PA DEP Announces 2001 Waste Watcher Award Winners

Apr 04, 2001, 01:00 ET from Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection

    HARRISBURG, Pa., April 4 /PRNewswire/ -- On behalf of Gov. Tom Ridge,
 Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) Acting Secretary David E. Hess
 today presented Pennsylvania Waste Watcher Awards to individuals,
 organizations, municipalities and businesses, recognizing their outstanding
 efforts in recycling last year.
     "Today, we say thank you to each of the 100 people and organizations who
 won this year's Waste Watcher awards," Hess said.  "Thanks to you, recycling
 works for Pennsylvania, and we can achieve our goal of recycling 35 percent of
 our waste by 2003."
     The awards were presented during a ceremony in Harrisburg, with 100
 organizations from 32 counties being recognized.
     "Organizations like food banks, Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts, counties, and
 municipalities today have proven that recycling and reducing waste not only
 help keep our environment clean, but reduce trash-disposal costs as well,"
 Hess said.
     For example, the Delaware County Solid Waste Authority collected more than
 3,000 old cellular phones and donated them to domestic-abuse programs.
 Armstrong County's Girl Scout Troop No. 916 and Den No. 5 Webelos Scouts
 collect newspapers, linens and towels and deliver them to a local animal
 shelter for reuse.
     The Waste Watcher Awards are given in nine different categories:  Curbside
 Recycling Collection; Drop-Off Recycling; Pay-As-You-Throw Programs;
 Commercial/Institutional Recycling; Recycling Education Programs; Materials
 Recovery Facilities; Recycled Product Manufacturers; Composting Facility; and
 Reuse. The Reuse category is new for 2001, recognizing those who promote the
 redistribution of unwanted goods or materials to those who can use them.
     The awards are co-sponsored by DEP, the Professional Recyclers of
 Pennsylvania (PROP) and the Pennsylvania Waste Industries Association (PWIA).
 Joining Hess in presenting the awards were John Frederick, Executive Director
 of PROP, and Harry Smith, President of PWIA.
     For more information on the Waste Watcher Awards or recycling, visit DEP
 through the PA PowerPort at www.state.pa.us or directly at www.dep.state.pa.us
 (directLINK "recycling" or "Waste Watcher").
 
     EDITOR'S NOTE:  Following is a list of the Waste Watcher Award winners by
 county.
 
                 DEP ANNOUNCES 2001 WASTE WATCHER AWARD WINNERS
 
     Allegheny County:  Goodwill Industries of Pittsburgh, for selling and
 recycling donated clothing, computers and electronics; Greater Pittsburgh
 Community Food Bank, for serving as a central collection facility for 500,000
 pounds per month of donated dented cans and other damaged products; and the
 Pennsylvania Resources Council, for its work with WasteCap of Allegheny County
 to promote voluntary recycling and waste-reduction practices.
 
     Armstrong County:  Girl Scout Troop No. 916, for reuse efforts that
 include collecting clothing for Goodwill Industries, and also collecting
 newspapers, linens and towels for animal shelters; and Den No. 5 Webelos
 Scouts, for collecting towels, linens and newspapers for animal shelters, and
 donating proceeds from recycling aluminum cans to the shelters.
 
     Berks County:  Vanity Fair Outlet Village, for providing recycling
 education to its tenants, an aggressive buy-recycled policy and recovering
 scrap metal and compost on site; and Boy Scout Troop No. 505, for a unique
 bicycle-recovery program.
 
     Blair County:  Blair County Department of Solid Waste, for its yard-waste
 and composting facility that is open year-round to residents; and Spring Cove
 Middle School, for an eighth-grade project that started a paper-recycling
 program to complement the school's beverage-container collection.
 
     Bucks County:  Pennsbury High School and Wheelabrator Falls Inc., for
 revamping a recycling program by adding aluminum and paper-recycling
 containers to the school's paper-recycling program; FDR Middle School and
 Wheelabrator Falls Inc., for community-recycling information pieces designed
 by students and other recycling efforts at the school; and Waste Management,
 Bucks County Courier Times, Doylestown Intelligencer Record, Oxford Valley
 Mall and Montgomery Mall, for their recycling education efforts.
 
