New Advertising Campaign for Pro-Choice Movement

Apr 03, 2001, 01:00 ET from Pro-Choice Public Education Project

    NEW YORK, April 3 /PRNewswire/ -- The Pro-Choice Public Education Project
 (PEP) launches a new aggressive campaign this April, targeting young women
 16-25 to make them aware of threats to reproductive rights. The national
 campaign created by the award winning ad agency, DeVito/Verdi will extend to
 subway and metro systems, college newspapers and outdoor posters.
     PEP is the largest coalition of pro-choice organizations in the country
 dedicated to conducting research on the opinions of young women on
 reproductive rights and widely disseminating creative pro-choice messages to
 young women.
     PEP's mission is to reach and educate young women 16-25 about reproductive
 freedom and choice, energizing a new generation of pro-choice leadership.
     "In this political climate, with an anti-choice president, it is very
 important that young women who were born after abortion became legal
 understand that their rights are in jeopardy," says Alea Woodlee, PEP's
 Director.
 
     Transit Car Cards
     Subway and rail car ads depict the grim reality before Roe vs. Wade. The
 tagline reads "Take away a woman's right to choose and she's left to take
 matters into her own hands.  Please support keeping abortion safe and legal."
 Each ad shows places that have been used for illegal abortions: a car doubles
 as an "Abortion Clinic," a bathroom as an "Operating Room," and a dumpster
 serves as a "Patient Recovery Area." All are reminders of women's options pre
 Roe vs. Wade.
 
     Outdoor Postering
     Outdoor postings will run in major markets nationally. Posters designed to
 look like City Ordinances have Statements challenging basic rights invoke
 outrage at the absurdity of losing existing essential human rights. One reads,
 "A meeting will be held on the first of this month to determine whether women
 should retain the right to vote". The tag line, "If a woman loses her
 reproductive rights, who knows what rights she could lose next," emphasizes
 the message that reproductive rights are threatened.
 
     College Newspaper Ads
     Another series of powerful ads reaches college women across the country.
 The theme of the campaign revolves around the issue of parental notification.
 One reads, "My boyfriend didn't't force me to become a mother. My parents
 did."  The tagline for this reads, "End parental power over a minor's right to
 choose. It's pro-choice or no choice."
 
     History
     The Pro-Choice Public Education Project's previous campaign broke in
 December, 1998 and ran through February, 2001. The powerful, provocative
 campaign communicated that reproductive rights are under attack. Close to 40%
 of the country saw the campaign.
     Two television commercials for PEP were also produced. The major networks
 refused to run them citing various reasons, including policies that 'preclude
 accepting commercials which take an advocacy position on one side of a
 controversial issue of public importance.' Yet the networks ran the DeMoss,
 Pro-Life ads, citing the ads, 'spoke of values.'
 
     Contact http://www.protectchoice.org or call 888-253-CHOICE.
 
 

SOURCE Pro-Choice Public Education Project
    NEW YORK, April 3 /PRNewswire/ -- The Pro-Choice Public Education Project
 (PEP) launches a new aggressive campaign this April, targeting young women
 16-25 to make them aware of threats to reproductive rights. The national
 campaign created by the award winning ad agency, DeVito/Verdi will extend to
 subway and metro systems, college newspapers and outdoor posters.
     PEP is the largest coalition of pro-choice organizations in the country
 dedicated to conducting research on the opinions of young women on
 reproductive rights and widely disseminating creative pro-choice messages to
 young women.
     PEP's mission is to reach and educate young women 16-25 about reproductive
 freedom and choice, energizing a new generation of pro-choice leadership.
     "In this political climate, with an anti-choice president, it is very
 important that young women who were born after abortion became legal
 understand that their rights are in jeopardy," says Alea Woodlee, PEP's
 Director.
 
     Transit Car Cards
     Subway and rail car ads depict the grim reality before Roe vs. Wade. The
 tagline reads "Take away a woman's right to choose and she's left to take
 matters into her own hands.  Please support keeping abortion safe and legal."
 Each ad shows places that have been used for illegal abortions: a car doubles
 as an "Abortion Clinic," a bathroom as an "Operating Room," and a dumpster
 serves as a "Patient Recovery Area." All are reminders of women's options pre
 Roe vs. Wade.
 
     Outdoor Postering
     Outdoor postings will run in major markets nationally. Posters designed to
 look like City Ordinances have Statements challenging basic rights invoke
 outrage at the absurdity of losing existing essential human rights. One reads,
 "A meeting will be held on the first of this month to determine whether women
 should retain the right to vote". The tag line, "If a woman loses her
 reproductive rights, who knows what rights she could lose next," emphasizes
 the message that reproductive rights are threatened.
 
     College Newspaper Ads
     Another series of powerful ads reaches college women across the country.
 The theme of the campaign revolves around the issue of parental notification.
 One reads, "My boyfriend didn't't force me to become a mother. My parents
 did."  The tagline for this reads, "End parental power over a minor's right to
 choose. It's pro-choice or no choice."
 
     History
     The Pro-Choice Public Education Project's previous campaign broke in
 December, 1998 and ran through February, 2001. The powerful, provocative
 campaign communicated that reproductive rights are under attack. Close to 40%
 of the country saw the campaign.
     Two television commercials for PEP were also produced. The major networks
 refused to run them citing various reasons, including policies that 'preclude
 accepting commercials which take an advocacy position on one side of a
 controversial issue of public importance.' Yet the networks ran the DeMoss,
 Pro-Life ads, citing the ads, 'spoke of values.'
 
     Contact http://www.protectchoice.org or call 888-253-CHOICE.
 
 SOURCE  Pro-Choice Public Education Project