NAHJ Alarmed That Percentage of Hispanic Journalists Working at Dailies Dropped Slightly in 2000

Apr 03, 2001, 01:00 ET from National Association of Hispanic Journalists

    WASHINGTON, April 3 /PRNewswire/ -- The National Association of Hispanic
 Journalists is alarmed that the percentage of Latino journalists working at
 English-language daily newspapers dropped slightly in 2000, according to the
 American Society of Newspaper Editors' annual newsroom survey released April
 3.
     ASNE's survey found that Latinos made up only 3.66 percent of all newsroom
 employees in 2000.  In 1999, Latinos made up 3.68 percent of all newsroom
 employees.  The percentage of journalists working in the nation's newsrooms
 who are Hispanic has increased only 2.5 percent between 1982 and 2000 (see
 chart below).
     Meanwhile, as the latest Census figures show, the U.S. Hispanic
 population, excluding Puerto Rico, has dramatically increased from 6.4 percent
 in 1982 (14.6 million) to 13.0 percent (35.3 million) in 2000.
     Overall, the survey found that the percentage of journalists of color
 working at daily newspapers fell from 11.85 percent in 1999 to 11.64 percent
 last year.  It is the first time that the percentage of journalists of color
 working at daily newspapers fell since ASNE began conducting its survey 23
 years ago.
     "This year's survey, more than ever, reveals that the industry is in
 crisis," said NAHJ President Cecilia Alvear, a producer at NBC News.  "We
 believe the lack of Latinos and other journalists of color working at daily
 newspapers continues to undercut the industry's credibility with the
 communities they serve.  It is clear the industry has not made diversity,
 including intellectual diversity, a priority."
     The ASNE survey found that 600 journalists of color were hired into their
 first full-time job last year.  But 698 journalists of color also left those
 newspapers during the same period in 2000.
     "It is incomprehensible how the number of Latinos in the general
 population continues to grow and yet our newsroom numbers remain stagnant,"
 said Alvear.  "Since these figures reflect last year's picture when media
 organizations were making profits at an all time high, we are concerned that
 with this year's economic downturn, the numbers will continue to fall because
 media companies are enacting cutbacks and layoffs.  We look forward to working
 with ASNE as the organization begins to conduct research to examine the issue
 of retention."
 
     CHART: The percentage of Latinos working at daily newspapers and Hispanic
 population
 
     Year       Hispanics as % of                 Hispanics as Percentage of
                Newsroom Employees                U.S. Population
     1982       1.2                               6.4% (14. 6 million)
     1983       NA
     1984       NA
     1985       1.5
     1986       1.6
     1987       1.7
     1988       1.9
     1989       2.1
     1990       2.1                               9.0   (22.5 million)
     1991       2.4                               9.3   (23.3 million)
     1992       2.6                               9.5   (24.2 million)
     1993       2.8                               9.8   (25.2 million)
     1994       3.0                               10.0  (26.1 million)
     1995       3.2                               10.3  (27.1 million)
     1996       3.4                               10.6  (28 million)
     1997       3.5                               10.9  (29.7 million)
     1998       3.5                               11.2  (30.2 million)
     1999       3.68                              11.5  (31.3 million)
     2000       3.66                              13.0   (35.3 million)
 
     Note: Hispanic population figures for 1999 and 2000 are based on actual
 national Census Bureau counts. Other years are annual estimates provided by
 the bureau.
 
     The mission of the NAHJ, founded in 1984, is to increase the number of
 Hispanic journalists in the media profession and to improve news coverage of
 the nation's Latino community.
     For more information, call Joseph Torres at 202-662-7143 or visit the
 NAHJ's Web site at http://www.nahj.org .
 
 

SOURCE National Association of Hispanic Journalists
    WASHINGTON, April 3 /PRNewswire/ -- The National Association of Hispanic
 Journalists is alarmed that the percentage of Latino journalists working at
 English-language daily newspapers dropped slightly in 2000, according to the
 American Society of Newspaper Editors' annual newsroom survey released April
 3.
     ASNE's survey found that Latinos made up only 3.66 percent of all newsroom
 employees in 2000.  In 1999, Latinos made up 3.68 percent of all newsroom
 employees.  The percentage of journalists working in the nation's newsrooms
 who are Hispanic has increased only 2.5 percent between 1982 and 2000 (see
 chart below).
     Meanwhile, as the latest Census figures show, the U.S. Hispanic
 population, excluding Puerto Rico, has dramatically increased from 6.4 percent
 in 1982 (14.6 million) to 13.0 percent (35.3 million) in 2000.
     Overall, the survey found that the percentage of journalists of color
 working at daily newspapers fell from 11.85 percent in 1999 to 11.64 percent
 last year.  It is the first time that the percentage of journalists of color
 working at daily newspapers fell since ASNE began conducting its survey 23
 years ago.
     "This year's survey, more than ever, reveals that the industry is in
 crisis," said NAHJ President Cecilia Alvear, a producer at NBC News.  "We
 believe the lack of Latinos and other journalists of color working at daily
 newspapers continues to undercut the industry's credibility with the
 communities they serve.  It is clear the industry has not made diversity,
 including intellectual diversity, a priority."
     The ASNE survey found that 600 journalists of color were hired into their
 first full-time job last year.  But 698 journalists of color also left those
 newspapers during the same period in 2000.
     "It is incomprehensible how the number of Latinos in the general
 population continues to grow and yet our newsroom numbers remain stagnant,"
 said Alvear.  "Since these figures reflect last year's picture when media
 organizations were making profits at an all time high, we are concerned that
 with this year's economic downturn, the numbers will continue to fall because
 media companies are enacting cutbacks and layoffs.  We look forward to working
 with ASNE as the organization begins to conduct research to examine the issue
 of retention."
 
     CHART: The percentage of Latinos working at daily newspapers and Hispanic
 population
 
     Year       Hispanics as % of                 Hispanics as Percentage of
                Newsroom Employees                U.S. Population
     1982       1.2                               6.4% (14. 6 million)
     1983       NA
     1984       NA
     1985       1.5
     1986       1.6
     1987       1.7
     1988       1.9
     1989       2.1
     1990       2.1                               9.0   (22.5 million)
     1991       2.4                               9.3   (23.3 million)
     1992       2.6                               9.5   (24.2 million)
     1993       2.8                               9.8   (25.2 million)
     1994       3.0                               10.0  (26.1 million)
     1995       3.2                               10.3  (27.1 million)
     1996       3.4                               10.6  (28 million)
     1997       3.5                               10.9  (29.7 million)
     1998       3.5                               11.2  (30.2 million)
     1999       3.68                              11.5  (31.3 million)
     2000       3.66                              13.0   (35.3 million)
 
     Note: Hispanic population figures for 1999 and 2000 are based on actual
 national Census Bureau counts. Other years are annual estimates provided by
 the bureau.
 
     The mission of the NAHJ, founded in 1984, is to increase the number of
 Hispanic journalists in the media profession and to improve news coverage of
 the nation's Latino community.
     For more information, call Joseph Torres at 202-662-7143 or visit the
 NAHJ's Web site at http://www.nahj.org .
 
 SOURCE  National Association of Hispanic Journalists