     Cambria County:  Cambria County Solid Waste Authority, for an expanded
 recycling collection program and outreach efforts.
 
     Carbon County:  Carbon County Department of Solid Waste, for a
 comprehensive recycling education program in elementary schools; and Carbon
 County Environmental Education Center, for its waste-reduction program aimed
 at elementary students.
 
     Centre County:  State College, for its composting facility;
 Waste Management of State College, Centre Region Council of Governments,
 Centre Region Solid Waste Management Authority, for a Christmas-tree
 collection program; Penn State University Office of Physical Plant, Office of
 Housing & Food Services and Office of Residence Life, for successful promotion
 of recycling; The Autoport, for diverting recyclables from the waste stream
 and minimal contamination of recycled materials; Ponderosa Steak House, for
 cleaning and sorting recyclables; Philipsburg-Osceola Junior High School, for
 being an enthusiastic composting institution; Bellefonte Area High School, for
 efforts to implement recycling in classrooms and the cafeteria; Pennsylvania
 Fish and Boat Commission, for an excellent recycling program; Juniata Valley
 Council of the Boy Scouts of America, for using Seven Mountains Boy Scout Camp
 as a recycling drop-off location; State College and Centre County Solid Waste
 Management Authority, for making on-street recycling a reality; Centre Peace
 Inc., for using prison labor to restore old, broken furniture and appliances;
 Tait Farm Food Community Harvest, for recycling cracked and broken recycling
 bins, and using them as produce bins; Centre Region Council of Governments,
 for promoting recycling through public service announcements and successful
 collection programs; Penn State Computer Hardware Initiative Project, for
 repairing donated computer equipment and giving it to the needy, handicapped
 and local schools; Penn State Department of Agriculture and Extension
 Education, for recycling Christmas-card fronts, license plates, and paper and
 for other reuse ideas; and Centre County Solid Waste Management Authority, for
 its extensive recycling program.
 
     Chester County:  Recycling Services Inc., for a recycling program that
 collects 45 different materials; West Chester University, for a campus-wide
 collection program, including collections during sporting events; and
 Downingtown Area School District, for a recycling program that includes
 collecting paper from classrooms and beverage containers from food-service
 areas.
 
     Clinton County:  Clinton County Solid Waste Authority, for its countywide
 recycling program.
 
     Columbia County:  Town of Bloomsburg, for its continued leadership as
 Pennsylvania's oldest curbside recycling program.
 
     Cumberland County:  Lower Allen Township Composting Facility, for its
 collection and education program; Camp Hill, for its comprehensive yard-waste
 collection and recycling program; Hampden Township, for its comprehensive
 curbside collection and leaf and yard-waste program; Pennsylvania Association
 of Goodwills, for repairing and reselling donated consumer goods; and Solid
 Waste Authority of Cumberland County, for its comprehensive recycling
 education program.
 
     Delaware County:  Delaware County Solid Waste Authority, for collecting
 and donating 3,000 cellular phones.
 
     Erie County:  Millcreek Township, for building on its existing recycling
 program and starting a composting education program.
 
     Franklin County:  Boy Scout Troop No. 128, for starting and maintaining a
 voluntary newspaper and aluminum-can collection program; and Washington
 Township Recycling Center, for being the most significant recycling center in
 the county.
 
     Lackawanna County:  Dunmore School District, for paper, bottle and can
 recycling and composting efforts; Everything Natural, for selling products
 made from recycled materials and recycling education; Cooper's Seafood House,
 for its commitment to recycling and buying and using products made from
 recycled materials; Moscow, for its organized curbside collection program;
 University of Scranton, for its successful recycling program in place since
 1990; Lackawanna County Recycling Center, for its comprehensive recycling and
 outreach program; and Olyphant, for promoting recycling to new and current
 residents.
 
