Pearl Software Launches Global Internet Management Software; Technology Helps Companies Control Bottom Line By Managing Employee Internet Use

Unauthorized Internet Use at Work

Estimated to Cost Companies Billions a Year



Apr 24, 2001, 01:00 ET from Pearl Software, Inc.

    PHILADELPHIA, April 24 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- As
 corporate America tightens its belt, companies are looking for new ways to
 trim costs -- and one area they are increasingly focusing on is unauthorized
 Internet use by employees.
     According to some estimates, companies are losing billions of dollars a
 year, drained by employees who play Internet games, chat with friends via
 e-mail, shop online, and surf the Net during business hours.  While companies
 pay close attention to online fraud and theft by employees, many fail to
 calculate the cost of lost productivity when employees use the Internet for
 personal use during work hours, said David Fertell, CEO of Pearl Software, a
 Philadelphia software developer.
     That concern prompted Fertell to design a customizable application that
 allows employers to manage employees' Internet use during business hours.  It
 was not a foreign area for Pearl Software, which in 1996 launched the highly
 regarded Cyber Snoop(TM) software for parents and educators seeking to manage
 children's online activities.
     The result was Pearl Echo(TM), a software program that manages all widely
 used forms of 'Net communication, including Web browsing, file transfers, news
 groups, chat, e-mail, ICQ Chat and AOL's Instant Messenger.
     "A salaried employee earning $40,000 a year can cost his or her employer
 at least $5,000 a year just by playing around on the Internet for an hour a
 day," said Fertell.  "What's regarded as `harmless' time on the Internet
 actually carries a very real cost to a company's bottom line."
     "Pearl Echo offers companies a tool to help encourage appropriate use of
 the Internet at their worksite."
     Once Pearl Echo is installed, it creates a content-recreatable log of
 employees' Internet activities.  An administrator reviewing the log can spot
 users' most frequented web sites, e-mail transactions, news group postings,
 file transfers and chat room conversations.  Pearl Echo tracks the top
 Internet users on a network and its Quick-Link(TM) feature links directly to
 the logged web page, allowing the administrator to view the page content.
     In addition to its monitoring capabilities, Pearl Echo can block
 objectionable content.  For example, a company could restrict employees'
 access to pornographic or racist web sites.  Pearl Echo can also be set to
 filter keywords and phrases to protect privacy and the dissemination of
 confidential, company information.
     The flexibility of Pearl Echo allows employers to configure it to log
 Internet activity without actually restoring the actual content of e-mail,
 news, chat or web-chat.
     Pearl Echo's Global Internet Management(TM) feature is unique in that it
 can manage employees who work remotely, such as telecommuters or traveling
 salespeople.  That same technology permits companies to manage all Internet
 activity from a central location or to outsource it to an Application Service
 Provider (ASP).
     Fertell said the key to success with a program like Pearl Echo is to marry
 it with an Acceptable Use Policy (AUP) -- a written policy that tells
 employees what Internet use is permissible on work time and what is not -- and
 how the company will treat non-compliance.
     "Just as a company adopts a policy on dress code and behavior toward work
 colleagues, so it should consider guidelines for acceptable Internet use.  For
 some companies, no Internet use for anything other than business activities
 may be appropriate.  Others may decide a certain amount of time each day or
 week is acceptable.  Some may say it's OK to surf between certain hours.
     "Whatever a company decides, the AUP should outline corporate expectations
 for employees' Internet use at work.  Pearl Echo is the tool that encourages
 compliance with a company's Internet use policy."
     Fertell said that having an AUP in place -- backed with software like
 Pearl Echo -- can reduce a company's legal exposure should it need to
 terminate an employee for inappropriate Internet use at work.
     "Without the protection of an AUP and a software program like Pearl Echo,
 it can be extremely difficult to discipline an employee who may have been
 engaging in illegal or unacceptable online behavior, such as gambling or
 pedophilic chat."
     Pearl Echo retails at $79 a copy with licensing and volume discounts based
 on the number of workstations on an installed network.  A free, five-user
 trial version of Pearl Echo is available at www.PearlEcho.com.  Copies of the
 software can be purchased through Pearl Software's Preferred Partners at
 800-PEARL-96.
     Pearl Software, Inc. was founded in 1996 by David Fertell and Joe Field.
 The company provides network-enabled products to the growing Internet user
 community.  Pearl Software's key patent-pending products include Pearl Echo
 and Cyber Snoop Desktop, which allows parents and educators to monitor
 children's online activity.  The company also offers browser control software,
 TakeMeHome(TM) and is commercializing an emergency chat response system,
 Chat911(TM).
 
