PNC Hails World-Class Achievers for Contributions to Humanity

Freeman, Venter, Nachtwey, Roth, the Magees Win 2001 Common Wealth Awards



Apr 29, 2001, 01:00 ET from PNC Financial Services Group, Inc.

    WILMINGTON, Del., April 29 /PRNewswire/ -- The PNC Financial Services
 Group announces the winners of the 2001 Common Wealth Awards of Distinguished
 Service.  The awards are presented annually to individuals who have enriched
 and advanced humanity through their exceptional lifetime achievements.
     PNC Bank, Delaware, trustee for the awards for 22 years, presented a
 shared prize of $250,000 to the honorees at a black-tie ceremony held tonight
 at the Hotel du Pont.
     (Photo:  http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20010429/HSSU003 )
 
     Winners of this year's Common Wealth Awards are:
     * Morgan Freeman, veteran actor acclaimed for his classic, commanding
       roles on stage screen and television, for Dramatic Arts;
     * J. Craig Venter, biochemist, entrepreneur and gene pioneer who succeeded
       in unlocking the human genetic code, for Science and Invention;
     * James Nachtwey, renowned photojournalist who has chronicled the human
       anguish of war, genocide and famine worldwide, for Mass Communications;
     * Philip Roth, Pulitzer Prize winner regarded as a literary giant among
       America's postwar generation of writers, for Literature;
     * Dr. William Magee and Kathleen Magee, founders of Operation Smile, which
       aids children with facial deformities around the world, for Public
       Service.
 
