane and
 Matthew Broderick.
 
     The Motley Fool Investor Guide: "Weathering The Storm" (p. 60).  With the
 downturn in the stock market accelerating this year, investors are asking
 themselves which of the old rules still apply: buy and hold, buy what you
 know, buy blue chips. "As we emerge from technotopia, we have a right to feel
 disoriented," writes The Motley Fool's Bill Barker.  "Where, are we? What went
 wrong? When are we getting our money back? And most of all: can it be that
 some of the old rules were right after all?"
     "What Goes Down Must Come Up" (p. 62).  The 'buy and hold' strategy is one
 in which investors buy stocks in a company with compelling growth prospects
 and hold on to them for a number of years.  But in today's volatile market,
 writes The Motley Fool's Brian Graney, for this strategy to work, investors
 must be able to confront risk and learn how to deal with it throughout the
 investment process.
     "Inside the 'Circle of Competence'" (p. 65). One golden rule that hasn't
 changed, is 'buy what you know.'  "Understanding a company means knowing how
 it makes money, what its challenges and competitors are, and how to tell if
 and when it's making the grade," writes The Motley Fool's Dave
 Marino-Nachison.
 
 
 

SOURCE Newsweek
    COVER: 'Painkillers.  Vicodin and OxyContin: Hot Drugs That Offer Relief
 -- And Danger' (p. 44).  Part of the appeal of prescription drugs is that
 users think of them as "safe."  They're FDA approved, easy to take on the sly
 and they don't have the same stigma as illegal drugs.  General Editor Claudia
 Kalb reports that in recent years, emergency room data shows that some brand
 names of painkillers have seen dramatic spikes in abuse.  And there is no
 typical abuser: police departments say they have seen every variety, from
 teenagers to stay-at-home moms to executives.
     "How One Town Got Hooked" (p. 48).  OxyContin is by far the most powerful
 of addictive painkillers.  The drug offers pain relief three times longer than
 earlier versions, but when crushed and snorted, it's a huge, narcotic rush to
 the brain.  National Correspondent Debra Rosenberg chronicles the effect
 OxyContin has had on the tiny town of Hazard, Ky., population 5,500, where in
 the past year, local officials say, the drug has swept through the town,
 wrecking lives and destroying families.
     (Photo:  http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20010331/HSSA009 )
 
     NATIONAL AFFAIRS: "Outcry Over a Killer's Story" (p. 23).  A controversial
 new book about Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh has sparked a public
 outcry, with some people saying the authors are exploiting the tragedy.  The
 two reporters who wrote the book tell Senior Writer Tom Morganthau that the
 book was never meant "to hurt people in Oklahoma City." Newsweek exclusively
 excerpts the book in the current issue.
     "A Beltway Bungee Jump" (p. 30).  After a key test vote last week on
 campaign finance reform, leading man Sen. John McCain of Arizona was feeling
 superstitious.  "I won't pop any corks until I'm standing in the Rose Garden,"
 he tells Senior Editor Jonathan Alter, who details the final showdown leading
 up to this week's pivotal vote in the Senate on the controversial bill.
 
     INTERNATIONAL: "In Milosevic's Wake" (p. 32).  After the 10-year reign of
 the man known as "the butcher of the Balkans," Slobodan Milosevic's legacy is
 vast and appalling: a quarter of a million dead in Bosnia alone and more than
 3 million refugees.  Correspondent-at-Large Rod Nordland reports on the tense
 weekend showdown that ended with Milosevic's arrest, bringing him one step
 closer to the justice he deserves.
     "'It's Out of Control'" (p. 35).  Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak tells
 Contributing Editor Lally Weymouth in an exclusive interview that he is
 "working with the Americans to find a way to resume negotiations" between the
 Israelis and the Palestinians, as violence rages there daily. "I am
 encouraging [Palestinian leader Yasir] Arafat to continue negotiations,"
 Mubarak says, adding that Arafat can "stop some" of the violence, "but it is
 out of control."
 
