New Nationwide Research Finds: Successful Women Business Executives Don't Just Talk a Good Game... They Play(ed) One

81% Played Organized Team Sports Growing Up



Women Executives Say Playing Team Sports Has Contributed to Their Business

Success; Cite Leadership Skills, Greater Discipline, Ability to Function

As Part of a Team



Still Going Strong: Most Women Executives Exercise at Least

Three Times Per Week



Survey Finds Sports and Sports Talk Are No Longer Just a 'Guy Thing' at Work



But Survey Finds Room for Improvement in Media's Coverage of Women's Sports,

Corporate Policies that Encourage, Facilitate Working Out



Feb 08, 2002, 00:00 ET from OppenheimerFunds

    NEW YORK, Feb. 8 /PRNewswire/ -- For women, the road to the boardroom may
 well lead through the locker room.
     More than four out of five executive businesswomen played sports growing
 up -- and the vast majority say lessons learned on the playing field have
 contributed to their success in business, according to the results of a
 national survey released here today.  And women business executives remain
 active, the survey found; two-thirds currently play sports or exercise at
 least three or more times a week.
     OppenheimerFunds, a leading mutual fund company and its parent company,
 the MassMutual Financial Group, a global, diversified financial services
 organization, commissioned the survey, titled "From the Locker Room to the
 Boardroom: A Survey on Sports in the Lives of Women Business Executives."  The
 research was conducted in association with Game Face: What Does A Female
 Athlete Look Like? -- a photographic exhibition that celebrates sport and
 physical daring in the lives of girls and women.
     The Game Face exhibition, which opened last June at the Smithsonian's Arts
 & Industries Building in Washington, D.C., is currently on display at the A.
 Ray Olpin Union at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City as part of a
 five-year national tour that is being sponsored by MassMutual and
 OppenheimerFunds.  It will be on display during the course of the 2002 Winter
 Olympics.
     "Women executives played sports growing up and continue to be physically
 active," said Frances B. Emerson, Senior Vice President, Corporate
 Communications at MassMutual.  "Importantly, they credit sports with teaching
 them skills and lessons that have advanced their ability to succeed in the
 workplace.  It's clear: the road to the boardroom frequently begins in the
 locker room."
     "Every two years, the Olympics reminds us that for men and women alike,
 athletic competition and striving is an essential part of the human
 experience," said Jane Gottesman, founder of the Game Face exhibition.  "What
 our exhibition depicts visually, this research proves empirically.  From the
 Olympian to the schoolyard athlete, women derive substantial benefits from
 participation in sports."
 
            Women Executives Played Sports Growing Up, Remain Active
 
     Most women executives grew up playing organized team sports.  Of the 401
 women surveyed, 327 -- or 82% -- reported playing organized sports after
 grammar school, including school teams, intramurals or recreational leagues.
     Basketball was the most popular participant sport, cited by 23% of the
 women who played sports.  It was followed by volleyball (22%), softball (17%),
 tennis (15%), track and field (10%) and soccer (8%).
     The survey found that businesswomen maintain a high level of physical
 activity.  Eighty-one percent said they currently participated in some sort of
 physical activity, sports or exercise. Of those, 66% did so at least three
 times a week.
     Asked which activities they currently participated in, jogging or exercise
 walking was the most popular response, cited by 43% of those who are active;
 26% said they work out either at home or at a gym.  Skiing and tennis were the
 most popular participant sports, cited by nine percent of those surveyed,
 followed by golf (8%) and swimming (6%).
     "Businesswomen exercise and play sports significantly more than the
 general population of women," Emerson said.  "Two-thirds of women business
 executives exercise regularly, which other research would indicate is close to
 double the proportion for the general population of women.
     "We were surprised both by the percentage of women executives
 participating and the degree of their participation," Emerson said.  "While
 most women business executives are no longer playing team sports, they are
 working out regularly and hard.  In fact, 49% of physically active
 businesswomen consider themselves athletes."
     Of the women executives who were not active, 73% cited lack of time as the
 reason they were not involved in physical activity.
     "When it comes to managing their budgets or their health, women find the
 same constraint: finding the time to do so," said Janet Wyse, Manager of
 Advocacy Programs at OppenheimerFunds.  "The spirit is willing; it's the
 schedule that is unforgiving.  In both cases, making the time to do so can
 yield big dividends."
     The nationwide random roll of 401 senior women business executives was
 conducted between December 5, 2001 and December 27, 2001 by the polling firm
 of Ziment, an independent market research firm. All women included in the poll
 had management responsibilities, made $75,000 or more annually and worked at
 companies with at least 100 employees.  The margin of error for the total
 sample of 401 is +/-4.1%. The margin of error for the 327 who played organized
 sports after grade school and the 326 women who currently exercise and/or
 participate in sports is +/-4.6%.
 
                How To Succeed in Business?  Grab Your Sneakers
 
      While women don't view sports as a career move -- only 26% said they
 participated to further career advancement -- the business benefits are
 undeniable.
     Of women who played organized sports after grade school, 86% said sports
 helped them to be more disciplined, 81% said sports helped them to function
 better as part of a team, 69% said sports helped them to develop leadership
 skills that contributed to their professional success, 68% said sports helped
 them to deal with failure, and 59% said sports gave them a competitive edge
 over others.
     Not only do businesswomen who played sports growing up believe sports has
 given them an edge in the workplace, they ascribe positive attributes to
 businesswomen currently participating in athletics.  Three out of five (60%)
 said women who participate in sports make more productive employees, and just
 over half (52%) said women who participate in sports are more respected by
 their fellow employees.
     "Women should play sports because they're enjoyable," said Wyse.  "Having
 said that, the benefits to health, self-esteem, and one's ability to function
 effectively in the workplace are considerable.  There are lessons to be
 learned on a softball diamond or basketball court that are unavailable in a
 business school lecture hall.  It's no coincidence that top businesswomen tend
 to have played sports and continue to be physically active."
 
                          Sports: Not Just a Guy Thing
 
     In the workplace, sports have entered the mainstream in more ways than
 one.
     Of the 327 women business executives who participated in sports after
 grade school, just 27% thought there was too much discussion of sports in the
 workplace and less than a third (32%) thought that there was too much use of
 sports language and metaphors at work.
     On a more practical level, only 21% of the 401 businesswomen surveyed said
 they were ever excluded from a business opportunity as a result of not
 participating in a particular sport.
     "The stereotype is that sports are used to exclude women from
 conversations and opportunities at work, but the facts just don't bear that
 out," Emerson said.  "The reality is that women are more involved than ever in
 sports -- both as participants and observers.  Women are familiar if not
 comfortable with the vernacular of sport.  When it comes to sports talk, we
 got game."
 
                                A Sports Culture
 
     The emergence of sports in the workplace is reflected in society more
 generally.
     Of the 401 women surveyed, 297 -- or 74% -- had children. Of those, 96%
 said they do/would offer a daughter either more or the same encouragement to
 play sports as they do/would offer a son.
     "The stigma attached to girls participation in sports is going, going,
 gone," Gottesman said.  "Helped along by Title IX, which is celebrating its
 30th anniversary in June, there is a clear understanding that the benefits of
 athletic participation accrue equally to men and women."
     Women's interest in sports and the positive self-esteem created by
 athletic participation have facilitated the idealization of the athletic body
 type.  Three-quarters of all respondents said that an athletic figure such as
 Venus Williams or Mia Hamm is preferable to a thin figure such as model Kate
 Moss or "Ally McBeal" actress Calista Flockhart.
     "In terms of body types, it used to be that thin was in," Gottesman said.
 "Now you could say 'win is in.' Women's interest and participation in sports
 has been reflected in a greater appreciation of the athletic figure."
     Women's perceived progress in other fields of endeavor was variable.  For
 example, 68% of executive businesswomen believe women have made more progress
 in business than in sports. On the other hand, more than half (52%) believe
 it's more likely that a woman will coach a major men's collegiate basketball
 team than be elected president of the United States.
 
                      Media Coverage Needs Improvement ...
 
     Survey respondents said that women's greater engagement in sports and
 exercise has not been adequately reflected in media coverage of women's
 sports.
     Sixty-three percent of the women surveyed said there needs to be more
 coverage of women's sports, and 76% believe women sports coverage needs to
 improve. Fifty-five percent of those surveyed said that women athletes are
 covered more for their looks/appearance than male athletes.  Seventy-two
 percent disagreed with the assertion that male athletes are more interesting
 than female athletes.
     "Game Face had its genesis ten years ago in the observation that the media
 was not adequately covering women's sports," Gottesman said.  "Unfortunately,
 that's probably still true. It's ironic that women's sports has progressed
 tremendously in business and society but less so in the nation's sports pages
 and television programming. We've got our game faces on; it would be nice if
 more people noticed."
     Perhaps reflecting the fact that women athletes have been underrepresented
 in the media, 78% of the women surveyed said they did not have a female
 athlete as a role model growing up.
 
                          ... So Do Corporate Policies
 
     Among the 401 business executives surveyed, 62% said their employer
 provided at least one incentive to work out. Fifty-four percent of the women
 working at a company providing a workout incentive said they took advantage of
 it.
     The most common incentive was an on-site facility (cited by 34% of all the
 women surveyed), followed by a discount at a local gym (22%).  Only eight
 percent said they had flex time to go to a gym and only five percent said they
 received lower health care premiums for exercising.
     Thirty-six percent of those surveyed said their employer provided no
 incentive to exercise.  Of those, 77% said they would take advantage of such
 an incentive.
     "While programs that facilitate workouts apply equally to men and women,
 they are even more valuable to women, who are frequently time constrained. In
 any event, workout incentives are the classic win-win," Emerson said.
 "Employees are more energetic and healthful, and as a result, companies get
 higher productivity and lower health care costs.  Companies have come a long
 way, but there is room for improvement."
 
     Founded in 1960, OppenheimerFunds, Inc. is one of the nation's most
 respected mutual fund managers.  As of December 31, 2001, the company and its
 subsidiaries managed assets of more than $120 billion, held in more than
 five million shareholder accounts.  The company is a long-standing supporter
 of investor education, well known for its breakthrough work in the area of
 Women & Investing.
     OppenheimerFunds is a subsidiary of Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance
 Company (MassMutual), which is headquartered in Springfield, Massachusetts,
 and is a member of the MassMutual Financial Group, a global, diversified
 financial services organization whose companies offer a broad portfolio of
 products and services, including life insurance, annuities, disability income
 insurance, long term care insurance, retirement planning products, trust
 services, and money management.
     The MassMutual Financial Group -- with more than $220 billion under
 management as of 9/30/01 -- is a marketing name for Massachusetts Mutual Life
 Insurance Company and its subsidiaries, which include: OppenheimerFunds, Inc.;
 David L. Babson & Company Inc.; Cornerstone Real Estate Advisers, Inc.;
 MassMutual International, Inc.; MML Investors Services, Inc.; Persumma
 Financial LLC; The MassMutual Trust Company, FSB; Antares Capital Corporation;
 MML Bay State Life Insurance Company and C.M. Life Insurance Company.
     Game Face: What Does a Female Athlete Look Like? is a unique,
 photography-based exhibition, book and educational outreach project that
 explores the tremendous impact sports has on the daily lives of millions of
 girls and women.  The project is administered by Game Face Productions, a 501
 (c)(3) not-for-profit corporation dedicated to promoting social progress and
 visual literacy.
     The Game Face exhibition was seen by 650,000 during its inaugural run at
 the Smithsonian Institution's Arts & Industries Building from June through
 December 2001.  The exhibition is currently at the University of Utah in Salt
 Lake City and it will be touring through mid-2006.  The Game Face book was
 published by Random House.
     Included in Game Face are works by more than 100 of America's best
 photographers including Ansel Adams, Annie Leibovitz, Mary Ellen Mark, and
 Dorothea Lange.
     In sponsoring the Game Face exhibition and this research survey, the
 MassMutual Financial Group and OppenheimerFunds, Inc. hope to raise awareness
 of the success women and girls have achieved in athletics and of the value of
 participation in sports and athletics.  In recognition of the 30th anniversary
 of Title IX and in hopes of further advancing gender equity in sports, Game
 Face Productions and Mass Mutual Financial Group have collaborated to develop
 a nationwide educational outreach program aimed at children in grades 5-8.
 The intent of this program is to teach the intangibles of tolerance,
 accountability, leadership, cooperation, determination and respect by exposing
 children to the challenges and accomplishments of the athletes featured in the
 Game Face exhibition and book.  For more information on the educational
 program, please contact Christine Hopkins-Scott of MassMutual at
 (413) 744-3773 or by e-mail at: Gameface@MassMutual.com
 