     Lancaster County:  Mount Joy, for its weekly curbside collection program;
 Mount Joy Township, for its comprehensive curbside collection program;
 Lancaster County Solid Waste Management Authority, for its long-running drop-
 off program; Manheim, for its curbside, leaf collection and outreach programs;
 City of Lancaster, for outreach with the city's recycling message to 3,000
 students; Jeff Stoltzfus and Adam Zook, for collecting agricultural plastic
 and using it for composite lumber; The Barn Saver, for dismantling barns and
 recovering most of the materials; and Ephrata, for aggressively educating
 residents about buying recycled.
 
     Lawrence County:  Lawrence County Environmental Services (LCES), for
 establishing a multi-municipality residential recycling education program.
 
     Lebanon County:  North Lebanon Township, for its recycling program that
 collects seven materials at curbside and offers a newspaper drop off each
 month; Jackson Township and TNT Sanitation Inc., for recycling more than 300
 tons of material at a savings of more than $18,000 in landfill tipping fees;
 and Greater Lebanon Refuse Authority, for its "Saving Center" that accepts all
 Act 101 recycled materials and its brochure, The Recycling Roundup.
 
     Lehigh County: City of Allentown, for its public education campaign and
 effective enforcement program, which have resulted in a participation rate of
 95 percent; and Lehigh County Office of Solid Waste Management, for its
 Household Hazardous Waste Program, which offers periodic curbside collection.
 
     Luzerne County:  Luzerne County, for publishing the sixth edition of the
 Luzerne County Recycling Guide; and Exeter, for offering drop-off recycling
 services to communities without recycling programs.
 
     Mercer County: Mercer County Builders Association, Mercer County Solid
 Waste Authority, Mercer County Regional Planning Commission, Fredonia, for
 holding a "Recycle Everything Possible" collection event.
 
     Mifflin County: Lewistown, for its curbside recycling program.
 
     Monroe County:   Monroe County Municipal Waste Management Authority, for
 its Household Hazardous Waste Program, which offers periodic curbside
 collection; and Tobyhanna Army Depot, for grass cycling, composting and other
 recycling efforts that reduced waste by 82 percent.
 
     Montgomery County:  Creative Artists' Resource Project and Philadelphia
 Dumpster Divers, for creating a materials exchange where artists bring in
 unwanted materials and receive credits toward shopping for other used
 materials; Upper Merion Township, for its quarterly recycling newsletter, The
 Township Lines; Emanuel Tire of Pennsylvania Inc., for recycling almost 95
 percent of its used and scrap tires; and Penn State Cooperative Extension and
 Montgomery County Office, for publishing and distributing its seasonal
 Earthworm newsletter.
 
     Northampton County: Pen Argyl, for distributing its quarterly Pen Argyl
 Update newsletter; Northampton County, for its Household Hazardous Waste
 Program, which offers periodic curbside collection; and the City of Bethlehem,
 for a comprehensive recycling program.
 
     Schuylkill County:  Schuylkill County, for its Household Hazardous Waste
 Program, which offers periodic curbside collection; and Hegins Township Board
 of Supervisors and Midway Supermarket, for diverting 200 tons of recyclables
 in 2000, using excellent signage and secure and well-maintained sites.
 
     Susquehanna County: Silver Lake Township, for being the first municipality
 in Susquehanna County to require recycling.
 
     Washington County:  East Washington and Washington & Jefferson College,
 for distributing an educational flier and magnet to more than 900 households
 and printing a recycling brochure aimed at approximately 150 Washington &
 Jefferson College students living off campus.
 
     Westmoreland County:  Plum and Waste Management of Pennsylvania, North
 Huntingdon Division, for partnering to sponsor a series of drop-off events for
 special materials five times during 2000.
 
     York County:  Penn Township Board of Commissioners, for promoting the
 township's Pay-As-You-Throw program through newsletters, door hangers,
 stickers and a page on the township website.
 
