New Class of Synthetic Antibodies Are More Selective, More Potent Than Natural Proteins

'Super' Imprinted Polymers May Yield New Drugs, Research Tools, And

Diagnostics



Apr 17, 2001, 01:00 ET from Semorex Inc.

    NEW YORK, APRIL 17 /PRNewswire/ -- A new class of molecularly imprinted
 polymers (MIPs) has the ability to bind to small molecules and to target
 molecules such as organics and proteins' with equal or greater potency than
 that of natural antibodies. These "super" MIPs work at lower concentrations
 than natural counterparts, with the potential for greater stability, lower
 costs, and customized manufacture than has been possible, according to
 scientists from Semorex Inc., a Jerusalem-based biotechnology company.
 Discovery of the new "super" MIPs was disclosed today at an immunology meeting
 in New York
 
     "The superior affinity and synthetic origins of these super MIPs will make
      possible the development of 'smart drugs', improved diagnostic and
      research tools that can be programmed to selectively bind to target
      molecules, proteins and other substances," said Bernard Green, Ph.D.,
      Professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Hebrew
      University School of Pharmacy in Jerusalem, and Chief Scientific Officer
      of Semorex. "These new MIPs offer substantial benefits over earlier
      generations, and their enhanced binding abilities can be extended to
      other compounds.
 
     "We expect the advent of these 'super' MIPs to hasten broader study and
      eventual commercialization of this highly promising class of polymers."
 
    MIPs utilize a proprietary combination of functional monomers and other
 components. During MIP synthesis, these polymers are imprinted so as to have
 complementary size, shape, charge and functional groups of the selected target
 by using the target molecule itself, or a substance having a very similar
 structure, as its "print" or "template."
     Previously, Semorex announced the first generation of MIPs that
 selectively bind to toxins linked to the onset of heart disease and several
 major cancers. Development of these polymers is expected to facilitate new
 treatments for these diseases, through the use of non-absorbable pills that
 cannot enter the bloodstream.
     "'Super' MIPs appear to effectively bind target molecules at far lower
 concentrations, and with greater potency, than earlier MIPs," Dr. Green noted.
 "Like antibodies, fluorescent 'super' MIPs can be coated onto beads or wells
 for use in highly sensitive separation or assay, or for use in high throughput
 screening of proteins. Simpler, less expensive and more stable immunoassays
 for use in diagnostic tests may be developed, as can new generations of orally
 available therapeutics which act solely to rapidly absorb targeted substances
 in the gastrointestinal tract."
     Semorex focuses on the discovery, development and commercialization of
 advanced polymer systems for use as therapeutics and diagnostics. An
 international consortium of biologists, physicians, chemists and polymer
 scientists formed the Company in order to develop polymeric systems that mimic
 the selectivity of antibodies but have the stability and ease of manufacture
 of traditional synthetic systems. Semorex has filed for patents covering its
 unique classes of MIPs and other synthetic compounds as well as special
 production techniques.
     Members of the Semorex Scientific Advisory Board include:
 
      -- Prof. Guenter Wulff (University of Dusseldorf, Germany; founder of
         imprinted polymer technology)
      -- Prof. Abraham J. Domb (Hebrew University, Jerusalem; polymer drug
         development & delivery)
      -- Prof. Fred Konikoff (Ichilov Medical Center, Tel Aviv;
         gastroenterology)
 
     Semorex is managed by Prof. Green and Morris Priwler, an entrepreneur with
 experience in the biotechnology field.  The Company's Board of Directors
 includes Dr. Sol Barer, the President and Chief Operating Officer of Celgene
 Corporation, Warren, NJ; Leslie Misrock, a senior partner at Pennie & Edmonds,
 Patent Attorneys, New York City, and Dr. Jerome Zeldis, Vice President of
 Medical Affairs and Chief Medical Officer of Celgene Corporation.
 
 

SOURCE Semorex Inc.
    NEW YORK, APRIL 17 /PRNewswire/ -- A new class of molecularly imprinted
 polymers (MIPs) has the ability to bind to small molecules and to target
 molecules such as organics and proteins' with equal or greater potency than
 that of natural antibodies. These "super" MIPs work at lower concentrations
 than natural counterparts, with the potential for greater stability, lower
 costs, and customized manufacture than has been possible, according to
 scientists from Semorex Inc., a Jerusalem-based biotechnology company.
 Discovery of the new "super" MIPs was disclosed today at an immunology meeting
 in New York
 
     "The superior affinity and synthetic origins of these super MIPs will make
      possible the development of 'smart drugs', improved diagnostic and
      research tools that can be programmed to selectively bind to target
      molecules, proteins and other substances," said Bernard Green, Ph.D.,
      Professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Hebrew
      University School of Pharmacy in Jerusalem, and Chief Scientific Officer
      of Semorex. "These new MIPs offer substantial benefits over earlier
      generations, and their enhanced binding abilities can be extended to
      other compounds.
 
     "We expect the advent of these 'super' MIPs to hasten broader study and
      eventual commercialization of this highly promising class of polymers."
 
    MIPs utilize a proprietary combination of functional monomers and other
 components. During MIP synthesis, these polymers are imprinted so as to have
 complementary size, shape, charge and functional groups of the selected target
 by using the target molecule itself, or a substance having a very similar
 structure, as its "print" or "template."
     Previously, Semorex announced the first generation of MIPs that
 selectively bind to toxins linked to the onset of heart disease and several
 major cancers. Development of these polymers is expected to facilitate new
 treatments for these diseases, through the use of non-absorbable pills that
 cannot enter the bloodstream.
     "'Super' MIPs appear to effectively bind target molecules at far lower
 concentrations, and with greater potency, than earlier MIPs," Dr. Green noted.
 "Like antibodies, fluorescent 'super' MIPs can be coated onto beads or wells
 for use in highly sensitive separation or assay, or for use in high throughput
 screening of proteins. Simpler, less expensive and more stable immunoassays
 for use in diagnostic tests may be developed, as can new generations of orally
 available therapeutics which act solely to rapidly absorb targeted substances
 in the gastrointestinal tract."
     Semorex focuses on the discovery, development and commercialization of
 advanced polymer systems for use as therapeutics and diagnostics. An
 international consortium of biologists, physicians, chemists and polymer
 scientists formed the Company in order to develop polymeric systems that mimic
 the selectivity of antibodies but have the stability and ease of manufacture
 of traditional synthetic systems. Semorex has filed for patents covering its
 unique classes of MIPs and other synthetic compounds as well as special
 production techniques.
     Members of the Semorex Scientific Advisory Board include:
 
      -- Prof. Guenter Wulff (University of Dusseldorf, Germany; founder of
         imprinted polymer technology)
      -- Prof. Abraham J. Domb (Hebrew University, Jerusalem; polymer drug
         development & delivery)
      -- Prof. Fred Konikoff (Ichilov Medical Center, Tel Aviv;
         gastroenterology)
 
     Semorex is managed by Prof. Green and Morris Priwler, an entrepreneur with
 experience in the biotechnology field.  The Company's Board of Directors
 includes Dr. Sol Barer, the President and Chief Operating Officer of Celgene
 Corporation, Warren, NJ; Leslie Misrock, a senior partner at Pennie & Edmonds,
 Patent Attorneys, New York City, and Dr. Jerome Zeldis, Vice President of
 Medical Affairs and Chief Medical Officer of Celgene Corporation.
 
 SOURCE  Semorex Inc.