     For more information about any of the Oppenheimer funds, including charges
 and expenses, please obtain a prospectus by calling 1 800 525-7048 or by
 contacting your financial advisor. Read it carefully before you invest or send
 money.  The Oppenheimer funds are distributed by OppenheimerFunds Distributor,
 Inc. 498 Seventh Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X16339066
 
 

SOURCE OppenheimerFunds
    NEW YORK, Feb. 8 /PRNewswire/ -- For women, the road to the boardroom may
 well lead through the locker room.
     More than four out of five executive businesswomen played sports growing
 up -- and the vast majority say lessons learned on the playing field have
 contributed to their success in business, according to the results of a
 national survey released here today.  And women business executives remain
 active, the survey found; two-thirds currently play sports or exercise at
 least three or more times a week.
     OppenheimerFunds, a leading mutual fund company and its parent company,
 the MassMutual Financial Group, a global, diversified financial services
 organization, commissioned the survey, titled "From the Locker Room to the
 Boardroom: A Survey on Sports in the Lives of Women Business Executives."  The
 research was conducted in association with Game Face: What Does A Female
 Athlete Look Like? -- a photographic exhibition that celebrates sport and
 physical daring in the lives of girls and women.
     The Game Face exhibition, which opened last June at the Smithsonian's Arts
 & Industries Building in Washington, D.C., is currently on display at the A.
 Ray Olpin Union at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City as part of a
 five-year national tour that is being sponsored by MassMutual and
 OppenheimerFunds.  It will be on display during the course of the 2002 Winter
 Olympics.
     "Women executives played sports growing up and continue to be physically
 active," said Frances B. Emerson, Senior Vice President, Corporate
 Communications at MassMutual.  "Importantly, they credit sports with teaching
 them skills and lessons that have advanced their ability to succeed in the
 workplace.  It's clear: the road to the boardroom frequently begins in the
 locker room."
     "Every two years, the Olympics reminds us that for men and women alike,
 athletic competition and striving is an essential part of the human
 experience," said Jane Gottesman, founder of the Game Face exhibition.  "What
 our exhibition depicts visually, this research proves empirically.  From the
 Olympian to the schoolyard athlete, women derive substantial benefits from
 participation in sports."
 
            Women Executives Played Sports Growing Up, Remain Active
 
     Most women executives grew up playing organized team sports.  Of the 401
 women surveyed, 327 -- or 82% -- reported playing organized sports after
 grammar school, including school teams, intramurals or recreational leagues.
     Basketball was the most popular participant sport, cited by 23% of the
 women who played sports.  It was followed by volleyball (22%), softball (17%),
 tennis (15%), track and field (10%) and soccer (8%).
     The survey found that businesswomen maintain a high level of physical
 activity.  Eighty-one percent said they currently participated in some sort of
 physical activity, sports or exercise. Of those, 66% did so at least three
 times a week.
     Asked which activities they currently participated in, jogging or exercise
 walking was the most popular response, cited by 43% of those who are active;
 26% said they work out either at home or at a gym.  Skiing and tennis were the
 most popular participant sports, cited by nine percent of those surveyed,
 followed by golf (8%) and swimming (6%).
     "Businesswomen exercise and play sports significantly more than the
 general population of women," Emerson said.  "Two-thirds of women business
 executives exercise regularly, which other research would indicate is close to
 double the proportion for the general population of women.
     "We were surprised both by the percentage of women executives
 participating and the degree of their participation," Emerson said.  "While
 most women business executives are no longer playing team sports, they are
 working out regularly and hard.  In fact, 49% of physically active
 businesswomen consider themselves athletes."
     Of the women executives who were not active, 73% cited lack of time as the
 reason they were not involved in physical activity.
     "When it comes to managing their budgets or their health, women find the
 same constraint: finding the time to do so," said Janet Wyse, Manager of
 Advocacy Programs at OppenheimerFunds.  "The spirit is willing; it's the
 schedule that is unforgiving.  In both cases, making the time to do so can
 yield big dividends."
     The nationwide random roll of 401 senior women business executives was
 conducted between December 5, 2001 and December 27, 2001 by the polling firm
 of Ziment, an independent market research firm. All women included in the poll
 had management responsibilities, made $75,000 or more annually and worked at
 companies with at least 100 employees.  The margin of error for the total
 sample of 401 is +/-4.1%. The margin of error for the 327 who played organized
 sports after grade school and the 326 women who currently exercise and/or
 participate in sports is +/-4.6%.
 
