Psychologist's Personal Struggle With Common Anxiety Disorder Inspires New Self-Help Book

Millions of Social Anxiety Disorder Sufferers Can

Learn How to Reclaim Their Lives



Apr 17, 2001, 01:00 ET from Barbara G. Markway, Ph.D. and Gregory P. Markway, Ph.D.

    JEFFERSON CITY, Mo., April 17 /PRNewswire/ -- In a new book, "Painfully
 Shy: How To Overcome Social Anxiety and Reclaim Your Life," Barbara Markway,
 Ph.D., a clinical psychologist and expert in social anxiety disorder, as well
 as a sufferer, recounts her life-long struggles with the most common anxiety
 disorder in the United States.  Co-authored with her husband, Gregory Markway,
 Ph.D., also a clinical psychologist, the book highlights the latest
 breakthroughs in the understanding of the condition and its treatment, such as
 therapy and medication, in a practical, easy to understand format.  For the
 more than 10 million Americans with social anxiety disorder, the book is
 designed to provide hope and encouragement for sufferers.
     "For years I helped other people with their problems, yet I couldn't admit
 that I struggled with the same situations," said Dr. Barbara Markway.  "I
 felt, however, that somehow I was doing a disservice to my patients by not
 sharing my own experiences.  By telling my story in "Painfully Shy," both the
 triumphs and the challenges, I was able to learn more about myself as well as
 offer guidance and motivation to those who are suffering from similar
 experiences."
 
     Social Anxiety Disorder: A Common, But Underrecognized Condition
     Social anxiety disorder, also known as social phobia, is the third most
 common psychiatric disorder in the United States, behind depression and
 alcoholism.  It is characterized by an intense, persistent fear and avoidance
 of social or performance situations, to the point where everyday activities
 are affected.  The condition typically emerges in adolescence, and without
 proper treatment can significantly impair work or social situations throughout
 life.
     Despite the severity of social anxiety disorder, only five percent of
 sufferers seek help.  In fact, a study published in the American Journal of
 Psychiatry revealed that the average social anxiety disorder sufferer waits
 more than a decade before confiding in a mental health professional.  The most
 commonly cited reasons for not seeking treatment were an uncertainty over
 where to go for help, financial barriers and fear of what others might think
 or say.
     "We hope Painfully Shy will help readers better understand symptoms they
 may be experiencing and come to a realization that they are not suffering
 alone," said Dr. Gregory Markway.  "The book is also a good resource for
 people struggling to understand how their loved ones feel living with the
 condition."
 
     Hope for Social Anxiety Disorder Sufferers
     "Painfully Shy" educates readers about different treatment options ranging
 from cognitive behaviorial therapy to medication or a combination of the two.
 Paxil(R) (paroxetine HCl), manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline, is one of a newer
 class of antidepressant medications known as selective serotonin reuptake
 inhibitors (SSRIs), and is the first and only medication approved by the FDA
 to treat social anxiety disorder.  Anxiety disorders are  caused by a
 combination of factors, one of which is an imbalance of serotonin levels in
 the brain.  SSRIs are thought to work by restoring the chemical balance.
     According to Dr. Barbara Markway, "The important thing to remember is that
 although social anxiety disorder is still highly under-recognized, effective
 treatments are available and there is hope for those who suffer from the
 condition."
 
     Meet The Authors
     Drs. Barbara and Gregory Markway will be signing copies of Painfully Shy
 at the American Psychiatric Association annual meeting on May 8, 2001 in New
 Orleans, LA.
 
 

SOURCE Barbara G. Markway, Ph.D. and Gregory P. Markway, Ph.D.
    JEFFERSON CITY, Mo., April 17 /PRNewswire/ -- In a new book, "Painfully
 Shy: How To Overcome Social Anxiety and Reclaim Your Life," Barbara Markway,
 Ph.D., a clinical psychologist and expert in social anxiety disorder, as well
 as a sufferer, recounts her life-long struggles with the most common anxiety
 disorder in the United States.  Co-authored with her husband, Gregory Markway,
 Ph.D., also a clinical psychologist, the book highlights the latest
 breakthroughs in the understanding of the condition and its treatment, such as
 therapy and medication, in a practical, easy to understand format.  For the
 more than 10 million Americans with social anxiety disorder, the book is
 designed to provide hope and encouragement for sufferers.
     "For years I helped other people with their problems, yet I couldn't admit
 that I struggled with the same situations," said Dr. Barbara Markway.  "I
 felt, however, that somehow I was doing a disservice to my patients by not
 sharing my own experiences.  By telling my story in "Painfully Shy," both the
 triumphs and the challenges, I was able to learn more about myself as well as
 offer guidance and motivation to those who are suffering from similar
 experiences."
 
     Social Anxiety Disorder: A Common, But Underrecognized Condition
     Social anxiety disorder, also known as social phobia, is the third most
 common psychiatric disorder in the United States, behind depression and
 alcoholism.  It is characterized by an intense, persistent fear and avoidance
 of social or performance situations, to the point where everyday activities
 are affected.  The condition typically emerges in adolescence, and without
 proper treatment can significantly impair work or social situations throughout
 life.
     Despite the severity of social anxiety disorder, only five percent of
 sufferers seek help.  In fact, a study published in the American Journal of
 Psychiatry revealed that the average social anxiety disorder sufferer waits
 more than a decade before confiding in a mental health professional.  The most
 commonly cited reasons for not seeking treatment were an uncertainty over
 where to go for help, financial barriers and fear of what others might think
 or say.
     "We hope Painfully Shy will help readers better understand symptoms they
 may be experiencing and come to a realization that they are not suffering
 alone," said Dr. Gregory Markway.  "The book is also a good resource for
 people struggling to understand how their loved ones feel living with the
 condition."
 
     Hope for Social Anxiety Disorder Sufferers
     "Painfully Shy" educates readers about different treatment options ranging
 from cognitive behaviorial therapy to medication or a combination of the two.
 Paxil(R) (paroxetine HCl), manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline, is one of a newer
 class of antidepressant medications known as selective serotonin reuptake
 inhibitors (SSRIs), and is the first and only medication approved by the FDA
 to treat social anxiety disorder.  Anxiety disorders are  caused by a
 combination of factors, one of which is an imbalance of serotonin levels in
 the brain.  SSRIs are thought to work by restoring the chemical balance.
     According to Dr. Barbara Markway, "The important thing to remember is that
 although social anxiety disorder is still highly under-recognized, effective
 treatments are available and there is hope for those who suffer from the
 condition."
 
     Meet The Authors
     Drs. Barbara and Gregory Markway will be signing copies of Painfully Shy
 at the American Psychiatric Association annual meeting on May 8, 2001 in New
 Orleans, LA.
 
 SOURCE  Barbara G. Markway, Ph.D. and Gregory P. Markway, Ph.D.