National Security Planning Faces Enormous Strategic Challenges - Opportunity Exists to Reinforce Diplomacy, Aid

Apr 25, 2001, 01:00 ET from Open Source Solutions, Inc.

    WASHINGTON, April 25 /PRNewswire/ -- According to Dr. Steven Metz, Acting
 Chairman of the Regional Strategy and Planning Department at the U.S. Army War
 College Strategic Studies Institute, "The greatest danger to the U.S. Army is
 not battlefield defeat, but that it will lose its relevance because of an
 obsession with old forms of war and a refusal to fully grapple with radically
 new ones."
     On 10 May 2001, in Washington, D.C., Metz will lead distinguished
 strategists interacting with international government intelligence
 professionals on the subject of "From Threat to Strategy to Force Structure:
 Understanding the Real World."  This international security affairs workshop
 is open to the public for additional registrations.
     Visiting from Europe, where he is the principal researcher for the World
 Conflict & Human Rights 2000 project sponsored by the Dutch Ministries of
 Defense and Foreign Affairs and the European Centre for Conflict Prevention,
 Utrecht University, Researcher Albert Jongman points out that real world
 threat demands much more than a single heavy armored force today: "There were
 26 active high intensity conflicts in 1999/00 ... 78 corroborated low
 intensity conflicts in 1999/00 ... (and a) total of 178 violent political
 conflicts ... "  From water scarcity to ethnic conflict along the Sino-Slavic
 and Slavic-Islamic to massive forced migrations and epidemic diseases, the
 world of the 21st Century is far removed from the Cold War era and a new
 national security strategy and new forces.
     Observers are concerned by the poor strategic culture in America, and the
 lack of strategic thinking in senior policy circles.  Dr. Greg Foster from the
 National Defense University, comments. "There is a stifling air of
 intellectual stagnation that pervades the U.S. national security community
 today, discourages unconventional (especially truly strategic) thought, and
 cruelly discredits would-be iconoclasts."  Among the iconoclastic ideas to
 which he refers is one suggesting that Program 150 (diplomacy and assistance
 including the Peace Corps, medical, and water relief) should be doubled before
 any more money is invested in Program 50 (defense).
     Other speakers include Maj Kristan Wheaton, author of The Warning
 Solution: Intelligent Analysis in the Age of Information Overload (AFCEA,
 2001).
     Additional information is available at http://www.oss.net/OSS01 , by
 sending email to oss01@oss.net, faxing 703-242-1711, or by calling
 703-242-1700.
 
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SOURCE Open Source Solutions, Inc.
    WASHINGTON, April 25 /PRNewswire/ -- According to Dr. Steven Metz, Acting
 Chairman of the Regional Strategy and Planning Department at the U.S. Army War
 College Strategic Studies Institute, "The greatest danger to the U.S. Army is
 not battlefield defeat, but that it will lose its relevance because of an
 obsession with old forms of war and a refusal to fully grapple with radically
 new ones."
     On 10 May 2001, in Washington, D.C., Metz will lead distinguished
 strategists interacting with international government intelligence
 professionals on the subject of "From Threat to Strategy to Force Structure:
 Understanding the Real World."  This international security affairs workshop
 is open to the public for additional registrations.
     Visiting from Europe, where he is the principal researcher for the World
 Conflict & Human Rights 2000 project sponsored by the Dutch Ministries of
 Defense and Foreign Affairs and the European Centre for Conflict Prevention,
 Utrecht University, Researcher Albert Jongman points out that real world
 threat demands much more than a single heavy armored force today: "There were
 26 active high intensity conflicts in 1999/00 ... 78 corroborated low
 intensity conflicts in 1999/00 ... (and a) total of 178 violent political
 conflicts ... "  From water scarcity to ethnic conflict along the Sino-Slavic
 and Slavic-Islamic to massive forced migrations and epidemic diseases, the
 world of the 21st Century is far removed from the Cold War era and a new
 national security strategy and new forces.
     Observers are concerned by the poor strategic culture in America, and the
 lack of strategic thinking in senior policy circles.  Dr. Greg Foster from the
 National Defense University, comments. "There is a stifling air of
 intellectual stagnation that pervades the U.S. national security community
 today, discourages unconventional (especially truly strategic) thought, and
 cruelly discredits would-be iconoclasts."  Among the iconoclastic ideas to
 which he refers is one suggesting that Program 150 (diplomacy and assistance
 including the Peace Corps, medical, and water relief) should be doubled before
 any more money is invested in Program 50 (defense).
     Other speakers include Maj Kristan Wheaton, author of The Warning
 Solution: Intelligent Analysis in the Age of Information Overload (AFCEA,
 2001).
     Additional information is available at http://www.oss.net/OSS01 , by
 sending email to oss01@oss.net, faxing 703-242-1711, or by calling
 703-242-1700.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X85057477
 
 SOURCE  Open Source Solutions, Inc.