NFPA 'Strongly Supports' Funding In FY 2002 Budget For Food Safety Programs

Association Opposes New 'Regulatory Taxes' on Food Industry



Apr 11, 2001, 01:00 ET from National Food Processors Association

    WASHINGTON, April 11 /PRNewswire/ -- In testimony submitted to Congress on
 the Bush Administration's FY 2002 Budget, the National Food Processors
 Association (NFPA) strongly supported "adequate funding" for effective food
 safety programs by the Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Department of
 Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS).
     "NFPA supports the Administration's requested level of funding for FDA's
 food regulation activities, but recommends that priority be given to the areas
 of research, risk assessment, education and surveillance," said John Cady,
 NFPA's President and CEO.  "Such priority setting will ensure that the
 Agency's limited resources will be targeted toward reducing risk associated
 with foodborne illness."  Cady also noted that NFPA supports adequate
 resources for FSIS, but added that further reforms are needed at the Agency to
 ensure that "unnecessary layers of regulation are promptly removed."
     On April 10, NFPA provided formal testimony on the Administration's FY
 2002 Budget proposal to the Subcommittee on Agriculture, Rural Development,
 and Related Agencies of the House Committee on Appropriations, which oversees
 the budget for both FDA and FSIS.
     Cady pointed out that "The Administration's FY 2002 Budget proposes new
 user fees -- more appropriately described as 'regulatory taxes' -- that
 require food companies to pay for the privilege of being regulated.  Though
 NFPA applauds the Administration for not proposing new user fees for FSIS, the
 FY 2002 request does include $13.4 million in new, unauthorized user fees.
 This includes $8.1 million for import inspections and $5.3 million for export
 certifications, both of which are unauthorized under current statute."
     Cady stated "NFPA appreciates that the Committee repeatedly has rejected
 user fee proposals in past Administration budget requests, and recommends
 again that funding for food safety and regulatory programs should be borne
 through appropriated funds."
     While several federal agencies have responsibility for food safety and
 quality programs, "FDA and FSIS share the primary responsibility for food
 regulation," Cady said.  "NFPA, on behalf of our members, is focusing on
 increasing the resources and productivity of these authorities.  This year,
 NFPA has launched a long-term effort, along with other leading food trade
 associations, to seek additional funding for FDA's Center for Food Safety and
 Applied Nutrition (CFSAN) which, in real dollars, has had a steadily declining
 budget since 1973."
 
     Other points made by NFPA in its Congressional testimony included:
 
     * NFPA "strongly supports" the proposed FY 2002 increase of $1 million to
       strengthen CFSAN's scientific capabilities in regard to biotechnology,
       and requests the Committee provide an even higher level of funding for
       this important function.  "In January, FDA released a draft guidance on
       labeling of foods derived from biotechnology and a proposed rule on
       premarket notification," NFPA said in its testimony.  "NFPA supports the
       increased funds to assist in the expeditious publication of a final
       version of the guidance and rule to ensure the review process for
       biotechnology is thorough, rigorous and scientifically based."
 
     * NFPA endorses the new Administration's commitment to preventing the
       spread of Mad Cow Disease and Foot and Mouth Disease to the United
       States.
 
     * NFPA urges the Committee to review FSIS's personnel management practices
       "to ensure the availability of inspection personnel either through
       additional resources or management reforms, including alternative
       inspection procedures."  NFPA also urges the Committee "to ensure that
       unnecessary layers of regulation are promptly removed at FSIS to speed
       HACCP implementation."
 
     * NFPA recognizes the lead role that FSIS plays in overseeing the work of
       the U.S. Manager for Codex Alimentarius, and strongly supports the FY
       2002 requested increase for FSIS Codex activity.  "NFPA recommends that
       the Committee provide an even higher level of funding for this function,
       as Codex remains a critically important forum for ensuring U.S.
       leadership in international trade and food safety activities," NFPA
       noted in its testimony."
 
     * NFPA supports infrastructure request for funding to administer the
       transfer of CFSAN staff and facilities to College Park, Maryland and to
       construct a new regional laboratory in Los Angeles, California.
 
     "NFPA is grateful for the important funding oversight that the Committee
 provides to ensure the integrity of U.S. food safety regulation," Cady
 concluded.  "The food industry endeavors to produce the safest and highest
 quality food products in the world.  As a result, adequate funding for our
 nation's food safety regulators, through direct appropriations and enhanced
 productivity by the Agencies, is fundamental to good public health and to
 maintaining the confidence of consumers in the safety of the food supply."
 
     NFPA is the voice of the $460 billion food processing industry on
 scientific and public policy issues involving food safety, nutrition,
 technical and regulatory matters and consumer affairs.  For more information
 on this issue, contact Timothy Willard, NFPA's Vice President of
 Communications, at 202-637-8060, or visit NFPA's Website at
 http://www.nfpa-food.org .
 
 

SOURCE National Food Processors Association
    WASHINGTON, April 11 /PRNewswire/ -- In testimony submitted to Congress on
 the Bush Administration's FY 2002 Budget, the National Food Processors
 Association (NFPA) strongly supported "adequate funding" for effective food
 safety programs by the Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Department of
 Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS).
     "NFPA supports the Administration's requested level of funding for FDA's
 food regulation activities, but recommends that priority be given to the areas
 of research, risk assessment, education and surveillance," said John Cady,
 NFPA's President and CEO.  "Such priority setting will ensure that the
 Agency's limited resources will be targeted toward reducing risk associated
 with foodborne illness."  Cady also noted that NFPA supports adequate
 resources for FSIS, but added that further reforms are needed at the Agency to
 ensure that "unnecessary layers of regulation are promptly removed."
     On April 10, NFPA provided formal testimony on the Administration's FY
 2002 Budget proposal to the Subcommittee on Agriculture, Rural Development,
 and Related Agencies of the House Committee on Appropriations, which oversees
 the budget for both FDA and FSIS.
     Cady pointed out that "The Administration's FY 2002 Budget proposes new
 user fees -- more appropriately described as 'regulatory taxes' -- that
 require food companies to pay for the privilege of being regulated.  Though
 NFPA applauds the Administration for not proposing new user fees for FSIS, the
 FY 2002 request does include $13.4 million in new, unauthorized user fees.
 This includes $8.1 million for import inspections and $5.3 million for export
 certifications, both of which are unauthorized under current statute."
     Cady stated "NFPA appreciates that the Committee repeatedly has rejected
 user fee proposals in past Administration budget requests, and recommends
 again that funding for food safety and regulatory programs should be borne
 through appropriated funds."
     While several federal agencies have responsibility for food safety and
 quality programs, "FDA and FSIS share the primary responsibility for food
 regulation," Cady said.  "NFPA, on behalf of our members, is focusing on
 increasing the resources and productivity of these authorities.  This year,
 NFPA has launched a long-term effort, along with other leading food trade
 associations, to seek additional funding for FDA's Center for Food Safety and
 Applied Nutrition (CFSAN) which, in real dollars, has had a steadily declining
 budget since 1973."
 
     Other points made by NFPA in its Congressional testimony included:
 
     * NFPA "strongly supports" the proposed FY 2002 increase of $1 million to
       strengthen CFSAN's scientific capabilities in regard to biotechnology,
       and requests the Committee provide an even higher level of funding for
       this important function.  "In January, FDA released a draft guidance on
       labeling of foods derived from biotechnology and a proposed rule on
       premarket notification," NFPA said in its testimony.  "NFPA supports the
       increased funds to assist in the expeditious publication of a final
       version of the guidance and rule to ensure the review process for
       biotechnology is thorough, rigorous and scientifically based."
 
     * NFPA endorses the new Administration's commitment to preventing the
       spread of Mad Cow Disease and Foot and Mouth Disease to the United
       States.
 
     * NFPA urges the Committee to review FSIS's personnel management practices
       "to ensure the availability of inspection personnel either through
       additional resources or management reforms, including alternative
       inspection procedures."  NFPA also urges the Committee "to ensure that
       unnecessary layers of regulation are promptly removed at FSIS to speed
       HACCP implementation."
 
     * NFPA recognizes the lead role that FSIS plays in overseeing the work of
       the U.S. Manager for Codex Alimentarius, and strongly supports the FY
       2002 requested increase for FSIS Codex activity.  "NFPA recommends that
       the Committee provide an even higher level of funding for this function,
       as Codex remains a critically important forum for ensuring U.S.
       leadership in international trade and food safety activities," NFPA
       noted in its testimony."
 
     * NFPA supports infrastructure request for funding to administer the
       transfer of CFSAN staff and facilities to College Park, Maryland and to
       construct a new regional laboratory in Los Angeles, California.
 
     "NFPA is grateful for the important funding oversight that the Committee
 provides to ensure the integrity of U.S. food safety regulation," Cady
 concluded.  "The food industry endeavors to produce the safest and highest
 quality food products in the world.  As a result, adequate funding for our
 nation's food safety regulators, through direct appropriations and enhanced
 productivity by the Agencies, is fundamental to good public health and to
 maintaining the confidence of consumers in the safety of the food supply."
 
     NFPA is the voice of the $460 billion food processing industry on
 scientific and public policy issues involving food safety, nutrition,
 technical and regulatory matters and consumer affairs.  For more information
 on this issue, contact Timothy Willard, NFPA's Vice President of
 Communications, at 202-637-8060, or visit NFPA's Website at
 http://www.nfpa-food.org .
 
 SOURCE  National Food Processors Association