Newspaper Industry Acts Boldly in the Face Of CMI, Fas-Fax Reports of Declines in Readership, Circulation

Studies Show 85 Percent of Adults Use a Daily Paper;

Many Cite Continued Utility, Satisfaction



Apr 30, 2001, 01:00 ET from Newspaper Association of America

    TORONTO, April 30 /PRNewswire/ -- Despite newly released figures that
 indicate a decline in newspaper readership and circulation, data from a recent
 survey of 37,000 U.S. adults indicate that 85 percent of them still use a
 daily newspaper.
     The latest results from the Competitive Media Index show that 53.5 percent
 of adults in the top-50 U.S. markets read a newspaper yesterday, and 63.8
 percent read one last Sunday. An NAA analysis of data from the Audit Bureau of
 Circulations shows that daily circulation fell 0.9 percent and Sunday was down
 1.7 percent for the period ending March 31, 2001. Details from both reports
 appear below.
     In addition, a new look at media usage finds consumers report not only an
 interest in newspaper advertising and content, but also high satisfaction with
 what they find. Results of that study are summarized in a release at
 http://www.naa.org/about/index.cfm . The complete 102-page report is online at
 http://www.naa.org/marketscope/MediaUsage_2000.pdf .
     These different sets of data were released during NAA's Annual Convention,
 being held April 29-May 2 at The Fairmont Royal York Hotel in Toronto.
 Programming includes a look at the industrywide Readership Initiative, as well
 as readership and circulation as audience measures.
     "We know readership has been slowly trending down, and the reason for this
 trend is understandable. People today simply have more choices for how they
 get their information and entertainment," noted NAA President and CEO John F.
 Sturm in his President's Report to the convention. "With more choice, the pie
 gets cut into smaller pieces. But our piece of the pie is holding up as well
 as or better than any other medium."
     The industry is in the midst of a major Readership Initiative designed to
 get to the heart of what drives readership. The Initiative has been
 progressing along two tracks. One is the 100-newspaper, 37,000-consumer study
 called Impact, conducted by the Readership Institute at the Media Management
 Center at Northwestern University.
     Among the results from the Impact study, which will be discussed at the
 NAA convention on Tuesday, May 1, is the encouraging finding that 85 percent
 of adults use a daily newspaper.
     The good news, according to the Readership Institute, is that the survey
 indicates readership growth is not only possible, but also happening in many
 markets. The Institute found eight key solutions to grow readership: service
 excellence; content emphasis; a particular type of local news; easy to read,
 navigable, relaxing papers; advertising; brand relevance; in-paper promotion
 of content; and a constructive culture within the newspaper. More about Impact
 can be found on the Web at http://www.readership.org .
 
                        Readership and Circulation Data
 
     The Spring 2001 Competitive Media Index, an NAA analysis of top-50 U.S.
 market data from Scarborough Research, found that daily newspaper readership
 fell from 55.1 percent to 53.5 percent. On Sunday, the CMI found that nearly
 two-thirds of adults in the top-50 U.S. markets read a newspaper each week
 (63.8 percent), a drop from 65.1 percent in the fall 2000 report.
     After registering slight declines in past reports, other media were
 holding their shares of the market. The average quarter-hour of radio morning
 drive time fell slightly, from 23.1 percent to 22.9 percent, while the average
 half-hour of broadcast television and cable prime time attracted 38.6 percent
 and 12.2 percent of adults. For television, it was a slight gain from the 38.1
 percent reported in the fall, while cable showed no change.
     "It would be disingenuous for us to say we're not concerned about what's
 happening with newspaper readership," commented NAA Senior Vice President and
 Chief Marketing Officer John E. Kimball. "Though we know that newspapers
 deliver better-than-Super Bowl-TV numbers everyday, we need to look at how
 newspapers can leverage their strengths in each market. That's one of the
 driving principles of the Readership Initiative."
     After registering slight gains at this time last year, newspaper
 circulation showed a small decrease according to an NAA analysis of the latest
 Fas-Fax report from the Audit Bureau of Circulations for the period ending
 March 31, 2001.
     According to an NAA analysis of ABC numbers, weekday circulation fell 0.9
 percent from the year before. Sunday circulation was down 1.7 percent for the
 same time frame.
     This analysis does not represent the entire universe of the more than
 1,400 U.S. daily newspapers. It is limited to newspapers reporting circulation
 to ABC in both periods ending March 31, 2000 and 2001.
     The 773 newspapers reporting daily figures showed an overall drop to
 46,460,027 from 46,896,799 for the yearlong period ending March 31, 2001.
     Among the top-20 circulation newspapers reporting daily gains were: USA
 Today; The Wall Street Journal; The New York Times; Chicago Tribune; Newsday,
 Melville, N.Y.; San Francisco Chronicle; The Dallas Morning News; New York
 Post; Chicago Sun-Times; and The Star-Ledger, Newark, N.J.
     The over 500,000 circulation category showed a very small drop of 0.01
 percent, while those in the 250,000-499,999 group were down 1.1 percent. The
 100,000-249,999 circulation category was down 0.7 percent; 50,000-99,999
 showed a drop of 1 percent; 25,000-49,999 was down 1.7 percent; and papers
 under 25,000 circulation fell 1.9 percent.
     On Sunday, the 620 newspapers reporting showed a decrease to 54,259,782
 from 55,208,436 for a total loss of 1.7 percent for the year ending March 31,
 2001.
     The top-20 circulation papers showing Sunday gains were: The New York
 Times; Los Angeles Times; Daily News, New York City; Newsday, Melville, N.Y.;
 and The Star-Ledger, Newark, N.J.
     The largest Sunday circulation group, over 500,000, showed a decline of
 1.6 percent. Papers with circulation 250,000-499,999 was down 2.8 percent;
 those with circulation 100,000-249,999 were off by 0.8 percent; the 50,000-
 99,999 group was down 1.7 percent; 25,000-49,999 reported a drop of 1.5
 percent; and papers with circulation under 25,000 were off 1.4 percent.
 
