Researchers Recommend Design Change in Bungee Cords to Prevent Serious Eye Injuries

Apr 03, 2001, 01:00 ET from American Academy of Ophthalmology

    SAN FRANCISCO, April 3 /PRNewswire/ -- Bungee cords are becoming an
 increasingly common cause of both severe blunt and penetrating eye injuries,
 according to a study published in the April 2001 issue of Ophthalmology, the
 clinical journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology -- The Eye M.D.
 Association.
     (Photo:  http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20000323/SFTHFNS1 )
     In the study, researchers reviewed medical records of 67 people treated
 for bungee cord eye injuries at Wills Eye Hospital, in Philadelphia.  The
 injuries, occurring over a five-year period, required hospitalization for more
 than one-half of the patients and surgery for nearly one-third of the
 patients.  One-fifth of the patients experienced some profound permanent
 vision loss.
     The study showed bungee cords caused a wide range of injuries, the most
 common of which were blood inside the eye, contusions to the retina, bruising
 and swelling of the eyelids, and penetration of the eyeball.  The study also
 showed:
 
     -- Most of those injured were males.
     -- Although workplace injuries were more common during the first two years
        of the study period, recreational injuries were more common during the
        last two years.
     -- The number of injuries continually increased over time.
     -- Most of the injuries occurred when one of the bungee cord hooks was
        released from the object it was secured to, rather than cord or hook
        failure.
     -- None of the patients was wearing eye protection at the time of the
        injuries.
 
     Researchers recommend manufactures make bungee cords safer by replacing
 the J or S-shaped hooks with a spring-loaded gate clip, which prevents the
 hook from releasing unless the gate is depressed.  In the meantime,
 researchers suggest the use of printed warnings about the potential for eye
 injuries.  The authors also stressed the need for caution by the bungee cord
 users themselves-make sure the hooks are adequately secured prior to letting
 go of the cord and use protective eyewear whenever possible.
     The Academy is the world's largest association of eye physicians and
 surgeons -- Eye M.D.s -- with more than 27,000 members.  For more information
 about eye healthcare, visit the Academy's partner website at www.medem.com.
 
 

SOURCE American Academy of Ophthalmology
    SAN FRANCISCO, April 3 /PRNewswire/ -- Bungee cords are becoming an
 increasingly common cause of both severe blunt and penetrating eye injuries,
 according to a study published in the April 2001 issue of Ophthalmology, the
 clinical journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology -- The Eye M.D.
 Association.
     (Photo:  http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20000323/SFTHFNS1 )
     In the study, researchers reviewed medical records of 67 people treated
 for bungee cord eye injuries at Wills Eye Hospital, in Philadelphia.  The
 injuries, occurring over a five-year period, required hospitalization for more
 than one-half of the patients and surgery for nearly one-third of the
 patients.  One-fifth of the patients experienced some profound permanent
 vision loss.
     The study showed bungee cords caused a wide range of injuries, the most
 common of which were blood inside the eye, contusions to the retina, bruising
 and swelling of the eyelids, and penetration of the eyeball.  The study also
 showed:
 
     -- Most of those injured were males.
     -- Although workplace injuries were more common during the first two years
        of the study period, recreational injuries were more common during the
        last two years.
     -- The number of injuries continually increased over time.
     -- Most of the injuries occurred when one of the bungee cord hooks was
        released from the object it was secured to, rather than cord or hook
        failure.
     -- None of the patients was wearing eye protection at the time of the
        injuries.
 
     Researchers recommend manufactures make bungee cords safer by replacing
 the J or S-shaped hooks with a spring-loaded gate clip, which prevents the
 hook from releasing unless the gate is depressed.  In the meantime,
 researchers suggest the use of printed warnings about the potential for eye
 injuries.  The authors also stressed the need for caution by the bungee cord
 users themselves-make sure the hooks are adequately secured prior to letting
 go of the cord and use protective eyewear whenever possible.
     The Academy is the world's largest association of eye physicians and
 surgeons -- Eye M.D.s -- with more than 27,000 members.  For more information
 about eye healthcare, visit the Academy's partner website at www.medem.com.
 
 SOURCE  American Academy of Ophthalmology