Parents Should Make Sure Older Kids' Immunizations Are Current, Too

Pain and fear of injections can be stopped cold with a topical skin

refrigerant like Gebauer's Ethyl Chloride.



Apr 03, 2001, 01:00 ET from The Gebauer Company

    CLEVELAND, April 3 /PRNewswire/ -- National Infant Immunization Week
 (April 16-22, 2001) should remind every parent not just of the importance of
 immunizing babies but older children, too.
     (Photo:  NewsCom:  http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20010403/NYFNSF07 )
     By the age of two, children should receive vaccines to protect them
 against 11 diseases:  diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, measles, mumps,
 rubella, hepatitis B, chicken pox, Hib meningitis and rotavirus. But
 immunization does not end with toddlers.  Another round of boosters is
 required as children enter kindergarten and again before seventh grade. The
 chicken pox (varicella) vaccine, which has been in the U.S. only since 1995,
 can be given at any age.  In fact, The American Academy of Pediatrics
 recommends anyone who has never had the vaccine or contracted chicken pox be
 immunized as soon as possible because the disease is much more severe in
 adolescents and adults.  Those over age 13 need two doses.
     The problem:  immunizations hurt and bigger kids are old enough to know.
 The fear of needles is stronger when it can be fully comprehended.  Parents
 can protect their older children not just from terrible diseases but from the
 pain and anxiety of injections by asking their doctors to spray Gebauer's
 Ethyl Chloride on the skin immediately before they administer a vaccine.
 Instantly the injection site is cooled and numb, and shots are pain-free. The
 anesthetic wears off in about two minutes.
     Gebauer's Ethyl Chloride is well known and has been trusted by
 pediatricians for generations. The Gebauer Company now offers various aerosol
 can applications such as Pain-Ease(TM) mist spray and Accu-Stream(TM) stream
 spray so doctors and nurses can choose the application that works best for
 them.
     In addition to controlling illness, another compelling reason to keep
 kids' booster shots up to date is to keep them in class.  State laws require
 that immunizations be current for every student or they cannot attend school.
 Last fall, the Cleveland Public School District had to immunize about
 4,000 students because either their boosters were never administered or
 records were lost in school transfers and medical center closings.
     Parents can ask their pediatrician for Gebauer's Ethyl Chloride, or call
 800-321-9348 for more information.
 
 

SOURCE The Gebauer Company
    CLEVELAND, April 3 /PRNewswire/ -- National Infant Immunization Week
 (April 16-22, 2001) should remind every parent not just of the importance of
 immunizing babies but older children, too.
     (Photo:  NewsCom:  http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20010403/NYFNSF07 )
     By the age of two, children should receive vaccines to protect them
 against 11 diseases:  diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, measles, mumps,
 rubella, hepatitis B, chicken pox, Hib meningitis and rotavirus. But
 immunization does not end with toddlers.  Another round of boosters is
 required as children enter kindergarten and again before seventh grade. The
 chicken pox (varicella) vaccine, which has been in the U.S. only since 1995,
 can be given at any age.  In fact, The American Academy of Pediatrics
 recommends anyone who has never had the vaccine or contracted chicken pox be
 immunized as soon as possible because the disease is much more severe in
 adolescents and adults.  Those over age 13 need two doses.
     The problem:  immunizations hurt and bigger kids are old enough to know.
 The fear of needles is stronger when it can be fully comprehended.  Parents
 can protect their older children not just from terrible diseases but from the
 pain and anxiety of injections by asking their doctors to spray Gebauer's
 Ethyl Chloride on the skin immediately before they administer a vaccine.
 Instantly the injection site is cooled and numb, and shots are pain-free. The
 anesthetic wears off in about two minutes.
     Gebauer's Ethyl Chloride is well known and has been trusted by
 pediatricians for generations. The Gebauer Company now offers various aerosol
 can applications such as Pain-Ease(TM) mist spray and Accu-Stream(TM) stream
 spray so doctors and nurses can choose the application that works best for
 them.
     In addition to controlling illness, another compelling reason to keep
 kids' booster shots up to date is to keep them in class.  State laws require
 that immunizations be current for every student or they cannot attend school.
 Last fall, the Cleveland Public School District had to immunize about
 4,000 students because either their boosters were never administered or
 records were lost in school transfers and medical center closings.
     Parents can ask their pediatrician for Gebauer's Ethyl Chloride, or call
 800-321-9348 for more information.
 
 SOURCE  The Gebauer Company