Overseas Press Club Presents 20 International Reporting Awards

Apr 26, 2001, 01:00 ET from Overseas Press Club

    NEW YORK, April 26 /PRNewswire/ -- Journalists from more than a dozen news
 organizations were honored with distinguished international reporting,
 writing, cartooning and photography awards by the Overseas Press Club of
 America at the OPC's 62nd Annual Awards Dinner Thursday night.
     The 19 Awards for outstanding international coverage by newspapers, wire
 services, magazines, books, radio, television, photography, cartoons and
 online journalism awards were presented by CBS Evening News Anchor Dan Rather.
     The Washington Post garnered four awards while The New York Times Magazine
 and NBC each won two. Those and other awards honored courageous coverage of
 stories around the world, ranging from the savage internal conflicts in Sierre
 Leone, Kosovo and East Timor, to the AIDS epidemic in Africa and political
 turmoil and repression in China and Russia.
     In addition, a new OPC award for outstanding reporting by a Russian
 journalist--the Artyom Borovik Award, was won by Anna Politkovskaya of Novaya
 Gazeta for her coverage of the war in Chechnya.
     The OPC's President's Award was presented to David Remnick, editor of
 The New Yorker, who delivered the keynote speech.
 
     The other 19 distinguished awards and the recipients were:
     -- The Hal Boyle Award for best newspaper or wire service reporting:
        Ian Johnson, The Wall Street Journal; for coverage of political
        repression in China.
     -- The Bob Considine Award for best newspaper or wire service
        interpretation of international affairs: Barton Gellman,
        The Washington Post; for a series on the AIDS crisis in Africa.
     -- The Robert Capa Gold Medal Award for best photographic reporting from
        abroad requiring exceptional courage and enterprise: Chris Anderson,
        Aurora for The New York Times Magazine; for covering the dangerous boat
        trip to freedom by Haitian refugees.
     -- The Olivier Rebbot Award for best photographic reporting in magazines
        and books: Eugene Richards, The New York Times Magazine; for his stark
        photo study of life in a Mexican asylum.
     -- The John Faber Award for best photographic reporting in newspapers  and
        wire services: Michel duCille, The Washington Post; for portraying the
        devastated victims of the conflict in Sierra Leone on
        The Washington Post website.
     -- The Lowell Thomas Award for best radio news or interpretation of
        international affairs: Stephen Smith, Michael Montgomery and
        Deborah George, American Radio Works/Minnesota Public Radio/NPR News;
        for a documentary on Serbian atrocities in Kosovo and the pursuit of
        those responsible.
     -- The David Kaplan Award for best television spot news reporting:
        Ron Allen, Bob Arnot, Bob Faw and Kevin Tibbles, NBC Nightly News; for
        coverage of the floods in Mozambique which claimed more than 700 lives.
     -- The Edward R. Murrow Award for best television interpretation or
        documentary on international affairs: Sherry Jones, Martin Smith,
        Michael Sullivan and David Fanning, Washington Media Associates for
        Frontline/WGBH Boston; for their account of the errors,
        miscalculations, and corruption in Russia as it moved from communism
        toward democratic rule.
     -- The Ed Cunningham Memorial Award for best magazine reporting:
        Steve Coll, The Washington Post Magazine; for a vivid account of the
        conflict consuming Sierra Leone.
     -- The Thomas Nast Award for best cartoons on international affairs: Signe
        Wilkinson, Philadelphia Daily News; for cartoons capturing the essence
        of complex events, such as the failed peace process in the Middle East,
        the threat of global warming and India's bride burnings.
     -- The Morton Frank Award for best business reporting for magazines:
        Andrew Tanzer, Forbes; for exposing the costly failure of quotas for
        protecting the American textile industry.
     -- The Malcolm Forbes Award for best business reporting in newspapers or
        wire services: Joe Stephens, Deborah Nelson, Mary Pat Flaherty, Karen
        DeYoung, John Pomfret, Sharon LaFraniere and Doug Struck,
        The Washington Post; for a series on testing of pharmaceuticals on
        unsuspecting foreign subjects.
     -- The Carl Spielvogel Award for best business reporting in the broadcast
        media: Dawn Fratangelo and Shachar Bar-On, Dateline NBC; for an
        investigative report on how the former Chase National Bank raised
        millions of dollars for Hitler's Third Reich between 1936 and 1941.
     -- The Cornelius Ryan Award for best non-fiction book on international
        affairs: A. J. Langguth, Simon & Schuster; for
        "Our Vietnam: The War 1954--1975."
     -- The Madeline Dane Ross Award for best international reporting in any
        medium showing a concern for the human condition: Laurie Garrett,
        Hyperion/Newsday; for reporting on the collapse of public health
        systems in Africa, Russia, India and the United States.
     -- The Eric and Amy Burger Award for best international reporting in the
        broadcast media dealing with human rights: Sorious Samura,
        Ron McCullagh and Elizabeth Ground, CNN Productions and Insight News
        Television; for a documentary on murders, amputations and atrocities
        during the sacking of Freetown, Sierre Leone, by rebel forces in
        January 1999.
     -- The Joe and Laurie Dine Award for best international reporting in the
        print medium dealing with human rights: Cameron W. Barr,
        The Christian Science Monitor; for a four-part series documenting the
        slaughter by Indonesian Army battalion 745 as it withdrew from
        East Timor leaving 21 people dead, including Monitor contributor
        Sander Thoenes.
     -- The Whitman Bassow Award for best reporting in any medium on
        environmental issues: Tom Horton, Heather Dewar and Frank Langfitt,
        The Baltimore Sun; for exposing how the environment is being damaged
        globally by fertilizer runoff.
     -- The Robert Spiers Benjamin Award for best reporting in any medium on
        Latin America: Peter Van Sant, Susan Zirinsky, Al Briganti,
        Patti Aronofsky, Shoshanah Wolfson, Chuck Stevenson, Bob Orozovich,
        Mead Stone and Alberto Moya, CBS News-48 Hours; for a documentary on
        American Lori Berenson, serving a life sentence in Peru for treason
        stemming from her alleged involvement with a terrorist group.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -- Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X51616456
 