      CONTACT:  Jeff McCloud
                Deputy Press Secretary
                (717) 787-1323
 
 

SOURCE Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection
    HARRISBURG, Pa., April 4 /PRNewswire/ -- On behalf of Gov. Tom Ridge,
 Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) Acting Secretary David E. Hess
 today presented Pennsylvania Waste Watcher Awards to individuals,
 organizations, municipalities and businesses, recognizing their outstanding
 efforts in recycling last year.
     "Today, we say thank you to each of the 100 people and organizations who
 won this year's Waste Watcher awards," Hess said.  "Thanks to you, recycling
 works for Pennsylvania, and we can achieve our goal of recycling 35 percent of
 our waste by 2003."
     The awards were presented during a ceremony in Harrisburg, with 100
 organizations from 32 counties being recognized.
     "Organizations like food banks, Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts, counties, and
 municipalities today have proven that recycling and reducing waste not only
 help keep our environment clean, but reduce trash-disposal costs as well,"
 Hess said.
     For example, the Delaware County Solid Waste Authority collected more than
 3,000 old cellular phones and donated them to domestic-abuse programs.
 Armstrong County's Girl Scout Troop No. 916 and Den No. 5 Webelos Scouts
 collect newspapers, linens and towels and deliver them to a local animal
 shelter for reuse.
     The Waste Watcher Awards are given in nine different categories:  Curbside
 Recycling Collection; Drop-Off Recycling; Pay-As-You-Throw Programs;
 Commercial/Institutional Recycling; Recycling Education Programs; Materials
 Recovery Facilities; Recycled Product Manufacturers; Composting Facility; and
 Reuse. The Reuse category is new for 2001, recognizing those who promote the
 redistribution of unwanted goods or materials to those who can use them.
     The awards are co-sponsored by DEP, the Professional Recyclers of
 Pennsylvania (PROP) and the Pennsylvania Waste Industries Association (PWIA).
 Joining Hess in presenting the awards were John Frederick, Executive Director
 of PROP, and Harry Smith, President of PWIA.
     For more information on the Waste Watcher Awards or recycling, visit DEP
 through the PA PowerPort at www.state.pa.us or directly at www.dep.state.pa.us
 (directLINK "recycling" or "Waste Watcher").
 
     EDITOR'S NOTE:  Following is a list of the Waste Watcher Award winners by
 county.
 
                 DEP ANNOUNCES 2001 WASTE WATCHER AWARD WINNERS
 
     Allegheny County:  Goodwill Industries of Pittsburgh, for selling and
 recycling donated clothing, computers and electronics; Greater Pittsburgh
 Community Food Bank, for serving as a central collection facility for 500,000
 pounds per month of donated dented cans and other damaged products; and the
 Pennsylvania Resources Council, for its work with WasteCap of Allegheny County
 to promote voluntary recycling and waste-reduction practices.
 
     Armstrong County:  Girl Scout Troop No. 916, for reuse efforts that
 include collecting clothing for Goodwill Industries, and also collecting
 newspapers, linens and towels for animal shelters; and Den No. 5 Webelos
 Scouts, for collecting towels, linens and newspapers for animal shelters, and
 donating proceeds from recycling aluminum cans to the shelters.
 
     Berks County:  Vanity Fair Outlet Village, for providing recycling
 education to its tenants, an aggressive buy-recycled policy and recovering
 scrap metal and compost on site; and Boy Scout Troop No. 505, for a unique
 bicycle-recovery program.
 
     Blair County:  Blair County Department of Solid Waste, for its yard-waste
 and composting facility that is open year-round to residents; and Spring Cove
 Middle School, for an eighth-grade project that started a paper-recycling
 program to complement the school's beverage-container collection.
 
     Bucks County:  Pennsbury High School and Wheelabrator Falls Inc., for
 revamping a recycling program by adding aluminum and paper-recycling
 containers to the school's paper-recycling program; FDR Middle School and
 Wheelabrator Falls Inc., for community-recycling information pieces designed
 by students and other recycling efforts at the school; and Waste Management,
 Bucks County Courier Times, Doylestown Intelligencer Record, Oxford Valley
 Mall and Montgomery Mall, for their recycling education efforts.
 