                                 Methodologies
 
     Impact examined 100 newspapers across the U.S., from 10,000 circulation
 dailies to major metro papers, for a representative sample of most types of
 newspapers. The consumer inquiry was culled from a detailed survey of general
 media habits and Impact-newspaper-specific usage, and was completed by 37,000
 readers and non-readers. The response rate to the mail-out was 37 percent,
 more than double the norm for this kind of survey.
     The CMI is based on audience research data collected by Scarborough
 Research, New York City, to which NAA subscribes. Scarborough, a leading
 media/market research firm, measures 66 DMAs (including the top 50), which
 encompass approximately 75 percent of the continental U.S. population 18 years
 or older. Scarborough collects data via telephone interview and a mailed
 consumer survey booklet and seven-day TV diary. Scarborough collected
 fieldwork for Release Two 2000 from August 1999 through September 2000.
     The ABC allows newspapers to break out on the Publishers Statements
 individual days or groupings of days if the variance on a certain day is less
 than 15 percent but more than 5 percent in excess or below the average for the
 other days of the week. This rule -- which went into effect with the Sept. 30,
 1998 Publishers Statements -- is designed to give advertisers a better picture
 of the circulation for the actual day their ad will run.
     The media usage report, "Leveraging Newspaper Assets: A Study of Changing
 American Media Usage Patterns," conducted for NAA by Clark, Martire &
 Bartolomeo Inc. of Englewood Cliffs, N.J., is based on a nationally
 representative sample of 4,003 adults. Interviewing on the survey was
 conducted between Jan. 4 and Feb. 7, 2000.
 
                       NAA Annual Convention Information
 
     Working press interested in covering the NAA Annual Convention may
 register onsite in the NAA Press Office in Confederation Room 6 (mezzanine
 level) at The Fairmont Royal York Hotel. The Press Office will be open daily
 through noon on Wednesday, May 2.
     Members of the press may be asked to show credentials, a copy of their
 publication showing their byline or name on the masthead, and/or a letter on
 company stationary from a top editor assigning them to cover the conference.
 In many cases, a business card will not be considered adequate press
 identification. Requests for mult boxes or other special set-ups must be made
 24 hours in advance.
     Sponsors of NAA's 2001 Annual Convention are: American Profile; The Globe
 and Mail, Toronto; Goss Graphic Systems; Heidelberg Web Systems; KBA - North
 America; The Mutual Insurance Co. Ltd.; NEXPO(R) 2001; Parade Publications;
 Presstime; SAP America; The Toronto Star; USA Weekend; Veronis, Suhler &
 Associates Inc.; and Videoaxs.
 