                How To Succeed in Business?  Grab Your Sneakers
 
      While women don't view sports as a career move -- only 26% said they
 participated to further career advancement -- the business benefits are
 undeniable.
     Of women who played organized sports after grade school, 86% said sports
 helped them to be more disciplined, 81% said sports helped them to function
 better as part of a team, 69% said sports helped them to develop leadership
 skills that contributed to their professional success, 68% said sports helped
 them to deal with failure, and 59% said sports gave them a competitive edge
 over others.
     Not only do businesswomen who played sports growing up believe sports has
 given them an edge in the workplace, they ascribe positive attributes to
 businesswomen currently participating in athletics.  Three out of five (60%)
 said women who participate in sports make more productive employees, and just
 over half (52%) said women who participate in sports are more respected by
 their fellow employees.
     "Women should play sports because they're enjoyable," said Wyse.  "Having
 said that, the benefits to health, self-esteem, and one's ability to function
 effectively in the workplace are considerable.  There are lessons to be
 learned on a softball diamond or basketball court that are unavailable in a
 business school lecture hall.  It's no coincidence that top businesswomen tend
 to have played sports and continue to be physically active."
 
                          Sports: Not Just a Guy Thing
 
     In the workplace, sports have entered the mainstream in more ways than
 one.
     Of the 327 women business executives who participated in sports after
 grade school, just 27% thought there was too much discussion of sports in the
 workplace and less than a third (32%) thought that there was too much use of
 sports language and metaphors at work.
     On a more practical level, only 21% of the 401 businesswomen surveyed said
 they were ever excluded from a business opportunity as a result of not
 participating in a particular sport.
     "The stereotype is that sports are used to exclude women from
 conversations and opportunities at work, but the facts just don't bear that
 out," Emerson said.  "The reality is that women are more involved than ever in
 sports -- both as participants and observers.  Women are familiar if not
 comfortable with the vernacular of sport.  When it comes to sports talk, we
 got game."
 
                                A Sports Culture
 
     The emergence of sports in the workplace is reflected in society more
 generally.
     Of the 401 women surveyed, 297 -- or 74% -- had children. Of those, 96%
 said they do/would offer a daughter either more or the same encouragement to
 play sports as they do/would offer a son.
     "The stigma attached to girls participation in sports is going, going,
 gone," Gottesman said.  "Helped along by Title IX, which is celebrating its
 30th anniversary in June, there is a clear understanding that the benefits of
 athletic participation accrue equally to men and women."
     Women's interest in sports and the positive self-esteem created by
 athletic participation have facilitated the idealization of the athletic body
 type.  Three-quarters of all respondents said that an athletic figure such as
 Venus Williams or Mia Hamm is preferable to a thin figure such as model Kate
 Moss or "Ally McBeal" actress Calista Flockhart.
     "In terms of body types, it used to be that thin was in," Gottesman said.
 "Now you could say 'win is in.' Women's interest and participation in sports
 has been reflected in a greater appreciation of the athletic figure."
     Women's perceived progress in other fields of endeavor was variable.  For
 example, 68% of executive businesswomen believe women have made more progress
 in business than in sports. On the other hand, more than half (52%) believe
 it's more likely that a woman will coach a major men's collegiate basketball
 team than be elected president of the United States.
 
                      Media Coverage Needs Improvement ...
 
     Survey respondents said that women's greater engagement in sports and
 exercise has not been adequately reflected in media coverage of women's
 sports.
     Sixty-three percent of the women surveyed said there needs to be more
 coverage of women's sports, and 76% believe women sports coverage needs to
 improve. Fifty-five percent of those surveyed said that women athletes are
 covered more for their looks/appearance than male athletes.  Seventy-two
 percent disagreed with the assertion that male athletes are more interesting
 than female athletes.
     "Game Face had its genesis ten years ago in the observation that the media
 was not adequately covering women's sports," Gottesman said.  "Unfortunately,
 that's probably still true. It's ironic that women's sports has progressed
 tremendously in business and society but less so in the nation's sports pages
 and television programming. We've got our game faces on; it would be nice if
 more people noticed."
     Perhaps reflecting the fact that women athletes have been underrepresented
 in the media, 78% of the women surveyed said they did not have a female
 athlete as a role model growing up.
 
