Newspapers Considered More Credible Than Any Other Medium, NAA Report Finds

Newspapers Beat Internet, Other Media for Job Seekers, Home and Car Buyers



Apr 30, 2001, 01:00 ET from Newspaper Association of America

    TORONTO, April 30 /PRNewswire/ -- Consumers get news and information from
 a growing multitude of sources, but they see newspapers as more credible than
 TV, radio, magazines or the Internet, according to findings from a Newspaper
 Association of America study, "Leveraging Newspaper Assets: A Study of
 Changing American Media Usage Habits."
     Respondents also cite newspapers as their primary source for information
 in areas including local news, local entertainment information, business news
 and personal finance information. Newspapers are consumers' top source of
 advertising information, and an overwhelming number of those surveyed cited
 newspapers as their number-one resource for employment opportunities, homes
 and new and used cars for sale.
     The report provides a foundation for discussions during NAA's Annual
 Convention, being held April 29-May 2 at The Fairmont Royal York Hotel in
 Toronto.
     "Even in this era of increased media competition, this study shows us that
 newspapers continue to be one of the most trusted sources of information, as
 well as a top medium for advertisers to reach consumers," said John F. Sturm,
 NAA president and CEO. "Newspapers are part of the fabric of our communities
 in a way that no other medium can match."
     The study compared media usage in 2000 to benchmark figures established in
 1997. Although the results show a shift away from traditional media such as
 newspapers, radio and TV, and increased usage of the Internet, newspapers
 remain in a strong position relative to other media.
 
     *  Newspapers were more highly rated than TV, radio, magazines or the
        Internet for credibility, ease of use and depth/seriousness of purpose,
        and newspapers' overall credibility rating rose 5 percent since 1997's
        survey
     *  Two thirds (66 percent) of those surveyed cited newspapers as the
        one source they rely upon most for news and information about
        entertainment available in the local area, such as movies, concerts and
        restaurants
     *  Fifty-nine percent called newspapers the most relied-upon source for
        news about their local community or neighborhood
     *  Newspapers were the most relied-upon source for news about high-school
        sports, state news, TV listings and news about television, business
        news, news about faith and religion, and personal finance and investing
 
     Newspapers are relied on more than other media for advertising information
 in nearly every category including jobs, homes, new and used cars, groceries,
 movie tickets, home furnishings, clothing, health and beauty aids, travel,
 financial services, and personal computers.
 
     *  Over three-quarters (78 percent) cited daily or Sunday newspapers as
        the one source relied upon most for employment and job opportunities.
        The Internet was a distant second at 10 percent
     *  Seventy-three percent identified newspapers as the main source for
        advertising information related to used cars and 59 percent cited
        newspapers as the main source when shopping for a new car
     *  Newspapers are the main source for advertising information on new and
        existing homes for 72 percent of respondents
     *  Newspapers provide the main source for advertising information on food
        and groceries for 70 percent of those surveyed
     *  Over two thirds (68 percent) cited newspapers as the main source for
        advertising information on tickets to a movie or live entertainment
        event.
 
     Consumers don't just look to newspaper advertising because it's there;
 they also report a very high rate of satisfaction with newspaper advertising.
 
     *  Consumer satisfaction with newspaper employment ads was 68 percent,
        compared with 58 percent for the Internet, the next highest rated
        medium in that category
     *  For entertainment ads, consumer satisfaction was 62 percent for
        newspapers, 50 percent for the Internet, 49 percent for TV and 41
        percent for magazines
     *  Newspaper automotive ads scored a 61 percent satisfaction rating,
        compared with 53 percent for the Internet, 49 percent for TV and 44
        percent for magazines
 
     The entire 102-page report, "Leveraging Newspaper Assets," can be
 downloaded as a Portable Document Format file from NAA's Web site at
 http://www.naa.org/marketscope/index.html .
 
     Methodology: The study was based on a nationally representative sample of
 4,003 adults, 18 years of age and over. Interviewing was conducted between
 January 4 and February 7, 2000. The study revisits the same issues of media
 perception and usage explored in NAA's 1997 study, "So Many Choices, So Little
 Time." The total results carry a sampling error of approximately +2.5%.
     Working press interested in covering the NAA Annual Convention may
 register onsite in the NAA Press Office in Confederation Room 6 (mezzanine
 level) at The Fairmont Royal York Hotel beginning Saturday, April 28 at 9 a.m.
 Members of the press may be asked to show credentials, a copy of their
 publication showing their byline or name on the masthead, and/or a letter on
 company stationary from a top editor assigning them to cover the conference.
     Sponsors of NAA's 2001 Annual Convention are: American Profile; The Globe
 and Mail, Toronto; Goss Graphic Systems; Heidelberg Web Systems; KBA - North
 America; The Mutual Insurance Co. Ltd.; NEXPO(R) 2001; Parade Publications;
 Presstime; SAP America; The Toronto Star; USA Weekend; Veronis, Suhler &
 Associates Inc.; and Videoaxs.
 
