Public Meeting to Discuss Contaminated Soil at Former Pt. Mugu Missile Tracking Station

Apr 16, 2001, 01:00 ET from U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

    SACRAMENTO, Calif., April 16 /PRNewswire/ -- Removing soil contaminated
 with PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) from a former Navy missile tracking
 station now known as the Granite Canyon Marine Laboratory is the subject of a
 public meeting set for April 18 at the Best Western on 3665 Rio Road in
 Carmel.
     The laboratory is on a bluff adjacent to the Pacific Ocean in an
 undeveloped part of the California coast, 8 miles south of Carmel.
 Beginning at 5 p.m. people can stop by and talk with the experts, share their
 concerns and ideas, and ask questions about the contamination and plans to
 clean it up.  At 6:30, representatives from the Army Corps of Engineers, the
 agency charged with cleaning up the contamination, will give a short
 presentation on the clean up action.  A question and answer period will follow
 the presentation.
     Beginning in the 1960s, the Navy used the Granite Canyon site, then known
 as Point Mugu Missile Tracking Station.  In 1972, the Navy transferred the
 property to the General Services Administration, which in turn transferred it
 to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).  In 1973, NOAA
 allowed the California State Department of Fish and Game to use the site as a
 marine culture laboratory.
     The Department of Fish and Game discovered the PCB contamination in 1996
 while upgrading an underground piping system. The Corps of Engineers
 investigated and found that the contamination was most likely coming from
 leaky electrical transformers. The transformers have since been removed.
 The Corps will remove 550 cubic yards of PCB contaminated soil in middle to
 late May.  It will transport the soil by truck to the hazardous material dump
 at Kettleman, near Fresno.  The Corps will then bring in clean soil to restore
 the site.
     Information on the investigation and public meeting is available from
 Peter Broderick, Army Corps of Engineers Project Manager, at 916-557-7430.
 
 

SOURCE U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
    SACRAMENTO, Calif., April 16 /PRNewswire/ -- Removing soil contaminated
 with PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) from a former Navy missile tracking
 station now known as the Granite Canyon Marine Laboratory is the subject of a
 public meeting set for April 18 at the Best Western on 3665 Rio Road in
 Carmel.
     The laboratory is on a bluff adjacent to the Pacific Ocean in an
 undeveloped part of the California coast, 8 miles south of Carmel.
 Beginning at 5 p.m. people can stop by and talk with the experts, share their
 concerns and ideas, and ask questions about the contamination and plans to
 clean it up.  At 6:30, representatives from the Army Corps of Engineers, the
 agency charged with cleaning up the contamination, will give a short
 presentation on the clean up action.  A question and answer period will follow
 the presentation.
     Beginning in the 1960s, the Navy used the Granite Canyon site, then known
 as Point Mugu Missile Tracking Station.  In 1972, the Navy transferred the
 property to the General Services Administration, which in turn transferred it
 to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).  In 1973, NOAA
 allowed the California State Department of Fish and Game to use the site as a
 marine culture laboratory.
     The Department of Fish and Game discovered the PCB contamination in 1996
 while upgrading an underground piping system. The Corps of Engineers
 investigated and found that the contamination was most likely coming from
 leaky electrical transformers. The transformers have since been removed.
 The Corps will remove 550 cubic yards of PCB contaminated soil in middle to
 late May.  It will transport the soil by truck to the hazardous material dump
 at Kettleman, near Fresno.  The Corps will then bring in clean soil to restore
 the site.
     Information on the investigation and public meeting is available from
 Peter Broderick, Army Corps of Engineers Project Manager, at 916-557-7430.
 
 SOURCE  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers