Recent Accidents in California and New Jersey Shed Light On Potential Dangers of Do-it-Yourself Pest Control

Apr 11, 2001, 01:00 ET from National Pest Management Association

    WASHINGTON, April 11 /PRNewswire/ -- Media coverage of accidents involving
 home foggers and insecticide sprays used to thwart pest problems show the
 potential risks associated with untrained consumer use of over-the-counter
 pest control products.  In both incidents, consumers appeared to use excessive
 amounts of insecticide to battle a pest problem, resulting in explosions when
 the insecticide met with an open flame from a household appliance.  The result
 was serious harm to both life and property.
     "More is definitely not better when it comes to pest management," says
 Greg Baumann, Director of Field Services for the National Pest Management
 Association (NPMA).  "Consumers often have a visceral reaction to the sight of
 pests in their homes and believe an exaggerated treatment is best.  That's
 simply not the case, and why we feel it is best to leave the job to a trained
 professional."
     According to Baumann, pest management professionals have the training,
 licensing and state-of-the-art tools to detect pest problems and determine the
 correct approach to managing the situation.  The relatively untrained
 consumer, who purchases an insecticide over-the-counter, can only make an
 intuitive judgment on how to properly apply it.
     "What we often find is that consumers try one remedy after another, and in
 most cases, the pest problem remains.  That's when they call a professional,"
 says Baumann.  "But by working with a trained pest management professional
 from the start, consumers can cost effectively manage their pest problems and
 quickly remove the threat to their homes and families.  Consumers who use OTC
 products must pay careful attention to follow all label directions."
     Consumers experiencing pest problems can find information on virtually any
 pest by logging onto NPMA's Web site at http://www.pestworld.org .  By
 clicking on the "consumer" button, they can access information on how to
 diagnose a pest problem as well as find a pest management expert in their
 area.
     NPMA suggest the following guidelines for selecting a pest management
 service:
 
     *     A good place to start is to ask someone you know who has used pest
           management services. Inquire about the type of pest problem
           encountered and how satisfied were they with the service.
     *     Membership in national, and state or local pest management
           associations is a good indicator that the company has access to
           modern technical information and is committed to further education.
     *     Reach a complete understanding with the company before work starts;
           find out what the pest is, how the problem will be treated, how long
           the period of treatment will be, and what results can be expected.
     *     Be sure you know what is guaranteed and what is not.
     *     Buy value, not price. What appears to be a real bargain may need a
           second look.
     *     Check your local Better Business Bureau to see if complaints have
           been filed against the company you are considering.
 
     The National Pest Management Association is an organization with more than
 5,000 member companies across the nation.  NPMA is dedicated to promoting the
 interests and general welfare of the pest management industry and to
 conducting scientific, technical and business research in the area of pest
 management.  For more information pest management services, or to talk to a
 pest management expert, please call 800-678-6722.
 
 

SOURCE National Pest Management Association
    WASHINGTON, April 11 /PRNewswire/ -- Media coverage of accidents involving
 home foggers and insecticide sprays used to thwart pest problems show the
 potential risks associated with untrained consumer use of over-the-counter
 pest control products.  In both incidents, consumers appeared to use excessive
 amounts of insecticide to battle a pest problem, resulting in explosions when
 the insecticide met with an open flame from a household appliance.  The result
 was serious harm to both life and property.
     "More is definitely not better when it comes to pest management," says
 Greg Baumann, Director of Field Services for the National Pest Management
 Association (NPMA).  "Consumers often have a visceral reaction to the sight of
 pests in their homes and believe an exaggerated treatment is best.  That's
 simply not the case, and why we feel it is best to leave the job to a trained
 professional."
     According to Baumann, pest management professionals have the training,
 licensing and state-of-the-art tools to detect pest problems and determine the
 correct approach to managing the situation.  The relatively untrained
 consumer, who purchases an insecticide over-the-counter, can only make an
 intuitive judgment on how to properly apply it.
     "What we often find is that consumers try one remedy after another, and in
 most cases, the pest problem remains.  That's when they call a professional,"
 says Baumann.  "But by working with a trained pest management professional
 from the start, consumers can cost effectively manage their pest problems and
 quickly remove the threat to their homes and families.  Consumers who use OTC
 products must pay careful attention to follow all label directions."
     Consumers experiencing pest problems can find information on virtually any
 pest by logging onto NPMA's Web site at http://www.pestworld.org .  By
 clicking on the "consumer" button, they can access information on how to
 diagnose a pest problem as well as find a pest management expert in their
 area.
     NPMA suggest the following guidelines for selecting a pest management
 service:
 
     *     A good place to start is to ask someone you know who has used pest
           management services. Inquire about the type of pest problem
           encountered and how satisfied were they with the service.
     *     Membership in national, and state or local pest management
           associations is a good indicator that the company has access to
           modern technical information and is committed to further education.
     *     Reach a complete understanding with the company before work starts;
           find out what the pest is, how the problem will be treated, how long
           the period of treatment will be, and what results can be expected.
     *     Be sure you know what is guaranteed and what is not.
     *     Buy value, not price. What appears to be a real bargain may need a
           second look.
     *     Check your local Better Business Bureau to see if complaints have
           been filed against the company you are considering.
 
     The National Pest Management Association is an organization with more than
 5,000 member companies across the nation.  NPMA is dedicated to promoting the
 interests and general welfare of the pest management industry and to
 conducting scientific, technical and business research in the area of pest
 management.  For more information pest management services, or to talk to a
 pest management expert, please call 800-678-6722.
 
 SOURCE  National Pest Management Association