     NAA is a nonprofit organization representing the $59 billion newspaper
 industry and more than 2,000 newspapers in the U.S. and Canada. Most NAA
 members are daily newspapers, accounting for 87 percent of the U.S. daily
 circulation. Headquartered in Tysons Corner (Vienna, Va.), the Association
 focuses on six key strategic priorities that affect the newspaper industry
 collectively: marketing, public policy, diversity, industry development,
 newspaper operations and readership. Information about NAA and the industry
 may also be found at the Association's World Wide Web site on the Internet
 (http://www.naa.org ).
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X87251811
 
 

SOURCE Newspaper Association of America
    TORONTO, April 30 /PRNewswire/ -- Despite newly released figures that
 indicate a decline in newspaper readership and circulation, data from a recent
 survey of 37,000 U.S. adults indicate that 85 percent of them still use a
 daily newspaper.
     The latest results from the Competitive Media Index show that 53.5 percent
 of adults in the top-50 U.S. markets read a newspaper yesterday, and 63.8
 percent read one last Sunday. An NAA analysis of data from the Audit Bureau of
 Circulations shows that daily circulation fell 0.9 percent and Sunday was down
 1.7 percent for the period ending March 31, 2001. Details from both reports
 appear below.
     In addition, a new look at media usage finds consumers report not only an
 interest in newspaper advertising and content, but also high satisfaction with
 what they find. Results of that study are summarized in a release at
 http://www.naa.org/about/index.cfm . The complete 102-page report is online at
 http://www.naa.org/marketscope/MediaUsage_2000.pdf .
     These different sets of data were released during NAA's Annual Convention,
 being held April 29-May 2 at The Fairmont Royal York Hotel in Toronto.
 Programming includes a look at the industrywide Readership Initiative, as well
 as readership and circulation as audience measures.
     "We know readership has been slowly trending down, and the reason for this
 trend is understandable. People today simply have more choices for how they
 get their information and entertainment," noted NAA President and CEO John F.
 Sturm in his President's Report to the convention. "With more choice, the pie
 gets cut into smaller pieces. But our piece of the pie is holding up as well
 as or better than any other medium."
     The industry is in the midst of a major Readership Initiative designed to
 get to the heart of what drives readership. The Initiative has been
 progressing along two tracks. One is the 100-newspaper, 37,000-consumer study
 called Impact, conducted by the Readership Institute at the Media Management
 Center at Northwestern University.
     Among the results from the Impact study, which will be discussed at the
 NAA convention on Tuesday, May 1, is the encouraging finding that 85 percent
 of adults use a daily newspaper.
     The good news, according to the Readership Institute, is that the survey
 indicates readership growth is not only possible, but also happening in many
 markets. The Institute found eight key solutions to grow readership: service
 excellence; content emphasis; a particular type of local news; easy to read,
 navigable, relaxing papers; advertising; brand relevance; in-paper promotion
 of content; and a constructive culture within the newspaper. More about Impact
 can be found on the Web at http://www.readership.org .
 
                        Readership and Circulation Data
 
     The Spring 2001 Competitive Media Index, an NAA analysis of top-50 U.S.
 market data from Scarborough Research, found that daily newspaper readership
 fell from 55.1 percent to 53.5 percent. On Sunday, the CMI found that nearly
 two-thirds of adults in the top-50 U.S. markets read a newspaper each week
 (63.8 percent), a drop from 65.1 percent in the fall 2000 report.
     After registering slight declines in past reports, other media were
 holding their shares of the market. The average quarter-hour of radio morning
 drive time fell slightly, from 23.1 percent to 22.9 percent, while the average
 half-hour of broadcast television and cable prime time attracted 38.6 percent
 and 12.2 percent of adults. For television, it was a slight gain from the 38.1
 percent reported in the fall, while cable showed no change.
     "It would be disingenuous for us to say we're not concerned about what's
 happening with newspaper readership," commented NAA Senior Vice President and
 Chief Marketing Officer John E. Kimball. "Though we know that newspapers
 deliver better-than-Super Bowl-TV numbers everyday, we need to look at how
 newspapers can leverage their strengths in each market. That's one of the
 driving principles of the Readership Initiative."
     After registering slight gains at this time last year, newspaper
 circulation showed a small decrease according to an NAA analysis of the latest
 Fas-Fax report from the Audit Bureau of Circulations for the period ending
 March 31, 2001.
     According to an NAA analysis of ABC numbers, weekday circulation fell 0.9
 percent from the year before. Sunday circulation was down 1.7 percent for the
 same time frame.
     This analysis does not represent the entire universe of the more than
 1,400 U.S. daily newspapers. It is limited to newspapers reporting circulation
 to ABC in both periods ending March 31, 2000 and 2001.
     The 773 newspapers reporting daily figures showed an overall drop to
 46,460,027 from 46,896,799 for the yearlong period ending March 31, 2001.
     Among the top-20 circulation newspapers reporting daily gains were: USA
 Today; The Wall Street Journal; The New York Times; Chicago Tribune; Newsday,
 Melville, N.Y.; San Francisco Chronicle; The Dallas Morning News; New York
 Post; Chicago Sun-Times; and The Star-Ledger, Newark, N.J.
     The over 500,000 circulation category showed a very small drop of 0.01
 percent, while those in the 250,000-499,999 group were down 1.1 percent. The
 100,000-249,999 circulation category was down 0.7 percent; 50,000-99,999
 showed a drop of 1 percent; 25,000-49,999 was down 1.7 percent; and papers
 under 25,000 circulation fell 1.9 percent.
     On Sunday, the 620 newspapers reporting showed a decrease to 54,259,782
 from 55,208,436 for a total loss of 1.7 percent for the year ending March 31,
 2001.
     The top-20 circulation papers showing Sunday gains were: The New York
 Times; Los Angeles Times; Daily News, New York City; Newsday, Melville, N.Y.;
 and The Star-Ledger, Newark, N.J.
     The largest Sunday circulation group, over 500,000, showed a decline of
 1.6 percent. Papers with circulation 250,000-499,999 was down 2.8 percent;
 those with circulation 100,000-249,999 were off by 0.8 percent; the 50,000-
 99,999 group was down 1.7 percent; 25,000-49,999 reported a drop of 1.5
 percent; and papers with circulation under 25,000 were off 1.4 percent.
 
