New Study Illustrates Abnormal PAT Signal Patterns in Heart Disease Patients

PAT Signal May Open New Doors to Understanding Cardiovascular

Disease First PAT-Based Device Recently Approved by FDA



Apr 24, 2001, 01:00 ET from Itamar Medical, Ltd.

    NEW YORK, April 24 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- Patients with
 coronary artery disease showed significantly different patterns in their
 exercise-induced Peripheral Arterial Tone, or PAT, signal compared to normal
 individuals, according to a report published in today's issue of Circulation,
 a journal published by the American Heart Association.
     PAT is a new physiological signal that accurately measures arterial
 pulsatile volume changes in the fingertip, which have been shown to mirror
 changes or anomalies in autonomic nervous system activity and related vascular
 events and can be independent of the patient's blood pressure, heart rate or
 ECG changes.  In the study published today, PAT Signal patterns during
 exercise stress testing were compared between 50 healthy volunteers and
 57 patients with documented heart disease.  The PAT was measured using
 specialized noninvasive finger mounted probes and signal processing
 algorithms.
     "The study revealed that patients with heart disease have distinct and
 abnormal PAT response patterns to exercise-induced stress when compared to
 heart-healthy individuals," noted lead author Alan Rozanski, MD, Professor of
 Medicine at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and a
 member of the Division of Cardiology at St. Lukes/Roosevelt Medical Center.
 "Normal individuals maintain or increase PAT amplitude with exercise,
 reflecting relaxed sympathetic control of peripheral vasodilatation and
 subsequent heat loss.  However, in this study, patients with heart disease
 often showed one or more patterns of paradoxical vasoconstrictive responses,
 or augmented sympathetic control, which may reflect peripheral vascular
 pathology even when evidence of obstructive coronary artery disease is not yet
 detectable by stress testing."
     The study, entitled Peripheral Arterial Responses to Treadmill Exercise
 Among Health Subjects and Atherosclerotic Patients, was published in the April
 24th issue of Circulation (Vol. 103, No. 16, page 2084); an abstract can be
 found at http://circ.ahajournals.org/current.shtml.
     The proprietary PAT Signal technology -- hardware, software, and signal
 processing algorithms -- was developed by Itamar Medical, a medical technology
 company based in Caesarea, Israel; the study was supported in part by a grant
 from Itamar Medical.  The company recently announced that the first PAT-based
 device, a unit that significantly increases the sensitivity and yield of ECG
 stress testing in the detection of myocardial ischemia, was approved for
 marketing in the United States.  To learn more about the PAT signal and Itamar
 Medical, visit http://www.itamar-medical.com.   For further information email
 contact@itamar-medical.com, or phone 1-800-206-6952, ext 204.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -- Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X17890597
 
 

SOURCE Itamar Medical, Ltd.
    NEW YORK, April 24 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- Patients with
 coronary artery disease showed significantly different patterns in their
 exercise-induced Peripheral Arterial Tone, or PAT, signal compared to normal
 individuals, according to a report published in today's issue of Circulation,
 a journal published by the American Heart Association.
     PAT is a new physiological signal that accurately measures arterial
 pulsatile volume changes in the fingertip, which have been shown to mirror
 changes or anomalies in autonomic nervous system activity and related vascular
 events and can be independent of the patient's blood pressure, heart rate or
 ECG changes.  In the study published today, PAT Signal patterns during
 exercise stress testing were compared between 50 healthy volunteers and
 57 patients with documented heart disease.  The PAT was measured using
 specialized noninvasive finger mounted probes and signal processing
 algorithms.
     "The study revealed that patients with heart disease have distinct and
 abnormal PAT response patterns to exercise-induced stress when compared to
 heart-healthy individuals," noted lead author Alan Rozanski, MD, Professor of
 Medicine at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and a
 member of the Division of Cardiology at St. Lukes/Roosevelt Medical Center.
 "Normal individuals maintain or increase PAT amplitude with exercise,
 reflecting relaxed sympathetic control of peripheral vasodilatation and
 subsequent heat loss.  However, in this study, patients with heart disease
 often showed one or more patterns of paradoxical vasoconstrictive responses,
 or augmented sympathetic control, which may reflect peripheral vascular
 pathology even when evidence of obstructive coronary artery disease is not yet
 detectable by stress testing."
     The study, entitled Peripheral Arterial Responses to Treadmill Exercise
 Among Health Subjects and Atherosclerotic Patients, was published in the April
 24th issue of Circulation (Vol. 103, No. 16, page 2084); an abstract can be
 found at http://circ.ahajournals.org/current.shtml.
     The proprietary PAT Signal technology -- hardware, software, and signal
 processing algorithms -- was developed by Itamar Medical, a medical technology
 company based in Caesarea, Israel; the study was supported in part by a grant
 from Itamar Medical.  The company recently announced that the first PAT-based
 device, a unit that significantly increases the sensitivity and yield of ECG
 stress testing in the detection of myocardial ischemia, was approved for
 marketing in the United States.  To learn more about the PAT signal and Itamar
 Medical, visit http://www.itamar-medical.com.   For further information email
 contact@itamar-medical.com, or phone 1-800-206-6952, ext 204.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -- Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X17890597
 
 SOURCE  Itamar Medical, Ltd.