Parents Seek Alternatives to Family TV Watching

ParentCenter.com Tests Parents' TV IQ in Observance

Of National TV-Turnoff Week



Apr 23, 2001, 01:00 ET from ParentCenter.com

    SAN FRANCISCO, April 23 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- More than
 half of all parents think their families watch too much TV, and 63 percent say
 they let their kids watch television during family meals, according to a
 recent poll by ParentCenter.com.  National TV-Turnoff Week, April 23-29, is an
 annual opportunity for parents to limit or eliminate their child's TV viewing
 and explore alternative activities.
     ParentCenter.com (http://www.parentcenter.com/), the premiere online
 parenting resource, has developed an interactive family media quiz that lets
 parents test their TV IQ.  Quiz takers can find out how much TV is too much
 for kids, which programming exposes children to the most television violence,
 the best ways to help children develop healthy TV habits, and more.
     "Parents know that too much TV is bad for their kids.  What they need is
 practical, realistic advice on how to curtail the number of hours their kids
 spend sitting in front of the screen," says Linda Murray, executive editor of
 ParentCenter.com.  "That's why we created this resource of great ways to
 entertain your kids without grabbing the clicker.  You'll find dozens of
 parent-tested TV-free activities, including a list of kitchen-based ideas that
 can be used during meal preparation, a time when parents are most tempted to
 use TV as a baby-sitter."
     The site also offers parent reviews of dozens of children's TV shows as
 well as successful strategies from moms and dads for monitoring TV watching at
 home.  There are also resources for parents to help keep a child's video-game
 playing under control.
     "Computer games are often marketed to parents of very young children as
 developmental or learning tools," says Murray.  "But even these games can have
 a downside.  Parents should know that many experts say that children under 3
 are better off entertaining themselves with hands-on play and by interacting
 with others.  There's no need to give your toddler a head start on the
 computer -- he'll get plenty of exposure to them in a few years."
     For parents of children under 2, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)
 recommends that parents do not allow any TV viewing.  ParentCenter.com's
 sister site, BabyCenter.com (http://www.babycenter.com/), has age-appropriate
 information for expectant and new parents about stimulating development
 through toys, books, music, and play.
     The ParentCenter.com and BabyCenter.com Web sites are created by
 experienced parenting and health editors in consultation with an expert
 advisory board.  The Web sites offer parents hundreds of articles on
 children's health, development, and discipline, as well as an active community
 of parents who offer advice and support.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X10368557
 
 

SOURCE ParentCenter.com
    SAN FRANCISCO, April 23 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- More than
 half of all parents think their families watch too much TV, and 63 percent say
 they let their kids watch television during family meals, according to a
 recent poll by ParentCenter.com.  National TV-Turnoff Week, April 23-29, is an
 annual opportunity for parents to limit or eliminate their child's TV viewing
 and explore alternative activities.
     ParentCenter.com (http://www.parentcenter.com/), the premiere online
 parenting resource, has developed an interactive family media quiz that lets
 parents test their TV IQ.  Quiz takers can find out how much TV is too much
 for kids, which programming exposes children to the most television violence,
 the best ways to help children develop healthy TV habits, and more.
     "Parents know that too much TV is bad for their kids.  What they need is
 practical, realistic advice on how to curtail the number of hours their kids
 spend sitting in front of the screen," says Linda Murray, executive editor of
 ParentCenter.com.  "That's why we created this resource of great ways to
 entertain your kids without grabbing the clicker.  You'll find dozens of
 parent-tested TV-free activities, including a list of kitchen-based ideas that
 can be used during meal preparation, a time when parents are most tempted to
 use TV as a baby-sitter."
     The site also offers parent reviews of dozens of children's TV shows as
 well as successful strategies from moms and dads for monitoring TV watching at
 home.  There are also resources for parents to help keep a child's video-game
 playing under control.
     "Computer games are often marketed to parents of very young children as
 developmental or learning tools," says Murray.  "But even these games can have
 a downside.  Parents should know that many experts say that children under 3
 are better off entertaining themselves with hands-on play and by interacting
 with others.  There's no need to give your toddler a head start on the
 computer -- he'll get plenty of exposure to them in a few years."
     For parents of children under 2, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)
 recommends that parents do not allow any TV viewing.  ParentCenter.com's
 sister site, BabyCenter.com (http://www.babycenter.com/), has age-appropriate
 information for expectant and new parents about stimulating development
 through toys, books, music, and play.
     The ParentCenter.com and BabyCenter.com Web sites are created by
 experienced parenting and health editors in consultation with an expert
 advisory board.  The Web sites offer parents hundreds of articles on
 children's health, development, and discipline, as well as an active community
 of parents who offer advice and support.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X10368557
 
 SOURCE  ParentCenter.com