Putting Out Fires

Nearly Half of Executives' Time Is Spent on Crises, Say Marketing

And Advertising Professionals Surveyed



Apr 05, 2001, 01:00 ET from Creative Group

    MENLO PARK, Calif., April 5 /PRNewswire/ -- Network television isn't the
 only place you can find weekly drama -- the office has its share as well,
 suggests a recent survey.  According to advertising and marketing managers
 polled, nearly half of an executive's time (43 percent) is spent responding to
 crises or problems.
     The survey was developed by The Creative Group, a specialized staffing
 service that provides marketing, advertising, creative and web professionals
 on a project basis.  It was conducted by an independent research firm and
 includes 250 responses -- 125 from advertising executives with the nation's
 1,000 largest advertising agencies and 125 from senior marketing executives
 with Fortune 1,000 companies.
     Advertising and marketing executives were asked, "In your opinion, what
 percentage of his or her time does the average executive spend responding to
 crises or problems?"  The mean response was 43 percent.
     Responding to urgent situations may be par for the course in fast-paced
 advertising and marketing environments.  But if "putting out fires" consumes a
 large part of an executive's day, he or she may not have enough time for more
 strategic tasks.
     The Creative Group offers the following suggestions for reducing time
 spent in "crisis mode":
 
     -- Ask for answers.  Encourage your employees to come to you with
        solutions -- not problems.  Approving their recommendations takes less
        time than resolving  matters yourself and helps your staff members
        develop professionally.
     -- Assign a deputy.   Authorize a trusted senior staff member to be the
        point-person when trouble arises.  He or she can decide whether it's a
        situation you need to become involved in or if it can be handled
        without your input.
     -- Trust your team.  If employees are second-guessed every time they make
        a decision, they will stop making them and turn to you instead.
        Support decisions that were made prudently, regardless of the outcome.
        If the problem was not resolved successfully, discuss with the staff
        member how to better handle similar situations in the future.
     -- Nip problems in the bud.  When confronted with a situation, such as an
        employee with a poor attitude or a vendor who doesn't meet deadlines,
        take immediate action.  A delay of even a few days can compound the
        problem.
 
     The Creative Group has offices in major markets across the United States
 and Canada and offers online job search services at www.creativegroup.com.
 
 

SOURCE Creative Group
    MENLO PARK, Calif., April 5 /PRNewswire/ -- Network television isn't the
 only place you can find weekly drama -- the office has its share as well,
 suggests a recent survey.  According to advertising and marketing managers
 polled, nearly half of an executive's time (43 percent) is spent responding to
 crises or problems.
     The survey was developed by The Creative Group, a specialized staffing
 service that provides marketing, advertising, creative and web professionals
 on a project basis.  It was conducted by an independent research firm and
 includes 250 responses -- 125 from advertising executives with the nation's
 1,000 largest advertising agencies and 125 from senior marketing executives
 with Fortune 1,000 companies.
     Advertising and marketing executives were asked, "In your opinion, what
 percentage of his or her time does the average executive spend responding to
 crises or problems?"  The mean response was 43 percent.
     Responding to urgent situations may be par for the course in fast-paced
 advertising and marketing environments.  But if "putting out fires" consumes a
 large part of an executive's day, he or she may not have enough time for more
 strategic tasks.
     The Creative Group offers the following suggestions for reducing time
 spent in "crisis mode":
 
     -- Ask for answers.  Encourage your employees to come to you with
        solutions -- not problems.  Approving their recommendations takes less
        time than resolving  matters yourself and helps your staff members
        develop professionally.
     -- Assign a deputy.   Authorize a trusted senior staff member to be the
        point-person when trouble arises.  He or she can decide whether it's a
        situation you need to become involved in or if it can be handled
        without your input.
     -- Trust your team.  If employees are second-guessed every time they make
        a decision, they will stop making them and turn to you instead.
        Support decisions that were made prudently, regardless of the outcome.
        If the problem was not resolved successfully, discuss with the staff
        member how to better handle similar situations in the future.
     -- Nip problems in the bud.  When confronted with a situation, such as an
        employee with a poor attitude or a vendor who doesn't meet deadlines,
        take immediate action.  A delay of even a few days can compound the
        problem.
 
     The Creative Group has offices in major markets across the United States
 and Canada and offers online job search services at www.creativegroup.com.
 
 SOURCE  Creative Group