     Cambria County:  Cambria County Solid Waste Authority, for an expanded
 recycling collection program and outreach efforts.
 
     Carbon County:  Carbon County Department of Solid Waste, for a
 comprehensive recycling education program in elementary schools; and Carbon
 County Environmental Education Center, for its waste-reduction program aimed
 at elementary students.
 
     Centre County:  State College, for its composting facility;
 Waste Management of State College, Centre Region Council of Governments,
 Centre Region Solid Waste Management Authority, for a Christmas-tree
 collection program; Penn State University Office of Physical Plant, Office of
 Housing & Food Services and Office of Residence Life, for successful promotion
 of recycling; The Autoport, for diverting recyclables from the waste stream
 and minimal contamination of recycled materials; Ponderosa Steak House, for
 cleaning and sorting recyclables; Philipsburg-Osceola Junior High School, for
 being an enthusiastic composting institution; Bellefonte Area High School, for
 efforts to implement recycling in classrooms and the cafeteria; Pennsylvania
 Fish and Boat Commission, for an excellent recycling program; Juniata Valley
 Council of the Boy Scouts of America, for using Seven Mountains Boy Scout Camp
 as a recycling drop-off location; State College and Centre County Solid Waste
 Management Authority, for making on-street recycling a reality; Centre Peace
 Inc., for using prison labor to restore old, broken furniture and appliances;
 Tait Farm Food Community Harvest, for recycling cracked and broken recycling
 bins, and using them as produce bins; Centre Region Council of Governments,
 for promoting recycling through public service announcements and successful
 collection programs; Penn State Computer Hardware Initiative Project, for
 repairing donated computer equipment and giving it to the needy, handicapped
 and local schools; Penn State Department of Agriculture and Extension
 Education, for recycling Christmas-card fronts, license plates, and paper and
 for other reuse ideas; and Centre County Solid Waste Management Authority, for
 its extensive recycling program.
 
     Chester County:  Recycling Services Inc., for a recycling program that
 collects 45 different materials; West Chester University, for a campus-wide
 collection program, including collections during sporting events; and
 Downingtown Area School District, for a recycling program that includes
 collecting paper from classrooms and beverage containers from food-service
 areas.
 
     Clinton County:  Clinton County Solid Waste Authority, for its countywide
 recycling program.
 
     Columbia County:  Town of Bloomsburg, for its continued leadership as
 Pennsylvania's oldest curbside recycling program.
 
     Cumberland County:  Lower Allen Township Composting Facility, for its
 collection and education program; Camp Hill, for its comprehensive yard-waste
 collection and recycling program; Hampden Township, for its comprehensive
 curbside collection and leaf and yard-waste program; Pennsylvania Association
 of Goodwills, for repairing and reselling donated consumer goods; and Solid
 Waste Authority of Cumberland County, for its comprehensive recycling
 education program.
 
     Delaware County:  Delaware County Solid Waste Authority, for collecting
 and donating 3,000 cellular phones.
 
     Erie County:  Millcreek Township, for building on its existing recycling
 program and starting a composting education program.
 
     Franklin County:  Boy Scout Troop No. 128, for starting and maintaining a
 voluntary newspaper and aluminum-can collection program; and Washington
 Township Recycling Center, for being the most significant recycling center in
 the county.
 
     Lackawanna County:  Dunmore School District, for paper, bottle and can
 recycling and composting efforts; Everything Natural, for selling products
 made from recycled materials and recycling education; Cooper's Seafood House,
 for its commitment to recycling and buying and using products made from
 recycled materials; Moscow, for its organized curbside collection program;
 University of Scranton, for its successful recycling program in place since
 1990; Lackawanna County Recycling Center, for its comprehensive recycling and
 outreach program; and Olyphant, for promoting recycling to new and current
 residents.
 