     "The 2001 Common Wealth Award winners are people who believe they can make
 a difference and do," said Calvert A. Morgan, Jr., chairman, president and CEO
 of PNC Bank, Delaware.  "Their enduring contributions have touched all of us
 today and stand as a legacy to future generations.  PNC is privileged to honor
 these remarkable achievers for their grand talents and triumphs."
     The Common Wealth Awards were first presented in 1979 to reward and
 encourage the best of human performance.  Since that time, 132 honorees of
 international renown have received more than $2 million in cash prizes
 conferred by the awards.
     Funding for the awards comes from a trust set up by the late Ralph Hayes,
 an influential business executive and philanthropist.  From 1943 to 1965,
 Hayes served on the board of directors of predecessors to the present-day
 PNC Bank.  Through his endowment, he sought to recognize outstanding
 achievement in seven areas of human endeavor:  mass communications, public
 service, dramatic arts, science and invention, literature, government and
 sociology.
     The Common Wealth honorees rank among the most gifted and famous people in
 modern history.  Ten past honorees have been winners of the Nobel Prize, such
 as international human rights leader Archbishop Desmond Tutu.  Other
 luminaries on the Common Wealth roster include dance legend Mikhail
 Baryshnikov; former First Lady, Betty Ford; and father of the polio vaccine,
 the late Jonas Salk.
     Through their signature contributions, the 2001 honorees exemplify the
 richness of talent and standards of excellence symbolized by the Common Wealth
 Awards.
     Morgan Freeman, 64, winner of the 2001 Common Wealth Award for Dramatic
 Arts, has spent more than 30 years forging a distinguished and varied acting
 career.  Regarded as one of America's classic male actors, Freeman is
 acclaimed for his eloquence, stature and consistency.  His often heroic
 characters convey an honesty and likeability that have endeared the actor to
 audiences.  His theater work has ranged from musicals to drama to Shakespeare,
 earning him three Obie Awards and a Drama Desk Award.  He has received three
 Oscar nominations for his movie performances in Street Smart, Driving Miss
 Daisy and The Shawshank Redemption.  He has delivered standout performances in
 Glory, Amistad and the 2000 release of Nurse Betty.  Freeman is founder of
 Revelations Entertainment, a production company where he has pursued his
 interests in producing and directing.
     J. Craig Venter, 54, is awarded the 2001 Common Wealth Award for Science
 and Invention, for his radical but successful techniques to unlock the human
 genetic code.  A biochemist and trailblazer, Venter is president of Celera
 Genomics, where he pioneered high-speed methods of decoding and sequencing the
 human genome.  In 1998, Venter stirred controversy by announcing that his
 company would finish mapping human DNA three years sooner than the federally
 financed Human Genome Project (HGP), which had been underway since 1990.  What
 followed was the race to sequence the human genome, with Venter being credited
 as the principal decoder.  In June 2000, Venter and HGP announced jointly that
 they had decoded nearly the entire set of human genes, a discovery that is
 expected to alter the course of science and medicine throughout the 21st
 century.  Venter's bold initiative helped usher in this new era years sooner
 than predicted.
     James Nachtwey, 53, stands as a legend among modern-day photojournalists.
 He receives the 2001 Common Wealth Award for Mass Communications.  For more
 than 20 years, Nachtwey has traversed the world's most chaotic and dangerous
 spots -- from Central America to Northern Ireland to the Balkan nations to
 Africa -- where he has captured gruesome images of human suffering and
 carnage.  Nachtwey is renowned for his ability to reveal human beauty and
 tenderness in the midst of harshness and pain.  His photos have appeared in
 magazines, newspapers and books where he hopes they will provoke public anger
 and action to change the world.  His latest book, Inferno, documents the
 brutality of the 1990s in developing countries.  Nachtwey is one of the
 world's most honored photojournalists, receiving tributes that include
 Magazine Photographer of the Year six times and the Robert Capa Gold Medal
 from the Overseas Press Club five times.
     Philip Roth, 67, renowned as an author of conscience and comedy, wins the
 2001 Common Wealth Award for Literature.  He has produced a substantial body
 of fiction that is at once distinguished and outrageous.  Roth is acclaimed
 for his inventiveness, his comic genius and his special gift for playing
 "make-believe with reality."  His best-known works include the infamous and
 hugely successful Portnoy's Complaint, the Zuckerman Unbound trilogy,
 Patrimony, and the Pulitzer Prize-winning American Pastoral.  Critics have
 called his books "America's most raucously funny novels."  The author's
 Jewish-American upbringing in Newark, New Jersey, has been a well-spring for
 his wit and humor.  Roth has been writing for more than 40 years, earning a
 host of major literary awards.  Time magazine described him as "a writer who
 has mastered his craft and come to know and enjoy who he is and what he came
 from."  His latest novel, The Human Stain, was published in 2000.
     Dr. William Magee, 57, and Kathleen Magee, 55, have spent the past
 18 years changing the face of the future by helping children suffering with
 facial deformities.  For their humanitarian efforts, the Magees are awarded
 the 2001 Common Wealth Award for Public Service.  The Magees are the
 husband-and-wife founders of Operation Smile, an organization that provides
 free reconstructive surgery and related health care to poor children in
 developing countries and the U.S.  The Magees devote half their lives to
 Operation Smile, which depends on volunteer labor, donated equipment and
 supplies to carry out its missions.  The Magees and their volunteer teams work
 tirelessly to correct cleft palates, cleft lips and other birth defects,
 helping deformed children come out of hiding and lead lives of dignity and
 hope.  William Magee believes that Operation Smile's collaboration for the
 poor shows that "humanity and acts of kindness are free of political, cultural
 and ethnic barriers."
 
     PNC Advisors is administrator of the Common Wealth Trust.  Headquartered
 in Pittsburgh, PNC Advisors is one of the nation's largest wealth managers,
 with over $65 billion in assets under management, and is a member of The PNC
 Financial Services Group.  It provides a full range of tailored investment and
 traditional banking solutions to affluent individuals and families, including
 full-service brokerage through J.J.B. Hilliard, W.L. Lyons, Inc., a registered
 broker-dealer and member of NASD and SIPC.  PNC Advisors also serves as
 investment manager and trustee for employee benefit plans, and charitable and
 endowment assets.  PNC Advisors currently operates in 21 states and serves
 over 320,000 clients.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X17125386
 
 

SOURCE PNC Financial Services Group, Inc.
    WILMINGTON, Del., April 29 /PRNewswire/ -- The PNC Financial Services
 Group announces the winners of the 2001 Common Wealth Awards of Distinguished
 Service.  The awards are presented annually to individuals who have enriched
 and advanced humanity through their exceptional lifetime achievements.
     PNC Bank, Delaware, trustee for the awards for 22 years, presented a
 shared prize of $250,000 to the honorees at a black-tie ceremony held tonight
 at the Hotel du Pont.
     (Photo:  http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20010429/HSSU003 )
 
     Winners of this year's Common Wealth Awards are:
     * Morgan Freeman, veteran actor acclaimed for his classic, commanding
       roles on stage screen and television, for Dramatic Arts;
     * J. Craig Venter, biochemist, entrepreneur and gene pioneer who succeeded
       in unlocking the human genetic code, for Science and Invention;
     * James Nachtwey, renowned photojournalist who has chronicled the human
       anguish of war, genocide and famine worldwide, for Mass Communications;
     * Philip Roth, Pulitzer Prize winner regarded as a literary giant among
       America's postwar generation of writers, for Literature;
     * Dr. William Magee and Kathleen Magee, founders of Operation Smile, which
       aids children with facial deformities around the world, for Public
       Service.
 
     "The 2001 Common Wealth Award winners are people who believe they can make
 a difference and do," said Calvert A. Morgan, Jr., chairman, president and CEO
 of PNC Bank, Delaware.  "Their enduring contributions have touched all of us
 today and stand as a legacy to future generations.  PNC is privileged to honor
 these remarkable achievers for their grand talents and triumphs."
     The Common Wealth Awards were first presented in 1979 to reward and
 encourage the best of human performance.  Since that time, 132 honorees of
 international renown have received more than $2 million in cash prizes
 conferred by the awards.
     Funding for the awards comes from a trust set up by the late Ralph Hayes,
 an influential business executive and philanthropist.  From 1943 to 1965,
 Hayes served on the board of directors of predecessors to the present-day
 PNC Bank.  Through his endowment, he sought to recognize outstanding
 achievement in seven areas of human endeavor:  mass communications, public
 service, dramatic arts, science and invention, literature, government and
 sociology.
     The Common Wealth honorees rank among the most gifted and famous people in
 modern history.  Ten past honorees have been winners of the Nobel Prize, such
 as international human rights leader Archbishop Desmond Tutu.  Other
 luminaries on the Common Wealth roster include dance legend Mikhail
 Baryshnikov; former First Lady, Betty Ford; and father of the polio vaccine,
 the late Jonas Salk.
     Through their signature contributions, the 2001 honorees exemplify the
 richness of talent and standards of excellence symbolized by the Common Wealth
 Awards.
     Morgan Freeman, 64, winner of the 2001 Common Wealth Award for Dramatic
 Arts, has spent more than 30 years forging a distinguished and varied acting
 career.  Regarded as one of America's classic male actors, Freeman is
 acclaimed for his eloquence, stature and consistency.  His often heroic
 characters convey an honesty and likeability that have endeared the actor to
 audiences.  His theater work has ranged from musicals to drama to Shakespeare,
 earning him three Obie Awards and a Drama Desk Award.  He has received three
 Oscar nominations for his movie performances in Street Smart, Driving Miss
 Daisy and The Shawshank Redemption.  He has delivered standout performances in
 Glory, Amistad and the 2000 release of Nurse Betty.  Freeman is founder of
 Revelations Entertainment, a production company where he has pursued his
 interests in producing and directing.
     J. Craig Venter, 54, is awarded the 2001 Common Wealth Award for Science
 and Invention, for his radical but successful techniques to unlock the human
 genetic code.  A biochemist and trailblazer, Venter is president of Celera
 Genomics, where he pioneered high-speed methods of decoding and sequencing the
 human genome.  In 1998, Venter stirred controversy by announcing that his
 company would finish mapping human DNA three years sooner than the federally
 financed Human Genome Project (HGP), which had been underway since 1990.  What
 followed was the race to sequence the human genome, with Venter being credited
 as the principal decoder.  In June 2000, Venter and HGP announced jointly that
 they had decoded nearly the entire set of human genes, a discovery that is
 expected to alter the course of science and medicine throughout the 21st
 century.  Venter's bold initiative helped usher in this new era years sooner
 than predicted.
     James Nachtwey, 53, stands as a legend among modern-day photojournalists.
 He receives the 2001 Common Wealth Award for Mass Communications.  For more
 than 20 years, Nachtwey has traversed the world's most chaotic and dangerous
 spots -- from Central America to Northern Ireland to the Balkan nations to
 Africa -- where he has captured gruesome images of human suffering and
 carnage.  Nachtwey is renowned for his ability to reveal human beauty and
 tenderness in the midst of harshness and pain.  His photos have appeared in
 magazines, newspapers and books where he hopes they will provoke public anger
 and action to change the world.  His latest book, Inferno, documents the
 brutality of the 1990s in developing countries.  Nachtwey is one of the
 world's most honored photojournalists, receiving tributes that include
 Magazine Photographer of the Year six times and the Robert Capa Gold Medal
 from the Overseas Press Club five times.
     Philip Roth, 67, renowned as an author of conscience and comedy, wins the
 2001 Common Wealth Award for Literature.  He has produced a substantial body
 of fiction that is at once distinguished and outrageous.  Roth is acclaimed
 for his inventiveness, his comic genius and his special gift for playing
 "make-believe with reality."  His best-known works include the infamous and
 hugely successful Portnoy's Complaint, the Zuckerman Unbound trilogy,
 Patrimony, and the Pulitzer Prize-winning American Pastoral.  Critics have
 called his books "America's most raucously funny novels."  The author's
 Jewish-American upbringing in Newark, New Jersey, has been a well-spring for
 his wit and humor.  Roth has been writing for more than 40 years, earning a
 host of major literary awards.  Time magazine described him as "a writer who
 has mastered his craft and come to know and enjoy who he is and what he came
 from."  His latest novel, The Human Stain, was published in 2000.
     Dr. William Magee, 57, and Kathleen Magee, 55, have spent the past
 18 years changing the face of the future by helping children suffering with
 facial deformities.  For their humanitarian efforts, the Magees are awarded
 the 2001 Common Wealth Award for Public Service.  The Magees are the
 husband-and-wife founders of Operation Smile, an organization that provides
 free reconstructive surgery and related health care to poor children in
 developing countries and the U.S.  The Magees devote half their lives to
 Operation Smile, which depends on volunteer labor, donated equipment and
 supplies to carry out its missions.  The Magees and their volunteer teams work
 tirelessly to correct cleft palates, cleft lips and other birth defects,
 helping deformed children come out of hiding and lead lives of dignity and
 hope.  William Magee believes that Operation Smile's collaboration for the
 poor shows that "humanity and acts of kindness are free of political, cultural
 and ethnic barriers."
 
     PNC Advisors is administrator of the Common Wealth Trust.  Headquartered
 in Pittsburgh, PNC Advisors is one of the nation's largest wealth managers,
 with over $65 billion in assets under management, and is a member of The PNC
 Financial Services Group.  It provides a full range of tailored investment and
 traditional banking solutions to affluent individuals and families, including
 full-service brokerage through J.J.B. Hilliard, W.L. Lyons, Inc., a registered
 broker-dealer and member of NASD and SIPC.  PNC Advisors also serves as
 investment manager and trustee for employee benefit plans, and charitable and
 endowment assets.  PNC Advisors currently operates in 21 states and serves
 over 320,000 clients.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X17125386
 
 SOURCE  PNC Financial Services Group, Inc.

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