New Worldwide Program Launched to Save Lives For Those Suffering From Chronic Lung Disease

Apr 04, 2001, 01:00 ET from Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease

    LONDON, April 4 /PRNewswire/ -- The first international guidelines for the
 diagnosis, management and prevention of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
 (COPD), the fourth leading cause of death in the world (1), were released
 today by an international team of scientists from the "Global Initiative for
 Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease" (GOLD).  The GOLD Workshop Report, which
 provides evidence-based recommendations for the clinical management of COPD,
 is the first step in an international effort to boost worldwide awareness of
 COPD and decrease the morbidity and mortality it causes.
     "COPD receives significantly inadequate attention from healthcare
 communities and governments, in comparison to its impact on the world's
 population," Professor Romain Pauwels, Workshop Chair explains.  "In order to
 reverse the increasing prevalence, a unified international effort is required.
 GOLD is a committed team of COPD experts and medical associations from more
 than 100 countries and its members will personally act to bring about the
 needed change in their home countries."
     The COPD Report, endorsed by the World Health Organisation (WHO) and the
 US National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), and reviewed by
 representatives from societies from the developed and developing world,
 focuses on implementation of the Guidelines at a national level by GOLD
 members and government organisations. Phases II and III will focus on family
 physicians and patients.
     "The impact of COPD on a global scale is immense.  With the dedication of
 the GOLD members and implementation of the programme they are introducing, the
 burden of COPD should decline in nations worldwide," says Nikolai Khaltaev,
 Non-Communicable Diseases and Mental Health Cluster, WHO.
     Claude Lenfant, Director of the NHLBI adds, "Research has shown that early
 intervention in patients with COPD can slow disease progression and reduce
 symptoms.  While we continue to look for improved treatments -- and ultimately
 a cure -- for COPD, it is important that we do everything possible to educate
 clinicians worldwide to better diagnose and treat this devastating disease.
 We believe that the GOLD initiative will further these goals."
     The report highlights the need for recognition of cough and sputum
 production as symptoms of people at risk of COPD.  They also emphasise that
 good management involves the assessment of both symptoms and lung function,
 rather than one or the other alone.
     The GOLD report also sets forth a formal system of four categories of
 severity of the disease and provides practical recommendations on the
 reduction of risk factors, management of stable COPD, and of COPD
 exacerbations.
     "Guidelines are often unrealistic and difficult to apply.  However the
 GOLD Workshop Report takes into account the differences in health care systems
 around the world and provides a practical scheme for the introduction of
 effective therapies," comments respiratory specialist Professor Peter
 Calverley, Professor of Pulmonary and Rehabilitation Medicine, University of
 Liverpool, UK.
     COPD is characterised by reduced airflow that is not fully reversible.
 Airflow limitation is usually both progressive and associated with an abnormal
 inflammatory response of the lungs to noxious particles or gases.  Symptoms
 range from a cough and sputum production in those 'at risk' to respiratory or
 heart failure in those with severe disease.  While cigarette smoking is a
 major known risk factor, much remains to be learned about other causes of
 COPD.
 
     (1) World Health Report 2000. Available from
 http://www.who.int/whr/2000/en/statistics.htm
 
     -- GOLD sponsors are: Asta Medica, AstraZeneca, Aventis, Bayer,
        Boehringer Ingelheim, Byk Gulden, Chiesi, GlaxoSmithKline, Merck,
        Sharp & Dohme, Mitsubishi-Tokyo, Nikken Chemicals, Novartis, Yamanouchi
        and Zambon
 
 

SOURCE Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease
    LONDON, April 4 /PRNewswire/ -- The first international guidelines for the
 diagnosis, management and prevention of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
 (COPD), the fourth leading cause of death in the world (1), were released
 today by an international team of scientists from the "Global Initiative for
 Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease" (GOLD).  The GOLD Workshop Report, which
 provides evidence-based recommendations for the clinical management of COPD,
 is the first step in an international effort to boost worldwide awareness of
 COPD and decrease the morbidity and mortality it causes.
     "COPD receives significantly inadequate attention from healthcare
 communities and governments, in comparison to its impact on the world's
 population," Professor Romain Pauwels, Workshop Chair explains.  "In order to
 reverse the increasing prevalence, a unified international effort is required.
 GOLD is a committed team of COPD experts and medical associations from more
 than 100 countries and its members will personally act to bring about the
 needed change in their home countries."
     The COPD Report, endorsed by the World Health Organisation (WHO) and the
 US National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), and reviewed by
 representatives from societies from the developed and developing world,
 focuses on implementation of the Guidelines at a national level by GOLD
 members and government organisations. Phases II and III will focus on family
 physicians and patients.
     "The impact of COPD on a global scale is immense.  With the dedication of
 the GOLD members and implementation of the programme they are introducing, the
 burden of COPD should decline in nations worldwide," says Nikolai Khaltaev,
 Non-Communicable Diseases and Mental Health Cluster, WHO.
     Claude Lenfant, Director of the NHLBI adds, "Research has shown that early
 intervention in patients with COPD can slow disease progression and reduce
 symptoms.  While we continue to look for improved treatments -- and ultimately
 a cure -- for COPD, it is important that we do everything possible to educate
 clinicians worldwide to better diagnose and treat this devastating disease.
 We believe that the GOLD initiative will further these goals."
     The report highlights the need for recognition of cough and sputum
 production as symptoms of people at risk of COPD.  They also emphasise that
 good management involves the assessment of both symptoms and lung function,
 rather than one or the other alone.
     The GOLD report also sets forth a formal system of four categories of
 severity of the disease and provides practical recommendations on the
 reduction of risk factors, management of stable COPD, and of COPD
 exacerbations.
     "Guidelines are often unrealistic and difficult to apply.  However the
 GOLD Workshop Report takes into account the differences in health care systems
 around the world and provides a practical scheme for the introduction of
 effective therapies," comments respiratory specialist Professor Peter
 Calverley, Professor of Pulmonary and Rehabilitation Medicine, University of
 Liverpool, UK.
     COPD is characterised by reduced airflow that is not fully reversible.
 Airflow limitation is usually both progressive and associated with an abnormal
 inflammatory response of the lungs to noxious particles or gases.  Symptoms
 range from a cough and sputum production in those 'at risk' to respiratory or
 heart failure in those with severe disease.  While cigarette smoking is a
 major known risk factor, much remains to be learned about other causes of
 COPD.
 
     (1) World Health Report 2000. Available from
 http://www.who.int/whr/2000/en/statistics.htm
 
     -- GOLD sponsors are: Asta Medica, AstraZeneca, Aventis, Bayer,
        Boehringer Ingelheim, Byk Gulden, Chiesi, GlaxoSmithKline, Merck,
        Sharp & Dohme, Mitsubishi-Tokyo, Nikken Chemicals, Novartis, Yamanouchi
        and Zambon
 
 SOURCE  Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease