No Evidence to Link Breast Implants and Cancer, Says American Society of Plastic Surgeons

Apr 27, 2001, 01:00 ET from American Society of Plastic Surgeons

    ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, Ill., April 27 /PRNewswire/ -- Women with breast
 implants should be reassured by the consistency of scientific studies that
 have uniformly found they are not at increased risk for cancer, reports a
 study in the May issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery(R) (PRS), the
 official journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).
     The authors reviewed the available scientific literature on three topic
 areas:  the risk for cancer (both breast and other cancers), the risk for
 delayed detection of breast cancer, and the risk for increased breast cancer
 recurrence.
     "Research from around the world suggests that these concerns are
 unwarranted," said lead author Susan J. Hoshaw, PhD.  "There is ample evidence
 from the published literature on breast implants to support the lack of a
 causal association between breast implants and cancer."
     Hoshaw further noted that the Institute of Medicine concluded in May 2000
 "after an extensive literature review on the safety of breast implants that
 'Evidence clearly shows that silicone breast implants do not cause breast
 cancer.  In fact, some studies suggest that women with breast implants have
 fewer new or recurring cancers.'"
     The PRS study, Breast Implants and Cancer:  Causation, Delayed Detection
 and Survival, will be published the same month as a study claiming to have
 found a link between breast implants and cancer.  The study claiming a link,
 which contradicts all scientific literature previously published, will appear
 in the May issues of Epidemiology and Annals of Epidemiology.
     "The science available so far clearly shows there is no association
 between breast implants and any type of cancer," said Walter Erhardt, MD, ASPS
 president.  "To sensationalize the findings of one study misrepresents the
 data and is a disservice to patients and the public."
     The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Scientific Advisory Panel has been
 reviewing the Epidemiology study.  One NCI panel member and ASPS member Thomas
 Mustoe, MD, professor in chief at Northwestern University, said, "The excess
 of cancers found in the Epidemiology study are more likely due to chance than
 a true association with implants."
     ASPS, celebrating its 70th anniversary, was founded in 1931.  The leading
 authority on the specialty of plastic surgery, it is the largest plastic
 surgery organization in the world, representing physicians certified by the
 American Board of Plastic Surgery (ABPS) or the Royal College of Physicians
 and Surgeons of Canada.  To find an ABPS-certified plastic surgeon in your
 area or to learn more about cosmetic and reconstructive surgery, call the
 Plastic Surgery Information Service at (888) 4-PLASTIC (1-888-475-2784) or
 visit www.plasticsurgery.org .
 
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SOURCE American Society of Plastic Surgeons
    ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, Ill., April 27 /PRNewswire/ -- Women with breast
 implants should be reassured by the consistency of scientific studies that
 have uniformly found they are not at increased risk for cancer, reports a
 study in the May issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery(R) (PRS), the
 official journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).
     The authors reviewed the available scientific literature on three topic
 areas:  the risk for cancer (both breast and other cancers), the risk for
 delayed detection of breast cancer, and the risk for increased breast cancer
 recurrence.
     "Research from around the world suggests that these concerns are
 unwarranted," said lead author Susan J. Hoshaw, PhD.  "There is ample evidence
 from the published literature on breast implants to support the lack of a
 causal association between breast implants and cancer."
     Hoshaw further noted that the Institute of Medicine concluded in May 2000
 "after an extensive literature review on the safety of breast implants that
 'Evidence clearly shows that silicone breast implants do not cause breast
 cancer.  In fact, some studies suggest that women with breast implants have
 fewer new or recurring cancers.'"
     The PRS study, Breast Implants and Cancer:  Causation, Delayed Detection
 and Survival, will be published the same month as a study claiming to have
 found a link between breast implants and cancer.  The study claiming a link,
 which contradicts all scientific literature previously published, will appear
 in the May issues of Epidemiology and Annals of Epidemiology.
     "The science available so far clearly shows there is no association
 between breast implants and any type of cancer," said Walter Erhardt, MD, ASPS
 president.  "To sensationalize the findings of one study misrepresents the
 data and is a disservice to patients and the public."
     The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Scientific Advisory Panel has been
 reviewing the Epidemiology study.  One NCI panel member and ASPS member Thomas
 Mustoe, MD, professor in chief at Northwestern University, said, "The excess
 of cancers found in the Epidemiology study are more likely due to chance than
 a true association with implants."
     ASPS, celebrating its 70th anniversary, was founded in 1931.  The leading
 authority on the specialty of plastic surgery, it is the largest plastic
 surgery organization in the world, representing physicians certified by the
 American Board of Plastic Surgery (ABPS) or the Royal College of Physicians
 and Surgeons of Canada.  To find an ABPS-certified plastic surgeon in your
 area or to learn more about cosmetic and reconstructive surgery, call the
 Plastic Surgery Information Service at (888) 4-PLASTIC (1-888-475-2784) or
 visit www.plasticsurgery.org .
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X63565211
 
 SOURCE  American Society of Plastic Surgeons