New Tests Find Soy Isoflavones Can Offer Protection Against Alzheimer's Disease

Apr 20, 2001, 01:00 ET from Foods for the Future

    WASHINGTON, April 20 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- Researchers
 studying Alzheimer's disease are encouraged by new findings that soyfoods
 containing isoflavones may offer protection against the disease, which is
 considered an irreversible brain disorder.
     A number of studies have been conducted on soy's anti-Alzheimer's role,
 and a new study by a scientist at the University of Alabama in Birmingham has
 added to the weight of evidence by finding in animal tests that isoflavones in
 soy appear to have a protective effect against Alzheimer's.
     Isoflavones are naturally occurring compounds found in soy products, and
 have been reported to help fight off a number of diseases and illnesses.  Soy
 is the only plant product containing isoflavones.
     In Birmingham, Dr. Helen Kim found that monkeys that were fed soyfoods
 with isoflavones tended to have fewer protein brain alterations that have been
 associated with the onset of Alzheimer's disease, which affects a high
 percentage of elderly people.
     Dr. Kim's tests were conducted over a three-year period on 45 female
 monkeys that were fed three separate diets.  One diet featured soy
 isoflavones, and it was found to offer the strongest protection against the
 brain changes associated with Alzheimer's.  Dr. Kim said she believed soy
 isoflavones had the most positive effect because isoflavones are considered
 strong antioxidants.  Antioxidants fight off harmful free radicals in the
 human body.
     Dr. Kim presented her findings at a recent meeting of the American
 Chemical Society.  She said the next step in research should be testing her
 findings on humans.
     Alzheimer's disease, considered incurable, is expected to affect almost
 half of the elderly population at the age of 85 and beyond.  Dr. Kim said that
 while her research points to protection mainly for post-menopausal women, she
 believes that soy isoflavones benefit men also.
 
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SOURCE Foods for the Future
    WASHINGTON, April 20 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- Researchers
 studying Alzheimer's disease are encouraged by new findings that soyfoods
 containing isoflavones may offer protection against the disease, which is
 considered an irreversible brain disorder.
     A number of studies have been conducted on soy's anti-Alzheimer's role,
 and a new study by a scientist at the University of Alabama in Birmingham has
 added to the weight of evidence by finding in animal tests that isoflavones in
 soy appear to have a protective effect against Alzheimer's.
     Isoflavones are naturally occurring compounds found in soy products, and
 have been reported to help fight off a number of diseases and illnesses.  Soy
 is the only plant product containing isoflavones.
     In Birmingham, Dr. Helen Kim found that monkeys that were fed soyfoods
 with isoflavones tended to have fewer protein brain alterations that have been
 associated with the onset of Alzheimer's disease, which affects a high
 percentage of elderly people.
     Dr. Kim's tests were conducted over a three-year period on 45 female
 monkeys that were fed three separate diets.  One diet featured soy
 isoflavones, and it was found to offer the strongest protection against the
 brain changes associated with Alzheimer's.  Dr. Kim said she believed soy
 isoflavones had the most positive effect because isoflavones are considered
 strong antioxidants.  Antioxidants fight off harmful free radicals in the
 human body.
     Dr. Kim presented her findings at a recent meeting of the American
 Chemical Society.  She said the next step in research should be testing her
 findings on humans.
     Alzheimer's disease, considered incurable, is expected to affect almost
 half of the elderly population at the age of 85 and beyond.  Dr. Kim said that
 while her research points to protection mainly for post-menopausal women, she
 believes that soy isoflavones benefit men also.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X21717633
 
 SOURCE  Foods for the Future