MTA Board Approves 2001 Long Range Transportation Plan; Plan Provides 25-Year Blueprint for Transportation Development

Apr 26, 2001, 01:00 ET from Los Angeles Metropolitan Transportation Authority

    LOS ANGELES, April 26 /PRNewswire/ -- The MTA Board of Directors today
 approved the MTA's 2001 Long Range Transportation Plan for Los Angeles County
 with the provision that amendments to the plan could be introduced at the next
 regular Board meeting on May 24, 2001.  The plan will guide transportation
 development in the county through the year 2025, a period in which the county
 is expected to experience unprecedented growth.
     The population of Los Angeles County is projected to grow by almost three
 million people to nearly 13 million people in the next 25 years.  The Long
 Range Transportation Plan (LRTP) examines the impacts this growth will have on
 the mobility of the county, which includes increasing demand on streets,
 highways, buses and trains, and it recommends what could be done to address
 those impacts within anticipated revenues ("recommended plan"), as well as
 what could be done if additional revenues become available ("strategic plan").
     The recommended plan provides a balanced transportation program with a
 strong emphasis on public transit to meet the expected growth in travel.
 Components of the recommended plan's transportation program include:
 
     -- completion of the Eastside and Pasadena light rail projects
     -- two busways for the San Fernando Valley
     -- a fixed guideway project, bus or light rail, from downtown to West Los
        Angeles
     -- 22-line expansion of the successful Metro Rapid Bus program
     -- freeway widenings, extensions and gap closures
     -- freeway interchange improvements
     -- expansion of the HOV (carpool) lane network
     -- construction of additional soundwalls
     -- expansion of the Metrolink commuter rail system
     -- completion of a countywide traffic signal coordination system
 
     The Long Range Transportation Plan also encourages more ridesharing,
 walking and bike riding, telecommuting and improved management of truck
 traffic.
     The LRTP's recommended plan is built on what the MTA believes are
 realistic financial projections of revenues from federal, state and local
 taxes and subsidies, as well as revenues from passenger fares, advertising,
 real estate rentals and other miscellaneous sources.  Because most funding
 decisions are made years ahead, the MTA estimates that $106.4 billion will be
 available for local transportation projects through 2025.
     Since $95.2 billion of this sum already is committed, only $11.2 billion
 in uncommitted funding will be available for new transportation projects
 through 2025, most of that after 2010.
     The Long Range Transportation Plan also spells out a strategic plan, which
 includes other transportation projects and services the MTA believes are of
 regional importance, but which would require new sources of revenue to
 complete.  In fact, there is a projected shortfall of more than $20 billion
 between the $106.4 billion available under current funding scenarios and what
 is needed to address additional impacts that population growth will have on
 the transportation system.
     Transportation projects and services identified in the LRTP's strategic
 plan include:
 
     -- an additional 14 Metro Rapid Bus lines
     -- extensions and/or upgrades to transit corridor projects in the
        constrained plan
     -- extension of the Pasadena Blue Line from Sierra Madre Villa (Pasadena)
        to Claremont
     -- completion of countywide system of HOV (carpool) lanes
     -- additional freeway gap closures
     -- additional community transit services (i.e., shuttles, local
        circulators)
     -- additional Metrolink expansion
 
     MTA Board approval of the Long Range Transportation Plan means the plan
 will now be submitted to the Southern California Association of Governments
 (SCAG), the designated planning organization for a six-county region, for
 inclusion in SCAG's Regional Transportation Plan (RTP).
     The RTP demonstrates how Los Angeles, Orange Ventura, Riverside, San
 Bernardino and Imperial counties will meet federal mandates, particularly air
 quality requirements.  Only projects and programs included in the RTP are
 eligible for federal funding.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X14388443
 
 

SOURCE Los Angeles Metropolitan Transportation Authority
    LOS ANGELES, April 26 /PRNewswire/ -- The MTA Board of Directors today
 approved the MTA's 2001 Long Range Transportation Plan for Los Angeles County
 with the provision that amendments to the plan could be introduced at the next
 regular Board meeting on May 24, 2001.  The plan will guide transportation
 development in the county through the year 2025, a period in which the county
 is expected to experience unprecedented growth.
     The population of Los Angeles County is projected to grow by almost three
 million people to nearly 13 million people in the next 25 years.  The Long
 Range Transportation Plan (LRTP) examines the impacts this growth will have on
 the mobility of the county, which includes increasing demand on streets,
 highways, buses and trains, and it recommends what could be done to address
 those impacts within anticipated revenues ("recommended plan"), as well as
 what could be done if additional revenues become available ("strategic plan").
     The recommended plan provides a balanced transportation program with a
 strong emphasis on public transit to meet the expected growth in travel.
 Components of the recommended plan's transportation program include:
 
     -- completion of the Eastside and Pasadena light rail projects
     -- two busways for the San Fernando Valley
     -- a fixed guideway project, bus or light rail, from downtown to West Los
        Angeles
     -- 22-line expansion of the successful Metro Rapid Bus program
     -- freeway widenings, extensions and gap closures
     -- freeway interchange improvements
     -- expansion of the HOV (carpool) lane network
     -- construction of additional soundwalls
     -- expansion of the Metrolink commuter rail system
     -- completion of a countywide traffic signal coordination system
 
     The Long Range Transportation Plan also encourages more ridesharing,
 walking and bike riding, telecommuting and improved management of truck
 traffic.
     The LRTP's recommended plan is built on what the MTA believes are
 realistic financial projections of revenues from federal, state and local
 taxes and subsidies, as well as revenues from passenger fares, advertising,
 real estate rentals and other miscellaneous sources.  Because most funding
 decisions are made years ahead, the MTA estimates that $106.4 billion will be
 available for local transportation projects through 2025.
     Since $95.2 billion of this sum already is committed, only $11.2 billion
 in uncommitted funding will be available for new transportation projects
 through 2025, most of that after 2010.
     The Long Range Transportation Plan also spells out a strategic plan, which
 includes other transportation projects and services the MTA believes are of
 regional importance, but which would require new sources of revenue to
 complete.  In fact, there is a projected shortfall of more than $20 billion
 between the $106.4 billion available under current funding scenarios and what
 is needed to address additional impacts that population growth will have on
 the transportation system.
     Transportation projects and services identified in the LRTP's strategic
 plan include:
 
     -- an additional 14 Metro Rapid Bus lines
     -- extensions and/or upgrades to transit corridor projects in the
        constrained plan
     -- extension of the Pasadena Blue Line from Sierra Madre Villa (Pasadena)
        to Claremont
     -- completion of countywide system of HOV (carpool) lanes
     -- additional freeway gap closures
     -- additional community transit services (i.e., shuttles, local
        circulators)
     -- additional Metrolink expansion
 
     MTA Board approval of the Long Range Transportation Plan means the plan
 will now be submitted to the Southern California Association of Governments
 (SCAG), the designated planning organization for a six-county region, for
 inclusion in SCAG's Regional Transportation Plan (RTP).
     The RTP demonstrates how Los Angeles, Orange Ventura, Riverside, San
 Bernardino and Imperial counties will meet federal mandates, particularly air
 quality requirements.  Only projects and programs included in the RTP are
 eligible for federal funding.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X14388443
 
 SOURCE  Los Angeles Metropolitan Transportation Authority