Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Resource Center - www.Ptsdalliance.org - Now Available On-Line

Apr 10, 2001, 01:00 ET from The Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Alliance

    NEW YORK, April 10 /PRNewswire/ -- The Posttraumatic Stress Disorder
 (PTSD) Alliance, a group of the nation's leading professional and advocacy
 organizations representing trauma-related stress, anxiety disorders and
 women's health, has marked its one year anniversary with the launch of a new
 web site, http://www.PTSDAlliance.org.  The on-line resource center has been
 developed as an educational support tool for individuals diagnosed with PTSD
 and their loved ones; those at risk for developing PTSD; and medical,
 healthcare and other frontline professionals who work with trauma survivors
 and PTSD patients.
     The PTSD Alliance is the first national coalition dedicated to increasing
 awareness and promoting a better understanding of PTSD.  The PTSD Alliance was
 developed to meet an unmet need in educating the general public and frontline
 professionals about PTSD -- a prevalent and treatable but commonly undiagnosed
 or misdiagnosed health condition.
     The easy-to-navigate web site provides general background on PTSD,
 trauma-related causes, signs and symptoms, myths, diagnosis, treatment and
 support.  Visitors can order PTSD Alliance information packets -- available
 free of charge -- including an eight-page booklet and patient education video.
 The site provides links to the four member organizations, each of which offers
 additional education and training resources, and information about local
 support groups and referral services.
     The site also offers a PTSD primer on screening, recognition and
 diagnosis, treatment and self care for frontline professionals, which include
 medical, healthcare and mental health practitioners; rape, domestic violence
 and substance abuse counselors; social workers and clergy; law enforcement and
 emergency service personnel.
     An estimated 70 percent of American adults have experienced a traumatic
 event at least once in their lives, and up to 20 percent of these people go on
 to develop PTSD.  Women are about twice as likely as men to develop PTSD.
     Despite its prevalence -- affecting one out of 13 Americans -- PTSD is not
 widely understood.  Although most often associated with war veterans, PTSD can
 affect anyone who has experienced extreme trauma; been victimized or has
 witnessed a violent act; or has been repeatedly exposed to life-threatening
 situations.  This includes survivors of rape or sexual assault, domestic
 abuse, childhood trauma, physical attacks, car accidents, school or workplace
 violence, natural disasters, or other unexpected, catastrophic, or
 psychologically distressing events.
     Once properly diagnosed, PTSD is treatable with psychotherapy, medication
 or a combination of both.  However, fewer than 30 percent of patients
 diagnosed with PTSD receive treatment.  Research shows PTSD sufferers often do
 not seek professional help because they don't associate their symptoms with
 past trauma, they avoid dealing with anything related to the traumatic event,
 or they feel helpless as to where to go for help.
     "The PTSD Alliance web site provides a wealth of resources for anyone
 seeking comprehensive, easy-to-understand information about this complex
 disorder.  For some people, the internet is the best way to access information
 for themselves, a loved one, a colleague, or a patient.  Our goal is to offer
 easy access to PTSD information and professional support resources that are
 available," said PTSD Alliance advisor, Deborah Horan, Manager of Special
 Issues, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG).
 "Importantly, PTSD sufferers will see that they aren't alone and that there is
 hope for recovery.  There is a lot information and many dedicated people
 affiliated with the PTSD Alliance who can help."
     Launched on March 7, 2000, the PTSD Alliance founding member organizations
 are The Sidran Traumatic Stress Foundation, The Anxiety Disorders Association
 of America (ADAA), The International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies
 (ISTSS) and American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG).
     Through its resource center (toll-free 1-877-507-PTSD) and website
 (http://www.PTSDAlliance.org), the PTSD Alliance offers free booklets and
 other resources produced by the four member organizations including brochures,
 screening tools, continuing education programs, and other published
 literature.  The PTSD Alliance is supported by an unrestricted educational
 grant from Pfizer Inc.
 