     BUSINESS: "Bedtime for Bezos?" (p. 36).  Amazon.com CEO Jeff Bezos tells
 Technology Correspondents Steven Levy and Brad Stone that the company will
 turn what he calls "pro forma operating" profit by the fourth quarter of this
 year and he wants to assure his 30 million customers that he's not running out
 of money.  "The stock is not the business," he says, adding that,  "The
 business is in better shape than it has ever been," he adds, claiming that
 profit will come simply by better execution.
     "An Amazonian Survival Strategy" (p. 40).  Wall Street Editor Allan Sloan
 crunches Amazon's numbers and writes that the company's road to profitability
 may not be so easy.  "By my math, which Amazon doesn't seriously dispute, it
 ran through $350 million to $400 million of cash last year.  If you assume
 Amazon continues to bleed cash at a $400 million annual rate, I give Amazon
 about 18 months before its cash on hand dwindles to levels low enough to make
 its suppliers restive.  Amazon says my $400 million burn rate is way high," he
 writes.
 
     "Jesse and Al's Food Fight" (p. 41).  In a dispute involving
 minority-owned franchises for Burger King, Rev. Al Sharpton and his mentor,
 Rev. Jesse Jackson, are squaring off over the best way to solicit money from
 corporate America, report Investigative Correspondent Mark Hosenball and
 Assistant Managing Editor Evan Thomas.  The dispute comes at an awkward time
 for Jackson, whose finances have been closely scrutinized since he disclosed
 that the mother of his illegitimate child received a generous payoff when she
 left one of his several organizations.
     "Can America Assimilate" (p. 42).  The latest census appears to have been
 a consciousness-raising exercise -- at least for the press, writes
 Contributing Editor Robert Samuelson, who says we may be glimpsing a new
 attitude toward immigration.  To benefit from immigration, he writes, we may
 need a little less of it, because people need time to adjust and American
 institutions can be overwhelmed by too many newcomers.
 
     SOCIETY: "Ready for His Close-Up" (p. 54).  Arguably baseball's best short
 stop ever, Alex Rodriguez made history when he signed a 10-year, $252 million
 contract with the Texas Rangers, the biggest in sports, write National
 Correspondent Allison Samuels and National Sports Correspondent Mark Starr.
 And America is now discovering what Hispanics have known since A-Rod was 17
 and baseball's number one draft pick.  "I've been Michael Jordan in Latin
 countries for years," says Rodriguez.
 
     ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT: "Wall of Soul" (p. 56).  Soul artist Jill Scott is
 part of a generation of 'Neo-Soul' artists who are reinventing a classic
 tradition while still 'keeping it real' for black audiences.  Samuels writes
 that the artist has sold 2 million copies of her new album, "Who Is Jill
 Scott?" by identifying and targeting her core urban audience before venturing
 into the mainstream.
     "May the Farce Be With Them" (p. 58).  With more than two weeks until its
 official Broadway opening, Mel Brooks's musical version of his 1968 classic
 film farce "The Producers" is playing to sold-out preview audiences.  Senior
 Editor Cathleen McGuigan talks to the two stars of the show, Nathan Lane and
 Matthew Broderick.
 
     The Motley Fool Investor Guide: "Weathering The Storm" (p. 60).  With the
 downturn in the stock market accelerating this year, investors are asking
 themselves which of the old rules still apply: buy and hold, buy what you
 know, buy blue chips. "As we emerge from technotopia, we have a right to feel
 disoriented," writes The Motley Fool's Bill Barker.  "Where, are we? What went
 wrong? When are we getting our money back? And most of all: can it be that
 some of the old rules were right after all?"
     "What Goes Down Must Come Up" (p. 62).  The 'buy and hold' strategy is one
 in which investors buy stocks in a company with compelling growth prospects
 and hold on to them for a number of years.  But in today's volatile market,
 writes The Motley Fool's Brian Graney, for this strategy to work, investors
 must be able to confront risk and learn how to deal with it throughout the
 investment process.
     "Inside the 'Circle of Competence'" (p. 65). One golden rule that hasn't
 changed, is 'buy what you know.'  "Understanding a company means knowing how
 it makes money, what its challenges and competitors are, and how to tell if
 and when it's making the grade," writes The Motley Fool's Dave
 Marino-Nachison.
 
 
 SOURCE  Newsweek