Newsweek Cover: 'The Next Frontiers: Business & Technology'

Cutting Edge Technological Advancements that Will Change Work Life Include

New Computer 'Tablets,' Credit Card Passports, Voice-Activated Virtual

Secretaries



Newsweek Names New Job Fields and Ten Hot Tech Cities: Oakland, San Diego,

Denver, D.C., Ventura, Akron, Huntsville, Dallas, Tulsa, Omaha



Apr 22, 2001, 01:00 ET from Newsweek

    NEW YORK, April 22 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- While the
 economy may be uncertain and dot-coms come and go, technological advancements
 are creating new fields, new gadgets, new ways of doing business and whole new
 fields of employment.  Newsweek's April 30 "Next Frontiers" issue (on
 newsstands Monday, April 23) focuses on the business world and launches the
 first installment of a new series of four special reports focusing on how
 cutting edge technologies and inventions will transform the way we work and
 live.
     (Photo:  http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20010422/NEWSWEEK )
     As part of the first special report, Newsweek names ten hot tech cities
 which have built their new economies with hard work and innovation: Oakland,
 San Diego, Denver, Washington, D. C., Ventura, Akron, Huntsville, Dallas,
 Tulsa, and Omaha. Newsweek chose the cities because they have combined a good
 base of science and technology companies with higher education institutions,
 and have governments that get and keep companies, all the while maintaining a
 good quality-of-life ratio.
     Newsweek also looks at the next new gadgets in the works or on the horizon
 that will facilitate the work experience and even take it out of the office
 including: an "affinity matching" business card with infrared technology that
 signals people out to you at conferences with the same business interests; a
 voice-controlled virtual assistant; credit card-like passports that are swiped
 at customs checkpoints while a camera scans the eye's iris and must match the
 one on your passport before you are allowed through; an easy to use, do-it-all
 computer "tablet" that goes anywhere and is as friendly as a piece of paper.
     The jobs of the future are also being shaped by technological
 advancements. Newsweek reports that the field of "bioinformatics," which
 scarcely existed a few years ago, is already a magnet for talented young
 workers. Bioinformatics involves the use of supercomputers, vast databases and
 complex software to analyze the mountain of data that has emerged from the
 sequencing of the human genome, and other biological processes. A dozen
 schools started bioinformatics centers last year, and tech giants are
 targeting it as one of the few growth sectors in today's economy. Technology
 Correspondent Brad Stone writes that proponents of the field claim it will
 change health care, by allowing pharmaceutical companies to shave years off
 the drug discovery process, and letting doctors tailor medicines to an
 individual's genetic makeup.
     The other installments in the Next Frontiers series will include issues on
 Health and Medicine, Learning, and Family Life.
 
                       (Read Newsweek's news releases at
              http://.www.Newsweek.MSNBC.com." Click "Pressroom.")
 
                      MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT - Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X33235787
 
 

SOURCE Newsweek
    NEW YORK, April 22 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- While the
 economy may be uncertain and dot-coms come and go, technological advancements
 are creating new fields, new gadgets, new ways of doing business and whole new
 fields of employment.  Newsweek's April 30 "Next Frontiers" issue (on
 newsstands Monday, April 23) focuses on the business world and launches the
 first installment of a new series of four special reports focusing on how
 cutting edge technologies and inventions will transform the way we work and
 live.
     (Photo:  http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20010422/NEWSWEEK )
     As part of the first special report, Newsweek names ten hot tech cities
 which have built their new economies with hard work and innovation: Oakland,
 San Diego, Denver, Washington, D. C., Ventura, Akron, Huntsville, Dallas,
 Tulsa, and Omaha. Newsweek chose the cities because they have combined a good
 base of science and technology companies with higher education institutions,
 and have governments that get and keep companies, all the while maintaining a
 good quality-of-life ratio.
     Newsweek also looks at the next new gadgets in the works or on the horizon
 that will facilitate the work experience and even take it out of the office
 including: an "affinity matching" business card with infrared technology that
 signals people out to you at conferences with the same business interests; a
 voice-controlled virtual assistant; credit card-like passports that are swiped
 at customs checkpoints while a camera scans the eye's iris and must match the
 one on your passport before you are allowed through; an easy to use, do-it-all
 computer "tablet" that goes anywhere and is as friendly as a piece of paper.
     The jobs of the future are also being shaped by technological
 advancements. Newsweek reports that the field of "bioinformatics," which
 scarcely existed a few years ago, is already a magnet for talented young
 workers. Bioinformatics involves the use of supercomputers, vast databases and
 complex software to analyze the mountain of data that has emerged from the
 sequencing of the human genome, and other biological processes. A dozen
 schools started bioinformatics centers last year, and tech giants are
 targeting it as one of the few growth sectors in today's economy. Technology
 Correspondent Brad Stone writes that proponents of the field claim it will
 change health care, by allowing pharmaceutical companies to shave years off
 the drug discovery process, and letting doctors tailor medicines to an
 individual's genetic makeup.
     The other installments in the Next Frontiers series will include issues on
 Health and Medicine, Learning, and Family Life.
 
                       (Read Newsweek's news releases at
              http://.www.Newsweek.MSNBC.com." Click "Pressroom.")
 
                      MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT - Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X33235787
 
 SOURCE  Newsweek