 

SOURCE Overseas Press Club
    NEW YORK, April 26 /PRNewswire/ -- Journalists from more than a dozen news
 organizations were honored with distinguished international reporting,
 writing, cartooning and photography awards by the Overseas Press Club of
 America at the OPC's 62nd Annual Awards Dinner Thursday night.
     The 19 Awards for outstanding international coverage by newspapers, wire
 services, magazines, books, radio, television, photography, cartoons and
 online journalism awards were presented by CBS Evening News Anchor Dan Rather.
     The Washington Post garnered four awards while The New York Times Magazine
 and NBC each won two. Those and other awards honored courageous coverage of
 stories around the world, ranging from the savage internal conflicts in Sierre
 Leone, Kosovo and East Timor, to the AIDS epidemic in Africa and political
 turmoil and repression in China and Russia.
     In addition, a new OPC award for outstanding reporting by a Russian
 journalist--the Artyom Borovik Award, was won by Anna Politkovskaya of Novaya
 Gazeta for her coverage of the war in Chechnya.
     The OPC's President's Award was presented to David Remnick, editor of
 The New Yorker, who delivered the keynote speech.
 
     The other 19 distinguished awards and the recipients were:
     -- The Hal Boyle Award for best newspaper or wire service reporting:
        Ian Johnson, The Wall Street Journal; for coverage of political
        repression in China.
     -- The Bob Considine Award for best newspaper or wire service
        interpretation of international affairs: Barton Gellman,
        The Washington Post; for a series on the AIDS crisis in Africa.
     -- The Robert Capa Gold Medal Award for best photographic reporting from
        abroad requiring exceptional courage and enterprise: Chris Anderson,
        Aurora for The New York Times Magazine; for covering the dangerous boat
        trip to freedom by Haitian refugees.
     -- The Olivier Rebbot Award for best photographic reporting in magazines
        and books: Eugene Richards, The New York Times Magazine; for his stark
        photo study of life in a Mexican asylum.
     -- The John Faber Award for best photographic reporting in newspapers  and
        wire services: Michel duCille, The Washington Post; for portraying the
        devastated victims of the conflict in Sierra Leone on
        The Washington Post website.
     -- The Lowell Thomas Award for best radio news or interpretation of
        international affairs: Stephen Smith, Michael Montgomery and
        Deborah George, American Radio Works/Minnesota Public Radio/NPR News;
        for a documentary on Serbian atrocities in Kosovo and the pursuit of
        those responsible.
     -- The David Kaplan Award for best television spot news reporting:
        Ron Allen, Bob Arnot, Bob Faw and Kevin Tibbles, NBC Nightly News; for
        coverage of the floods in Mozambique which claimed more than 700 lives.
     -- The Edward R. Murrow Award for best television interpretation or
        documentary on international affairs: Sherry Jones, Martin Smith,
        Michael Sullivan and David Fanning, Washington Media Associates for
        Frontline/WGBH Boston; for their account of the errors,
        miscalculations, and corruption in Russia as it moved from communism
        toward democratic rule.
     -- The Ed Cunningham Memorial Award for best magazine reporting:
        Steve Coll, The Washington Post Magazine; for a vivid account of the
        conflict consuming Sierra Leone.
     -- The Thomas Nast Award for best cartoons on international affairs: Signe
        Wilkinson, Philadelphia Daily News; for cartoons capturing the essence
        of complex events, such as the failed peace process in the Middle East,
        the threat of global warming and India's bride burnings.
     -- The Morton Frank Award for best business reporting for magazines:
        Andrew Tanzer, Forbes; for exposing the costly failure of quotas for
        protecting the American textile industry.
     -- The Malcolm Forbes Award for best business reporting in newspapers or
        wire services: Joe Stephens, Deborah Nelson, Mary Pat Flaherty, Karen
        DeYoung, John Pomfret, Sharon LaFraniere and Doug Struck,
        The Washington Post; for a series on testing of pharmaceuticals on
        unsuspecting foreign subjects.
     -- The Carl Spielvogel Award for best business reporting in the broadcast
        media: Dawn Fratangelo and Shachar Bar-On, Dateline NBC; for an
        investigative report on how the former Chase National Bank raised
        millions of dollars for Hitler's Third Reich between 1936 and 1941.
     -- The Cornelius Ryan Award for best non-fiction book on international
        affairs: A. J. Langguth, Simon & Schuster; for
        "Our Vietnam: The War 1954--1975."
     -- The Madeline Dane Ross Award for best international reporting in any
        medium showing a concern for the human condition: Laurie Garrett,
        Hyperion/Newsday; for reporting on the collapse of public health
        systems in Africa, Russia, India and the United States.
     -- The Eric and Amy Burger Award for best international reporting in the
        broadcast media dealing with human rights: Sorious Samura,
        Ron McCullagh and Elizabeth Ground, CNN Productions and Insight News
        Television; for a documentary on murders, amputations and atrocities
        during the sacking of Freetown, Sierre Leone, by rebel forces in
        January 1999.
     -- The Joe and Laurie Dine Award for best international reporting in the
        print medium dealing with human rights: Cameron W. Barr,
        The Christian Science Monitor; for a four-part series documenting the
        slaughter by Indonesian Army battalion 745 as it withdrew from
        East Timor leaving 21 people dead, including Monitor contributor
        Sander Thoenes.
     -- The Whitman Bassow Award for best reporting in any medium on
        environmental issues: Tom Horton, Heather Dewar and Frank Langfitt,
        The Baltimore Sun; for exposing how the environment is being damaged
        globally by fertilizer runoff.
     -- The Robert Spiers Benjamin Award for best reporting in any medium on
        Latin America: Peter Van Sant, Susan Zirinsky, Al Briganti,
        Patti Aronofsky, Shoshanah Wolfson, Chuck Stevenson, Bob Orozovich,
        Mead Stone and Alberto Moya, CBS News-48 Hours; for a documentary on
        American Lori Berenson, serving a life sentence in Peru for treason
        stemming from her alleged involvement with a terrorist group.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -- Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X51616456
 
 SOURCE  Overseas Press Club