 

SOURCE The Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Alliance
    NEW YORK, April 10 /PRNewswire/ -- The Posttraumatic Stress Disorder
 (PTSD) Alliance, a group of the nation's leading professional and advocacy
 organizations representing trauma-related stress, anxiety disorders and
 women's health, has marked its one year anniversary with the launch of a new
 web site, http://www.PTSDAlliance.org.  The on-line resource center has been
 developed as an educational support tool for individuals diagnosed with PTSD
 and their loved ones; those at risk for developing PTSD; and medical,
 healthcare and other frontline professionals who work with trauma survivors
 and PTSD patients.
     The PTSD Alliance is the first national coalition dedicated to increasing
 awareness and promoting a better understanding of PTSD.  The PTSD Alliance was
 developed to meet an unmet need in educating the general public and frontline
 professionals about PTSD -- a prevalent and treatable but commonly undiagnosed
 or misdiagnosed health condition.
     The easy-to-navigate web site provides general background on PTSD,
 trauma-related causes, signs and symptoms, myths, diagnosis, treatment and
 support.  Visitors can order PTSD Alliance information packets -- available
 free of charge -- including an eight-page booklet and patient education video.
 The site provides links to the four member organizations, each of which offers
 additional education and training resources, and information about local
 support groups and referral services.
     The site also offers a PTSD primer on screening, recognition and
 diagnosis, treatment and self care for frontline professionals, which include
 medical, healthcare and mental health practitioners; rape, domestic violence
 and substance abuse counselors; social workers and clergy; law enforcement and
 emergency service personnel.
     An estimated 70 percent of American adults have experienced a traumatic
 event at least once in their lives, and up to 20 percent of these people go on
 to develop PTSD.  Women are about twice as likely as men to develop PTSD.
     Despite its prevalence -- affecting one out of 13 Americans -- PTSD is not
 widely understood.  Although most often associated with war veterans, PTSD can
 affect anyone who has experienced extreme trauma; been victimized or has
 witnessed a violent act; or has been repeatedly exposed to life-threatening
 situations.  This includes survivors of rape or sexual assault, domestic
 abuse, childhood trauma, physical attacks, car accidents, school or workplace
 violence, natural disasters, or other unexpected, catastrophic, or
 psychologically distressing events.
     Once properly diagnosed, PTSD is treatable with psychotherapy, medication
 or a combination of both.  However, fewer than 30 percent of patients
 diagnosed with PTSD receive treatment.  Research shows PTSD sufferers often do
 not seek professional help because they don't associate their symptoms with
 past trauma, they avoid dealing with anything related to the traumatic event,
 or they feel helpless as to where to go for help.
     "The PTSD Alliance web site provides a wealth of resources for anyone
 seeking comprehensive, easy-to-understand information about this complex
 disorder.  For some people, the internet is the best way to access information
 for themselves, a loved one, a colleague, or a patient.  Our goal is to offer
 easy access to PTSD information and professional support resources that are
 available," said PTSD Alliance advisor, Deborah Horan, Manager of Special
 Issues, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG).
 "Importantly, PTSD sufferers will see that they aren't alone and that there is
 hope for recovery.  There is a lot information and many dedicated people
 affiliated with the PTSD Alliance who can help."
     Launched on March 7, 2000, the PTSD Alliance founding member organizations
 are The Sidran Traumatic Stress Foundation, The Anxiety Disorders Association
 of America (ADAA), The International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies
 (ISTSS) and American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG).
     Through its resource center (toll-free 1-877-507-PTSD) and website
 (http://www.PTSDAlliance.org), the PTSD Alliance offers free booklets and
 other resources produced by the four member organizations including brochures,
 screening tools, continuing education programs, and other published
 literature.  The PTSD Alliance is supported by an unrestricted educational
 grant from Pfizer Inc.
 
 SOURCE  The Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Alliance