     Lancaster County:  Mount Joy, for its weekly curbside collection program;
 Mount Joy Township, for its comprehensive curbside collection program;
 Lancaster County Solid Waste Management Authority, for its long-running drop-
 off program; Manheim, for its curbside, leaf collection and outreach programs;
 City of Lancaster, for outreach with the city's recycling message to 3,000
 students; Jeff Stoltzfus and Adam Zook, for collecting agricultural plastic
 and using it for composite lumber; The Barn Saver, for dismantling barns and
 recovering most of the materials; and Ephrata, for aggressively educating
 residents about buying recycled.
 
     Lawrence County:  Lawrence County Environmental Services (LCES), for
 establishing a multi-municipality residential recycling education program.
 
     Lebanon County:  North Lebanon Township, for its recycling program that
 collects seven materials at curbside and offers a newspaper drop off each
 month; Jackson Township and TNT Sanitation Inc., for recycling more than 300
 tons of material at a savings of more than $18,000 in landfill tipping fees;
 and Greater Lebanon Refuse Authority, for its "Saving Center" that accepts all
 Act 101 recycled materials and its brochure, The Recycling Roundup.
 
     Lehigh County: City of Allentown, for its public education campaign and
 effective enforcement program, which have resulted in a participation rate of
 95 percent; and Lehigh County Office of Solid Waste Management, for its
 Household Hazardous Waste Program, which offers periodic curbside collection.
 
     Luzerne County:  Luzerne County, for publishing the sixth edition of the
 Luzerne County Recycling Guide; and Exeter, for offering drop-off recycling
 services to communities without recycling programs.
 
     Mercer County: Mercer County Builders Association, Mercer County Solid
 Waste Authority, Mercer County Regional Planning Commission, Fredonia, for
 holding a "Recycle Everything Possible" collection event.
 
     Mifflin County: Lewistown, for its curbside recycling program.
 
     Monroe County:   Monroe County Municipal Waste Management Authority, for
 its Household Hazardous Waste Program, which offers periodic curbside
 collection; and Tobyhanna Army Depot, for grass cycling, composting and other
 recycling efforts that reduced waste by 82 percent.
 
     Montgomery County:  Creative Artists' Resource Project and Philadelphia
 Dumpster Divers, for creating a materials exchange where artists bring in
 unwanted materials and receive credits toward shopping for other used
 materials; Upper Merion Township, for its quarterly recycling newsletter, The
 Township Lines; Emanuel Tire of Pennsylvania Inc., for recycling almost 95
 percent of its used and scrap tires; and Penn State Cooperative Extension and
 Montgomery County Office, for publishing and distributing its seasonal
 Earthworm newsletter.
 
     Northampton County: Pen Argyl, for distributing its quarterly Pen Argyl
 Update newsletter; Northampton County, for its Household Hazardous Waste
 Program, which offers periodic curbside collection; and the City of Bethlehem,
 for a comprehensive recycling program.
 
     Schuylkill County:  Schuylkill County, for its Household Hazardous Waste
 Program, which offers periodic curbside collection; and Hegins Township Board
 of Supervisors and Midway Supermarket, for diverting 200 tons of recyclables
 in 2000, using excellent signage and secure and well-maintained sites.
 
     Susquehanna County: Silver Lake Township, for being the first municipality
 in Susquehanna County to require recycling.
 
     Washington County:  East Washington and Washington & Jefferson College,
 for distributing an educational flier and magnet to more than 900 households
 and printing a recycling brochure aimed at approximately 150 Washington &
 Jefferson College students living off campus.
 
     Westmoreland County:  Plum and Waste Management of Pennsylvania, North
 Huntingdon Division, for partnering to sponsor a series of drop-off events for
 special materials five times during 2000.
 
     York County:  Penn Township Board of Commissioners, for promoting the
 township's Pay-As-You-Throw program through newsletters, door hangers,
 stickers and a page on the township website.
 
      CONTACT:  Jeff McCloud
                Deputy Press Secretary
                (717) 787-1323
 
 SOURCE  Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection