OSMA Applauds ODI for Market Conduct Study

Apr 12, 2001, 01:00 ET from Ohio State Medical Association

    COLUMBUS, Ohio, April 12 /PRNewswire/ -- Ohio State Medical Association
 (OSMA), a group representing Ohio physicians, expressed support today for an
 Ohio Department of Insurance (ODI) decision to levy fines against a number of
 insurance companies for failing to reimburse physicians and other health-care
 providers promptly.
     ODI recently released the results of a market conduct study it conducted
 that examined how well the state's insurance companies are complying with the
 state's current prompt pay law.  The study found that a significant number of
 Ohio insurance companies have failed to reimburse physicians and other health-
 care providers in the 24-day period as is now required by law.  ODI has levied
 fines against seven Ohio insurers totaling $545,000.
     "Timely reimbursement by insurance companies for services provided to
 patients is important to physicians," says OSMA President Walter J.
 Wielkiewicz, MD, in response to the ODI's finding.  "When insurance companies
 pay claims late, physicians may not have the resources available to them to
 continue to provide quality care to the patient.  This can result in a
 disruption for the patient in continuity of care, patient confusion regarding
 billing issues and ultimately, increased health-care costs."
     Dr. Wielkiewicz says the ODI study clearly demonstrates the need for
 passage of Senate Bill 4 (SB 4) which the OSMA supports. The legislation will
 give more teeth to the state's current prompt pay law.  Senate Bill 4 requires
 insurers to reimburse physicians for error free claims within 30 days and to
 pay interest to physicians for late payment of claims.  The bill also prevents
 insurers from pursuing alleged overpayments made to providers, sometimes years
 in the past. SB 4 would prohibit payers from "taking back" payments that were
 older than one year.
     "We applaud the insurance department for the fine work it is doing as the
 state's insurance regulator," says Dr. Wielkiewicz.  "The issue of prompt pay
 to physicians is really one about fairness," he adds.  "Once doctors have done
 their jobs and provided the care to the patient, all we're asking is that the
 insurance companies do theirs."
 
 

SOURCE Ohio State Medical Association
    COLUMBUS, Ohio, April 12 /PRNewswire/ -- Ohio State Medical Association
 (OSMA), a group representing Ohio physicians, expressed support today for an
 Ohio Department of Insurance (ODI) decision to levy fines against a number of
 insurance companies for failing to reimburse physicians and other health-care
 providers promptly.
     ODI recently released the results of a market conduct study it conducted
 that examined how well the state's insurance companies are complying with the
 state's current prompt pay law.  The study found that a significant number of
 Ohio insurance companies have failed to reimburse physicians and other health-
 care providers in the 24-day period as is now required by law.  ODI has levied
 fines against seven Ohio insurers totaling $545,000.
     "Timely reimbursement by insurance companies for services provided to
 patients is important to physicians," says OSMA President Walter J.
 Wielkiewicz, MD, in response to the ODI's finding.  "When insurance companies
 pay claims late, physicians may not have the resources available to them to
 continue to provide quality care to the patient.  This can result in a
 disruption for the patient in continuity of care, patient confusion regarding
 billing issues and ultimately, increased health-care costs."
     Dr. Wielkiewicz says the ODI study clearly demonstrates the need for
 passage of Senate Bill 4 (SB 4) which the OSMA supports. The legislation will
 give more teeth to the state's current prompt pay law.  Senate Bill 4 requires
 insurers to reimburse physicians for error free claims within 30 days and to
 pay interest to physicians for late payment of claims.  The bill also prevents
 insurers from pursuing alleged overpayments made to providers, sometimes years
 in the past. SB 4 would prohibit payers from "taking back" payments that were
 older than one year.
     "We applaud the insurance department for the fine work it is doing as the
 state's insurance regulator," says Dr. Wielkiewicz.  "The issue of prompt pay
 to physicians is really one about fairness," he adds.  "Once doctors have done
 their jobs and provided the care to the patient, all we're asking is that the
 insurance companies do theirs."
 
 SOURCE  Ohio State Medical Association