Registration Opens for Berkman Center's Online Cyberlaw Series

Apr 10, 2001, 01:00 ET from The Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard Law School

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass., April 10 /PRNewswire/ -- The Berkman Center for Internet
 & Society at Harvard Law School has opened registration for its 2001 program
 of interactive online lectures and discussions. The program explores the most
 pressing "cyberlaw" issues currently being debated by lawmakers in the United
 States and other countries: discovery in digital-age litigation and the legal
 logistics of doing business online.
     "Digital Discovery," offered to lawyers for Continuing Legal Education
 (CLE) credit, runs from April 23-30 and explores the emerging law of discovery
 in litigation of information stored in digital form -- including private email
 or personal data stored in corporate computer systems.
     "The possibility looms of creating near-perfect information systems as
 companies transform themselves from ink-on-paper to electronically networked
 environments," says Berkman Center faculty director Professor Charles Nesson,
 who will lead "Digital Discovery." "All action will be recorded, stored, and
 subject to electronic retrieval, leaving a data trail that could narrow to
 nothing the difference between what was actually done and the history that can
 be told of it. Here, in theory, is the vision -- frightening to some -- of the
 framers of the civil discovery rules come true."
     A second series, "E-Commerce: An Introduction," runs from April 30-May 11
 and is offered free to the general public. A CLE-accredited version may be
 available to lawyers in some jurisdictions on a fee basis.
     "E-Commerce: An Introduction," led by Diane Cabell, Berkman Fellow and
 supervising attorney of the Berkman Center's Clinical Program in Cyberlaw,
 will examine the major legal steps required to launch a successful online
 enterprise.
     "A successful e-commerce site looks effortless to the user," says Cabell.
 "Creating one, however, isn't as simple as it used to be. Are clickwraps valid
 contracts? Will digital signatures bind a customer to a purchase? What are an
 online consumer's privacy rights? Do online dispute resolution services
 provide reasonable due process for both buyer and seller? This series provides
 a thorough introduction to these issues for the attorney with little previous
 experience in cyberlaw."
     Participants can expect to experiment with a range of distance learning
 techniques, with many opportunities for structured discussion with fellow
 participants.
     "The program is part of the Berkman Center's hands-on research into how
 Internet teaching techniques can meaningfully augment more traditional
 pedagogy," says Berkman Center executive director Eric Saltzman. "We hope to
 attract participants eager to join us in exploring uncharted territory both in
 subject matter and educational strategy."
     Registration for the series is available via the Berkman Center's website
 at http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/online. Please note that the program is not a
 part of the Harvard Law School curriculum, and therefore inquiries should not
 be directed to the University's registrar's office.
     The Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard Law School is a
 research program founded to explore the legal, social, and political issues
 resulting from the development of the Internet and its impact on society.
 Predicated on the belief that the best way to understand cyberspace is
 actually to build out into it, the Berkman Center pursues a program of active
 research that integrates the construction and use of Internet tools with study
 of the issues the Internet engenders. As part of this active research mission,
 the Berkman Center develops, uses, and freely shares an open software platform
 for online education and deliberative processes, as well as sponsoring events
 -- ranging from informal lunches to webcast conferences -- to bring together
 its diverse network of participants for substantive debate. Visit the website
 at http://cyber.law.harvard.edu.
 
 

SOURCE The Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard Law School
    CAMBRIDGE, Mass., April 10 /PRNewswire/ -- The Berkman Center for Internet
 & Society at Harvard Law School has opened registration for its 2001 program
 of interactive online lectures and discussions. The program explores the most
 pressing "cyberlaw" issues currently being debated by lawmakers in the United
 States and other countries: discovery in digital-age litigation and the legal
 logistics of doing business online.
     "Digital Discovery," offered to lawyers for Continuing Legal Education
 (CLE) credit, runs from April 23-30 and explores the emerging law of discovery
 in litigation of information stored in digital form -- including private email
 or personal data stored in corporate computer systems.
     "The possibility looms of creating near-perfect information systems as
 companies transform themselves from ink-on-paper to electronically networked
 environments," says Berkman Center faculty director Professor Charles Nesson,
 who will lead "Digital Discovery." "All action will be recorded, stored, and
 subject to electronic retrieval, leaving a data trail that could narrow to
 nothing the difference between what was actually done and the history that can
 be told of it. Here, in theory, is the vision -- frightening to some -- of the
 framers of the civil discovery rules come true."
     A second series, "E-Commerce: An Introduction," runs from April 30-May 11
 and is offered free to the general public. A CLE-accredited version may be
 available to lawyers in some jurisdictions on a fee basis.
     "E-Commerce: An Introduction," led by Diane Cabell, Berkman Fellow and
 supervising attorney of the Berkman Center's Clinical Program in Cyberlaw,
 will examine the major legal steps required to launch a successful online
 enterprise.
     "A successful e-commerce site looks effortless to the user," says Cabell.
 "Creating one, however, isn't as simple as it used to be. Are clickwraps valid
 contracts? Will digital signatures bind a customer to a purchase? What are an
 online consumer's privacy rights? Do online dispute resolution services
 provide reasonable due process for both buyer and seller? This series provides
 a thorough introduction to these issues for the attorney with little previous
 experience in cyberlaw."
     Participants can expect to experiment with a range of distance learning
 techniques, with many opportunities for structured discussion with fellow
 participants.
     "The program is part of the Berkman Center's hands-on research into how
 Internet teaching techniques can meaningfully augment more traditional
 pedagogy," says Berkman Center executive director Eric Saltzman. "We hope to
 attract participants eager to join us in exploring uncharted territory both in
 subject matter and educational strategy."
     Registration for the series is available via the Berkman Center's website
 at http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/online. Please note that the program is not a
 part of the Harvard Law School curriculum, and therefore inquiries should not
 be directed to the University's registrar's office.
     The Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard Law School is a
 research program founded to explore the legal, social, and political issues
 resulting from the development of the Internet and its impact on society.
 Predicated on the belief that the best way to understand cyberspace is
 actually to build out into it, the Berkman Center pursues a program of active
 research that integrates the construction and use of Internet tools with study
 of the issues the Internet engenders. As part of this active research mission,
 the Berkman Center develops, uses, and freely shares an open software platform
 for online education and deliberative processes, as well as sponsoring events
 -- ranging from informal lunches to webcast conferences -- to bring together
 its diverse network of participants for substantive debate. Visit the website
 at http://cyber.law.harvard.edu.
 
 SOURCE  The Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard Law School