     Pearl Echo, Global Internet Management, Quick-Link, Cyber Snoop,
 TakeMeHome and Chat911 are trademarks of Pearl Software, Inc.  All other brand
 and product names are trademarks of their respective owners.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X77271538
 
 

SOURCE Pearl Software, Inc.
    PHILADELPHIA, April 24 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- As
 corporate America tightens its belt, companies are looking for new ways to
 trim costs -- and one area they are increasingly focusing on is unauthorized
 Internet use by employees.
     According to some estimates, companies are losing billions of dollars a
 year, drained by employees who play Internet games, chat with friends via
 e-mail, shop online, and surf the Net during business hours.  While companies
 pay close attention to online fraud and theft by employees, many fail to
 calculate the cost of lost productivity when employees use the Internet for
 personal use during work hours, said David Fertell, CEO of Pearl Software, a
 Philadelphia software developer.
     That concern prompted Fertell to design a customizable application that
 allows employers to manage employees' Internet use during business hours.  It
 was not a foreign area for Pearl Software, which in 1996 launched the highly
 regarded Cyber Snoop(TM) software for parents and educators seeking to manage
 children's online activities.
     The result was Pearl Echo(TM), a software program that manages all widely
 used forms of 'Net communication, including Web browsing, file transfers, news
 groups, chat, e-mail, ICQ Chat and AOL's Instant Messenger.
     "A salaried employee earning $40,000 a year can cost his or her employer
 at least $5,000 a year just by playing around on the Internet for an hour a
 day," said Fertell.  "What's regarded as `harmless' time on the Internet
 actually carries a very real cost to a company's bottom line."
     "Pearl Echo offers companies a tool to help encourage appropriate use of
 the Internet at their worksite."
     Once Pearl Echo is installed, it creates a content-recreatable log of
 employees' Internet activities.  An administrator reviewing the log can spot
 users' most frequented web sites, e-mail transactions, news group postings,
 file transfers and chat room conversations.  Pearl Echo tracks the top
 Internet users on a network and its Quick-Link(TM) feature links directly to
 the logged web page, allowing the administrator to view the page content.
     In addition to its monitoring capabilities, Pearl Echo can block
 objectionable content.  For example, a company could restrict employees'
 access to pornographic or racist web sites.  Pearl Echo can also be set to
 filter keywords and phrases to protect privacy and the dissemination of
 confidential, company information.
     The flexibility of Pearl Echo allows employers to configure it to log
 Internet activity without actually restoring the actual content of e-mail,
 news, chat or web-chat.
     Pearl Echo's Global Internet Management(TM) feature is unique in that it
 can manage employees who work remotely, such as telecommuters or traveling
 salespeople.  That same technology permits companies to manage all Internet
 activity from a central location or to outsource it to an Application Service
 Provider (ASP).
     Fertell said the key to success with a program like Pearl Echo is to marry
 it with an Acceptable Use Policy (AUP) -- a written policy that tells
 employees what Internet use is permissible on work time and what is not -- and
 how the company will treat non-compliance.
     "Just as a company adopts a policy on dress code and behavior toward work
 colleagues, so it should consider guidelines for acceptable Internet use.  For
 some companies, no Internet use for anything other than business activities
 may be appropriate.  Others may decide a certain amount of time each day or
 week is acceptable.  Some may say it's OK to surf between certain hours.
     "Whatever a company decides, the AUP should outline corporate expectations
 for employees' Internet use at work.  Pearl Echo is the tool that encourages
 compliance with a company's Internet use policy."
     Fertell said that having an AUP in place -- backed with software like
 Pearl Echo -- can reduce a company's legal exposure should it need to
 terminate an employee for inappropriate Internet use at work.
     "Without the protection of an AUP and a software program like Pearl Echo,
 it can be extremely difficult to discipline an employee who may have been
 engaging in illegal or unacceptable online behavior, such as gambling or
 pedophilic chat."
     Pearl Echo retails at $79 a copy with licensing and volume discounts based
 on the number of workstations on an installed network.  A free, five-user
 trial version of Pearl Echo is available at www.PearlEcho.com.  Copies of the
 software can be purchased through Pearl Software's Preferred Partners at
 800-PEARL-96.
     Pearl Software, Inc. was founded in 1996 by David Fertell and Joe Field.
 The company provides network-enabled products to the growing Internet user
 community.  Pearl Software's key patent-pending products include Pearl Echo
 and Cyber Snoop Desktop, which allows parents and educators to monitor
 children's online activity.  The company also offers browser control software,
 TakeMeHome(TM) and is commercializing an emergency chat response system,
 Chat911(TM).
 
     Pearl Echo, Global Internet Management, Quick-Link, Cyber Snoop,
 TakeMeHome and Chat911 are trademarks of Pearl Software, Inc.  All other brand
 and product names are trademarks of their respective owners.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X77271538
 
 SOURCE  Pearl Software, Inc.