Pennsylvania Governor Ridge Asks President Bush To Make Pennsylvania Home of `The U.S. Army Museum'

Pennsylvania Already Has Committed More

Than $5 Million for World-Class Army Museum



Apr 11, 2001, 01:00 ET from Pennsylvania Office of the Governor

    HARRISBURG, Pa., April 11 /PRNewswire/ -- In a letter to President George
 W. Bush, Gov. Tom Ridge today asked the President to consider directing the
 Secretary of the Army to designate the planned museum to be built as part of
 the Army Heritage Center in Carlisle, Cumberland County, as "The U.S. Army
 Museum."
     "In 1999, the Secretary of the Army authorized the construction of an Army
 Museum at Carlisle Barracks," Gov. Ridge wrote.  "Although great progress has
 been made in advancing the Secretary's vision, I personally believe that he
 stopped short of recognizing the true potential of the Carlisle location.  You
 and your new team have the ability to harness this tremendous opportunity and
 make this long-overdue tribute a reality."
     In April 1998, Gov. Ridge traveled to Carlisle, Cumberland County, to
 announce that Pennsylvania was aggressively entering the race to be selected
 as the permanent home of the National Museum of the United States Army.
     With hopes of attracting more than a million visitors annually, Gov. Ridge
 proposed locating the museum on a portion of farmland adjacent to the Carlisle
 Barracks, where it would complement the U.S. Army War College -- the nation's
 second-oldest Army post -- and the Military History Institute.  It also would
 be just a short drive from Gettysburg, the country's most famous battlefield.
     Shortly after a meeting in January 1999 between Gov. Ridge and a top Army
 official, Secretary of the Army Louis Caldera announced the Army's intention
 to build a museum in Carlisle -- but stopped short of identifying it as the
 U.S. Army Museum.
     "This Carlisle museum deserves to be more than one of many museums in the
 Army's network of facilities," Gov. Ridge continued in his letter to the
 President.  "Instead, I ask that it be designated `The U.S. Army Museum.'
 With such a designation, the funds can be raised to make the Heritage Center a
 world-class museum, research center and education center, depicting a
 comprehensive picture of the heritage of the U.S. Army and the dedication and
 sacrifices of the American soldier.  The Carlisle project has the momentum,
 vision and organization to warrant such an important designation."
     Gov. Ridge noted that he is so certain that the Army Heritage Museum at
 Carlisle is the solution to the Army's long-standing lack of a capstone
 museum, that he has committed more than $5 million in Commonwealth funds to
 the development of this world-class facility.
     "There are myriad reasons to choose this site in Carlisle," Gov. Ridge
 wrote.  "Carlisle is located within 500 miles of 43 percent of the nation's
 population and is easily accessible via a major transportation network.
 Carlisle Barracks is the Army's second oldest post -- possessing a long and
 glorious history dating back to the Revolutionary War.
     "In addition to its significant history, Carlisle Barracks now houses the
 U.S. Army War College.  This institution, along with the Center for Strategic
 Leadership, provides the emerging leaders of tomorrow's Army with the skills
 and vision to secure our nation's future defense needs.  The synergy
 associated with locating `The U.S. Army Museum' at Carlisle will result in a
 preeminent strategic research center as well as a place to convey our
 soldiers' story to the America people.
     "I thank you for your support of this valuable national project in
 Pennsylvania," Gov. Ridge concluded.  "I know you will be pleased by the
 resulting national treasure -- The U.S. Army Museum."
 
     CONTACT:  Steve Aaron, Deputy Director of Communications of the
 Pennsylvania Office of the Governor, 717-783-1116.
 
 

SOURCE Pennsylvania Office of the Governor
    HARRISBURG, Pa., April 11 /PRNewswire/ -- In a letter to President George
 W. Bush, Gov. Tom Ridge today asked the President to consider directing the
 Secretary of the Army to designate the planned museum to be built as part of
 the Army Heritage Center in Carlisle, Cumberland County, as "The U.S. Army
 Museum."
     "In 1999, the Secretary of the Army authorized the construction of an Army
 Museum at Carlisle Barracks," Gov. Ridge wrote.  "Although great progress has
 been made in advancing the Secretary's vision, I personally believe that he
 stopped short of recognizing the true potential of the Carlisle location.  You
 and your new team have the ability to harness this tremendous opportunity and
 make this long-overdue tribute a reality."
     In April 1998, Gov. Ridge traveled to Carlisle, Cumberland County, to
 announce that Pennsylvania was aggressively entering the race to be selected
 as the permanent home of the National Museum of the United States Army.
     With hopes of attracting more than a million visitors annually, Gov. Ridge
 proposed locating the museum on a portion of farmland adjacent to the Carlisle
 Barracks, where it would complement the U.S. Army War College -- the nation's
 second-oldest Army post -- and the Military History Institute.  It also would
 be just a short drive from Gettysburg, the country's most famous battlefield.
     Shortly after a meeting in January 1999 between Gov. Ridge and a top Army
 official, Secretary of the Army Louis Caldera announced the Army's intention
 to build a museum in Carlisle -- but stopped short of identifying it as the
 U.S. Army Museum.
     "This Carlisle museum deserves to be more than one of many museums in the
 Army's network of facilities," Gov. Ridge continued in his letter to the
 President.  "Instead, I ask that it be designated `The U.S. Army Museum.'
 With such a designation, the funds can be raised to make the Heritage Center a
 world-class museum, research center and education center, depicting a
 comprehensive picture of the heritage of the U.S. Army and the dedication and
 sacrifices of the American soldier.  The Carlisle project has the momentum,
 vision and organization to warrant such an important designation."
     Gov. Ridge noted that he is so certain that the Army Heritage Museum at
 Carlisle is the solution to the Army's long-standing lack of a capstone
 museum, that he has committed more than $5 million in Commonwealth funds to
 the development of this world-class facility.
     "There are myriad reasons to choose this site in Carlisle," Gov. Ridge
 wrote.  "Carlisle is located within 500 miles of 43 percent of the nation's
 population and is easily accessible via a major transportation network.
 Carlisle Barracks is the Army's second oldest post -- possessing a long and
 glorious history dating back to the Revolutionary War.
     "In addition to its significant history, Carlisle Barracks now houses the
 U.S. Army War College.  This institution, along with the Center for Strategic
 Leadership, provides the emerging leaders of tomorrow's Army with the skills
 and vision to secure our nation's future defense needs.  The synergy
 associated with locating `The U.S. Army Museum' at Carlisle will result in a
 preeminent strategic research center as well as a place to convey our
 soldiers' story to the America people.
     "I thank you for your support of this valuable national project in
 Pennsylvania," Gov. Ridge concluded.  "I know you will be pleased by the
 resulting national treasure -- The U.S. Army Museum."
 
     CONTACT:  Steve Aaron, Deputy Director of Communications of the
 Pennsylvania Office of the Governor, 717-783-1116.
 
 SOURCE  Pennsylvania Office of the Governor