National Summit on Building Performance Speakers Emphasize Future Workplace Agility, Strategies

Apr 04, 2001, 01:00 ET from Johnson Controls, Inc.

    WASHINGTON, April 4 /PRNewswire/ -- Traditional ways of planning and using
 workplaces were challenged by the nation's leading workplace thinkers at the
 Fifth Annual National Summit on Building Performance sponsored by Johnson
 Controls, the American Institute of Architects, the International Facility
 Management Association and NACORE International.
     This year's March conference, built around the theme, "Corporate Agility,"
 included a keynote address by Ted Leonsis, vice chairman and new products
 officer at America Online (AOL) and panel discussions on the physical and
 technological impact of agility, organizational performance and sustaining the
 environment and social communities.
     The symposium, regarded as a premier conference on strategic management of
 corporate work environments, attracted more than 200 real estate
 professionals, architects, facility managers and other corporate executives to
 the Ronald Reagan International Trade Center.
     Leonsis told attendees that each new technology advance, from the
 telephone to the microprocessor, changes how people interact with each other
 at home and on the job.  Today, observers are taking note of human behavioral
 reactions to the Internet.
     Technological advances, coupled with a globalization trend, contribute to
 where and how employees work, according to a panel of workplace experts that
 included representatives of Sun Microsystems and Cisco Systems.
     Knowledge work -- activities that are instantly transported from place to
 place via the Internet -- allows for flexible workplaces.  Panelists cited
 office buildings designed with "touch down space" shared by workers performing
 short-term tasks and "collision space" like conference rooms and cafeterias
 where worker teams collaborate and socialize.
     "This workplace is not a place -- It's a whole network of places," said
 Mattias Bergman, manager of work telepresence at Sun Microsystems.  "We've got
 to allow our people to work -- with their colleagues, their customers or alone
 -- where and when they need to.  Their work needs to dictate (the specific
 location)."
     Organizational structures are also changing with technology.  Panelists
 from Procter & Gamble and Hewlett Packard said that by sharing services used
 by the entire company -- such as human resources, finance, logistics and
 marketing -- their global organizations have improved workplace performance
 and overall agility.
     "The whole issue around workplace is, we want to do what we need for the
 company to be productive and profitable.  But at the same time, we also want
 our people to be able to do the things that they need to do anyplace, anywhere
 and not put them in a box," said Wayne Matthai, vice president of global
 business services at Procter & Gamble.
     Today's information-driven workplaces and organizations are well situated
 for workplaces designed to effectively use energy and natural resources.  But,
 panelists from Brunel University, Natural Logic, and Interface Inc. noted that
 organizations have to want to develop environmentally friendly workplaces.
     "The leap is to understand that it's not about efficiency.  It's about
 reaching way beyond that to the point where we're actually beginning to
 co-create with nature, to be a partner with nature and understand its
 effectiveness," said Bill Reed, vice president of integrative design at
 Natural Logic, a planning firm.
     For additional information about speakers and presentations at the Fifth
 Annual National Summit on Building Performance, contact Mari Randa at
 414-227-3514.  More information on the National Summit is also available on
 the Johnson Controls Web site at http://www.johnsoncontrols.com/ifm
 
 

SOURCE Johnson Controls, Inc.
    WASHINGTON, April 4 /PRNewswire/ -- Traditional ways of planning and using
 workplaces were challenged by the nation's leading workplace thinkers at the
 Fifth Annual National Summit on Building Performance sponsored by Johnson
 Controls, the American Institute of Architects, the International Facility
 Management Association and NACORE International.
     This year's March conference, built around the theme, "Corporate Agility,"
 included a keynote address by Ted Leonsis, vice chairman and new products
 officer at America Online (AOL) and panel discussions on the physical and
 technological impact of agility, organizational performance and sustaining the
 environment and social communities.
     The symposium, regarded as a premier conference on strategic management of
 corporate work environments, attracted more than 200 real estate
 professionals, architects, facility managers and other corporate executives to
 the Ronald Reagan International Trade Center.
     Leonsis told attendees that each new technology advance, from the
 telephone to the microprocessor, changes how people interact with each other
 at home and on the job.  Today, observers are taking note of human behavioral
 reactions to the Internet.
     Technological advances, coupled with a globalization trend, contribute to
 where and how employees work, according to a panel of workplace experts that
 included representatives of Sun Microsystems and Cisco Systems.
     Knowledge work -- activities that are instantly transported from place to
 place via the Internet -- allows for flexible workplaces.  Panelists cited
 office buildings designed with "touch down space" shared by workers performing
 short-term tasks and "collision space" like conference rooms and cafeterias
 where worker teams collaborate and socialize.
     "This workplace is not a place -- It's a whole network of places," said
 Mattias Bergman, manager of work telepresence at Sun Microsystems.  "We've got
 to allow our people to work -- with their colleagues, their customers or alone
 -- where and when they need to.  Their work needs to dictate (the specific
 location)."
     Organizational structures are also changing with technology.  Panelists
 from Procter & Gamble and Hewlett Packard said that by sharing services used
 by the entire company -- such as human resources, finance, logistics and
 marketing -- their global organizations have improved workplace performance
 and overall agility.
     "The whole issue around workplace is, we want to do what we need for the
 company to be productive and profitable.  But at the same time, we also want
 our people to be able to do the things that they need to do anyplace, anywhere
 and not put them in a box," said Wayne Matthai, vice president of global
 business services at Procter & Gamble.
     Today's information-driven workplaces and organizations are well situated
 for workplaces designed to effectively use energy and natural resources.  But,
 panelists from Brunel University, Natural Logic, and Interface Inc. noted that
 organizations have to want to develop environmentally friendly workplaces.
     "The leap is to understand that it's not about efficiency.  It's about
 reaching way beyond that to the point where we're actually beginning to
 co-create with nature, to be a partner with nature and understand its
 effectiveness," said Bill Reed, vice president of integrative design at
 Natural Logic, a planning firm.
     For additional information about speakers and presentations at the Fifth
 Annual National Summit on Building Performance, contact Mari Randa at
 414-227-3514.  More information on the National Summit is also available on
 the Johnson Controls Web site at http://www.johnsoncontrols.com/ifm
 
 SOURCE  Johnson Controls, Inc.

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