     NAA is a nonprofit organization representing the $59 billion newspaper
 industry and more than 2,000 newspapers in the U.S. and Canada. Most NAA
 members are daily newspapers, accounting for 87 percent of the U.S. daily
 circulation. Headquartered in Tysons Corner (Vienna, Va.), the Association
 focuses on six key strategic priorities that affect the newspaper industry
 collectively: marketing, public policy, diversity, industry development,
 newspaper operations and readership. Information about NAA and the industry
 may also be found at the Association's World Wide Web site on the Internet
 (http://www.naa.org ).
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X65101865
 
 

SOURCE Newspaper Association of America
    TORONTO, April 30 /PRNewswire/ -- Consumers get news and information from
 a growing multitude of sources, but they see newspapers as more credible than
 TV, radio, magazines or the Internet, according to findings from a Newspaper
 Association of America study, "Leveraging Newspaper Assets: A Study of
 Changing American Media Usage Habits."
     Respondents also cite newspapers as their primary source for information
 in areas including local news, local entertainment information, business news
 and personal finance information. Newspapers are consumers' top source of
 advertising information, and an overwhelming number of those surveyed cited
 newspapers as their number-one resource for employment opportunities, homes
 and new and used cars for sale.
     The report provides a foundation for discussions during NAA's Annual
 Convention, being held April 29-May 2 at The Fairmont Royal York Hotel in
 Toronto.
     "Even in this era of increased media competition, this study shows us that
 newspapers continue to be one of the most trusted sources of information, as
 well as a top medium for advertisers to reach consumers," said John F. Sturm,
 NAA president and CEO. "Newspapers are part of the fabric of our communities
 in a way that no other medium can match."
     The study compared media usage in 2000 to benchmark figures established in
 1997. Although the results show a shift away from traditional media such as
 newspapers, radio and TV, and increased usage of the Internet, newspapers
 remain in a strong position relative to other media.
 
     *  Newspapers were more highly rated than TV, radio, magazines or the
        Internet for credibility, ease of use and depth/seriousness of purpose,
        and newspapers' overall credibility rating rose 5 percent since 1997's
        survey
     *  Two thirds (66 percent) of those surveyed cited newspapers as the
        one source they rely upon most for news and information about
        entertainment available in the local area, such as movies, concerts and
        restaurants
     *  Fifty-nine percent called newspapers the most relied-upon source for
        news about their local community or neighborhood
     *  Newspapers were the most relied-upon source for news about high-school
        sports, state news, TV listings and news about television, business
        news, news about faith and religion, and personal finance and investing
 
     Newspapers are relied on more than other media for advertising information
 in nearly every category including jobs, homes, new and used cars, groceries,
 movie tickets, home furnishings, clothing, health and beauty aids, travel,
 financial services, and personal computers.
 
     *  Over three-quarters (78 percent) cited daily or Sunday newspapers as
        the one source relied upon most for employment and job opportunities.
        The Internet was a distant second at 10 percent
     *  Seventy-three percent identified newspapers as the main source for
        advertising information related to used cars and 59 percent cited
        newspapers as the main source when shopping for a new car
     *  Newspapers are the main source for advertising information on new and
        existing homes for 72 percent of respondents
     *  Newspapers provide the main source for advertising information on food
        and groceries for 70 percent of those surveyed
     *  Over two thirds (68 percent) cited newspapers as the main source for
        advertising information on tickets to a movie or live entertainment
        event.
 
     Consumers don't just look to newspaper advertising because it's there;
 they also report a very high rate of satisfaction with newspaper advertising.
 
     *  Consumer satisfaction with newspaper employment ads was 68 percent,
        compared with 58 percent for the Internet, the next highest rated
        medium in that category
     *  For entertainment ads, consumer satisfaction was 62 percent for
        newspapers, 50 percent for the Internet, 49 percent for TV and 41
        percent for magazines
     *  Newspaper automotive ads scored a 61 percent satisfaction rating,
        compared with 53 percent for the Internet, 49 percent for TV and 44
        percent for magazines
 
     The entire 102-page report, "Leveraging Newspaper Assets," can be
 downloaded as a Portable Document Format file from NAA's Web site at
 http://www.naa.org/marketscope/index.html .
 
     Methodology: The study was based on a nationally representative sample of
 4,003 adults, 18 years of age and over. Interviewing was conducted between
 January 4 and February 7, 2000. The study revisits the same issues of media
 perception and usage explored in NAA's 1997 study, "So Many Choices, So Little
 Time." The total results carry a sampling error of approximately +2.5%.
     Working press interested in covering the NAA Annual Convention may
 register onsite in the NAA Press Office in Confederation Room 6 (mezzanine
 level) at The Fairmont Royal York Hotel beginning Saturday, April 28 at 9 a.m.
 Members of the press may be asked to show credentials, a copy of their
 publication showing their byline or name on the masthead, and/or a letter on
 company stationary from a top editor assigning them to cover the conference.
     Sponsors of NAA's 2001 Annual Convention are: American Profile; The Globe
 and Mail, Toronto; Goss Graphic Systems; Heidelberg Web Systems; KBA - North
 America; The Mutual Insurance Co. Ltd.; NEXPO(R) 2001; Parade Publications;
 Presstime; SAP America; The Toronto Star; USA Weekend; Veronis, Suhler &
 Associates Inc.; and Videoaxs.
 
     NAA is a nonprofit organization representing the $59 billion newspaper
 industry and more than 2,000 newspapers in the U.S. and Canada. Most NAA
 members are daily newspapers, accounting for 87 percent of the U.S. daily
 circulation. Headquartered in Tysons Corner (Vienna, Va.), the Association
 focuses on six key strategic priorities that affect the newspaper industry
 collectively: marketing, public policy, diversity, industry development,
 newspaper operations and readership. Information about NAA and the industry
 may also be found at the Association's World Wide Web site on the Internet
 (http://www.naa.org ).
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X65101865
 
 SOURCE  Newspaper Association of America