                          ... So Do Corporate Policies
 
     Among the 401 business executives surveyed, 62% said their employer
 provided at least one incentive to work out. Fifty-four percent of the women
 working at a company providing a workout incentive said they took advantage of
 it.
     The most common incentive was an on-site facility (cited by 34% of all the
 women surveyed), followed by a discount at a local gym (22%).  Only eight
 percent said they had flex time to go to a gym and only five percent said they
 received lower health care premiums for exercising.
     Thirty-six percent of those surveyed said their employer provided no
 incentive to exercise.  Of those, 77% said they would take advantage of such
 an incentive.
     "While programs that facilitate workouts apply equally to men and women,
 they are even more valuable to women, who are frequently time constrained. In
 any event, workout incentives are the classic win-win," Emerson said.
 "Employees are more energetic and healthful, and as a result, companies get
 higher productivity and lower health care costs.  Companies have come a long
 way, but there is room for improvement."
 
     Founded in 1960, OppenheimerFunds, Inc. is one of the nation's most
 respected mutual fund managers.  As of December 31, 2001, the company and its
 subsidiaries managed assets of more than $120 billion, held in more than
 five million shareholder accounts.  The company is a long-standing supporter
 of investor education, well known for its breakthrough work in the area of
 Women & Investing.
     OppenheimerFunds is a subsidiary of Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance
 Company (MassMutual), which is headquartered in Springfield, Massachusetts,
 and is a member of the MassMutual Financial Group, a global, diversified
 financial services organization whose companies offer a broad portfolio of
 products and services, including life insurance, annuities, disability income
 insurance, long term care insurance, retirement planning products, trust
 services, and money management.
     The MassMutual Financial Group -- with more than $220 billion under
 management as of 9/30/01 -- is a marketing name for Massachusetts Mutual Life
 Insurance Company and its subsidiaries, which include: OppenheimerFunds, Inc.;
 David L. Babson & Company Inc.; Cornerstone Real Estate Advisers, Inc.;
 MassMutual International, Inc.; MML Investors Services, Inc.; Persumma
 Financial LLC; The MassMutual Trust Company, FSB; Antares Capital Corporation;
 MML Bay State Life Insurance Company and C.M. Life Insurance Company.
     Game Face: What Does a Female Athlete Look Like? is a unique,
 photography-based exhibition, book and educational outreach project that
 explores the tremendous impact sports has on the daily lives of millions of
 girls and women.  The project is administered by Game Face Productions, a 501
 (c)(3) not-for-profit corporation dedicated to promoting social progress and
 visual literacy.
     The Game Face exhibition was seen by 650,000 during its inaugural run at
 the Smithsonian Institution's Arts & Industries Building from June through
 December 2001.  The exhibition is currently at the University of Utah in Salt
 Lake City and it will be touring through mid-2006.  The Game Face book was
 published by Random House.
     Included in Game Face are works by more than 100 of America's best
 photographers including Ansel Adams, Annie Leibovitz, Mary Ellen Mark, and
 Dorothea Lange.
     In sponsoring the Game Face exhibition and this research survey, the
 MassMutual Financial Group and OppenheimerFunds, Inc. hope to raise awareness
 of the success women and girls have achieved in athletics and of the value of
 participation in sports and athletics.  In recognition of the 30th anniversary
 of Title IX and in hopes of further advancing gender equity in sports, Game
 Face Productions and Mass Mutual Financial Group have collaborated to develop
 a nationwide educational outreach program aimed at children in grades 5-8.
 The intent of this program is to teach the intangibles of tolerance,
 accountability, leadership, cooperation, determination and respect by exposing
 children to the challenges and accomplishments of the athletes featured in the
 Game Face exhibition and book.  For more information on the educational
 program, please contact Christine Hopkins-Scott of MassMutual at
 (413) 744-3773 or by e-mail at: Gameface@MassMutual.com
 
     For more information about any of the Oppenheimer funds, including charges
 and expenses, please obtain a prospectus by calling 1 800 525-7048 or by
 contacting your financial advisor. Read it carefully before you invest or send
 money.  The Oppenheimer funds are distributed by OppenheimerFunds Distributor,
 Inc. 498 Seventh Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X16339066
 
 SOURCE  OppenheimerFunds