                                 Methodologies
 
     Impact examined 100 newspapers across the U.S., from 10,000 circulation
 dailies to major metro papers, for a representative sample of most types of
 newspapers. The consumer inquiry was culled from a detailed survey of general
 media habits and Impact-newspaper-specific usage, and was completed by 37,000
 readers and non-readers. The response rate to the mail-out was 37 percent,
 more than double the norm for this kind of survey.
     The CMI is based on audience research data collected by Scarborough
 Research, New York City, to which NAA subscribes. Scarborough, a leading
 media/market research firm, measures 66 DMAs (including the top 50), which
 encompass approximately 75 percent of the continental U.S. population 18 years
 or older. Scarborough collects data via telephone interview and a mailed
 consumer survey booklet and seven-day TV diary. Scarborough collected
 fieldwork for Release Two 2000 from August 1999 through September 2000.
     The ABC allows newspapers to break out on the Publishers Statements
 individual days or groupings of days if the variance on a certain day is less
 than 15 percent but more than 5 percent in excess or below the average for the
 other days of the week. This rule -- which went into effect with the Sept. 30,
 1998 Publishers Statements -- is designed to give advertisers a better picture
 of the circulation for the actual day their ad will run.
     The media usage report, "Leveraging Newspaper Assets: A Study of Changing
 American Media Usage Patterns," conducted for NAA by Clark, Martire &
 Bartolomeo Inc. of Englewood Cliffs, N.J., is based on a nationally
 representative sample of 4,003 adults. Interviewing on the survey was
 conducted between Jan. 4 and Feb. 7, 2000.
 
                       NAA Annual Convention Information
 
     Working press interested in covering the NAA Annual Convention may
 register onsite in the NAA Press Office in Confederation Room 6 (mezzanine
 level) at The Fairmont Royal York Hotel. The Press Office will be open daily
 through noon on Wednesday, May 2.
     Members of the press may be asked to show credentials, a copy of their
 publication showing their byline or name on the masthead, and/or a letter on
 company stationary from a top editor assigning them to cover the conference.
 In many cases, a business card will not be considered adequate press
 identification. Requests for mult boxes or other special set-ups must be made
 24 hours in advance.
     Sponsors of NAA's 2001 Annual Convention are: American Profile; The Globe
 and Mail, Toronto; Goss Graphic Systems; Heidelberg Web Systems; KBA - North
 America; The Mutual Insurance Co. Ltd.; NEXPO(R) 2001; Parade Publications;
 Presstime; SAP America; The Toronto Star; USA Weekend; Veronis, Suhler &
 Associates Inc.; and Videoaxs.
 
     NAA is a nonprofit organization representing the $59 billion newspaper
 industry and more than 2,000 newspapers in the U.S. and Canada. Most NAA
 members are daily newspapers, accounting for 87 percent of the U.S. daily
 circulation. Headquartered in Tysons Corner (Vienna, Va.), the Association
 focuses on six key strategic priorities that affect the newspaper industry
 collectively: marketing, public policy, diversity, industry development,
 newspaper operations and readership. Information about NAA and the industry
 may also be found at the Association's World Wide Web site on the Internet
 (http://www.naa.org ).
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X87251811
 
 SOURCE  Newspaper Association of America