New Report Card Assesses Nation's Progress Towards Implementing Interoperability of Public Safety Wireless Communications

Apr 26, 2001, 01:00 ET from Public Safety Wireless Network

    FAIRFAX, Va., April 26 /PRNewswire/ -- A new report card released today by
 the Public Safety Wireless Network (PSWN) Program shows that many states
 across the country are taking significant steps in increasing the
 interoperability of their public safety wireless communications systems.
     "This nationwide report card, which is the first of its kind, provides us
 with a baseline assessment indicating where the nation's interoperability
 efforts currently stand," said Derek Siegle, a PSWN Program manager. "While
 the results do show states such as Delaware and Michigan leading the charge
 nationally, the study is meant to serve as an impetus for policymakers in
 determining steps that can be taken to further interoperability on a state-by-
 state basis."
     The PSWN Program, an initiative jointly sponsored by the Department of
 Justice and the Department of the Treasury, works with the public safety
 community at all levels of government to improve interoperability, which is
 the ability of public safety agencies such as fire, police, and emergency
 medical services (EMS) to efficiently communicate with one another via radio
 when responding to emergency situations.
     Using data collected from key public safety personnel at the state level,
 the report card compiled by the PSWN Program assessed each state's
 interoperability status in six key areas:  (1) shared systems development, (2)
 coordination and partnerships, (3) funding, (4) spectrum, (5) standards and
 technology, and (6) security. These six key areas were charted individually
 for each state and then combined to form a composite state interoperability
 score, falling into one of four levels:  mature, established, developing and
 new.  Listed below are the four classifications and each state's ranking.
 
     Mature:  States that have obtained interoperability within their region
     through the development of statewide systems and are actively seeking ways
     to enhance or improve their systems capability and possibly include
     additional participants.
 
         Mature states:  Delaware, Michigan
 
     Established:  States that are advanced in the interoperability process.
     Most of these states are in the process of implementing interoperable
     shared systems and have formalized sharing agreements with multiple levels
     of government.
 
         Established states:  Colorado, Florida, Iowa, Louisiana,
         Massachusetts, Minnesota, New York, North Dakota, Utah, Wisconsin
 
     Developing:  States in the early phases of utilizing their acquired
     knowledge of interoperability by engaging key legislative and public
     safety leaders and crafting strategic plans for system design and
     engineering.
 
         Developing states:  Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California,
         Connecticut, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Maine, Maryland,
         Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Carolina,
         Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota,
         Texas, Vermont, Virginia, Wyoming
 
     New:  States that are relatively new to the interoperability process and
     engaged in researching the six key interoperability areas. Typically these
     states are in the early stages of identifying potential solutions to
     interoperability issues.
 
         New states:  Alabama, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Idaho, Kentucky,
         Mississippi, Montana, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Washington,
         West Virginia
 
     "This national interoperability report card is just one of the many
 resources the PSWN Program is providing to the public safety community," said
 Rick Murphy, PSWN Program manager.  "We will now take the study's findings and
 work with states on developing technical approaches and policy-oriented
 solutions to their interoperability challenges."
 
     The PSWN Program brings together public safety officials from all levels
 of government and public safety to increase wireless interoperability among
 the nation's fire, police and emergency medical services departments. The
 program conducts pilot projects and symposiums nationwide, and provides the
 public safety community with comprehensive information on wireless
 interoperability through their Web site and information clearinghouse.  For
 more information, please contact the PSWN Program at 1-800-565-PSWN or via
 email at information@pswn.gov, or visit the PSWN Program Web site at
 http://www.pswn.gov .
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X16557635
 
 

SOURCE Public Safety Wireless Network
    FAIRFAX, Va., April 26 /PRNewswire/ -- A new report card released today by
 the Public Safety Wireless Network (PSWN) Program shows that many states
 across the country are taking significant steps in increasing the
 interoperability of their public safety wireless communications systems.
     "This nationwide report card, which is the first of its kind, provides us
 with a baseline assessment indicating where the nation's interoperability
 efforts currently stand," said Derek Siegle, a PSWN Program manager. "While
 the results do show states such as Delaware and Michigan leading the charge
 nationally, the study is meant to serve as an impetus for policymakers in
 determining steps that can be taken to further interoperability on a state-by-
 state basis."
     The PSWN Program, an initiative jointly sponsored by the Department of
 Justice and the Department of the Treasury, works with the public safety
 community at all levels of government to improve interoperability, which is
 the ability of public safety agencies such as fire, police, and emergency
 medical services (EMS) to efficiently communicate with one another via radio
 when responding to emergency situations.
     Using data collected from key public safety personnel at the state level,
 the report card compiled by the PSWN Program assessed each state's
 interoperability status in six key areas:  (1) shared systems development, (2)
 coordination and partnerships, (3) funding, (4) spectrum, (5) standards and
 technology, and (6) security. These six key areas were charted individually
 for each state and then combined to form a composite state interoperability
 score, falling into one of four levels:  mature, established, developing and
 new.  Listed below are the four classifications and each state's ranking.
 
     Mature:  States that have obtained interoperability within their region
     through the development of statewide systems and are actively seeking ways
     to enhance or improve their systems capability and possibly include
     additional participants.
 
         Mature states:  Delaware, Michigan
 
     Established:  States that are advanced in the interoperability process.
     Most of these states are in the process of implementing interoperable
     shared systems and have formalized sharing agreements with multiple levels
     of government.
 
         Established states:  Colorado, Florida, Iowa, Louisiana,
         Massachusetts, Minnesota, New York, North Dakota, Utah, Wisconsin
 
     Developing:  States in the early phases of utilizing their acquired
     knowledge of interoperability by engaging key legislative and public
     safety leaders and crafting strategic plans for system design and
     engineering.
 
         Developing states:  Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California,
         Connecticut, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Maine, Maryland,
         Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Carolina,
         Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota,
         Texas, Vermont, Virginia, Wyoming
 
     New:  States that are relatively new to the interoperability process and
     engaged in researching the six key interoperability areas. Typically these
     states are in the early stages of identifying potential solutions to
     interoperability issues.
 
         New states:  Alabama, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Idaho, Kentucky,
         Mississippi, Montana, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Washington,
         West Virginia
 
     "This national interoperability report card is just one of the many
 resources the PSWN Program is providing to the public safety community," said
 Rick Murphy, PSWN Program manager.  "We will now take the study's findings and
 work with states on developing technical approaches and policy-oriented
 solutions to their interoperability challenges."
 
     The PSWN Program brings together public safety officials from all levels
 of government and public safety to increase wireless interoperability among
 the nation's fire, police and emergency medical services departments. The
 program conducts pilot projects and symposiums nationwide, and provides the
 public safety community with comprehensive information on wireless
 interoperability through their Web site and information clearinghouse.  For
 more information, please contact the PSWN Program at 1-800-565-PSWN or via
 email at information@pswn.gov, or visit the PSWN Program Web site at
 http://www.pswn.gov .
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X16557635
 
 SOURCE  Public Safety Wireless Network