Response to Child Care Study Linking Day Care to Aggression

Apr 19, 2001, 01:00 ET from Children's World Learning Centers

    DENVER, April 19 /PRNewswire/ -- In response to the study released today
 linking day care to child aggression, Children's World Learning Centers, a
 leading provider of quality care and education in the U.S. is providing the
 following information:
     "Based on the initial brief summary we've seen on the report, Children's
 World Learning Centers does not agree with the preliminary reported findings
 of this study.  We believe it is very dangerous to make this type of a report
 available to parents who do not have all the facts.  It is very important in
 any type of a research situation for all the data to be analyzed in order to
 understand the full impact of the findings.
    'The reality is, is that parents need child care,' said Duane V. Larson,
 president and COO of Children's World.  'And this type of announcement in the
 media makes parents feel uneasy about an already difficult decision when past
 studies indicate that children in a quality environment do better in school.'
     In fact, findings in a study released by the National Institute of
 National Health and Human Development in 1999, indicate that higher quality
 care was found to be related to fewer reports of children's problem behaviors,
 higher cognitive performance, language ability and level of school readiness.
 We know that stronger language development can be directly linked to positive
 behavior in children, because children whose language is more developed are
 better equipped to handle conflict through using words instead of aggressive
 behavior.
     The key to all of this that parents need to understand is that if their
 children are in a high quality program, they are helping their children to be
 successful.  Parents should look for programs that are accredited or are in
 the accreditation process, and that include curriculum that integrates
 educational components with social skills and positive guidance throughout the
 day."
 
 

SOURCE Children's World Learning Centers
    DENVER, April 19 /PRNewswire/ -- In response to the study released today
 linking day care to child aggression, Children's World Learning Centers, a
 leading provider of quality care and education in the U.S. is providing the
 following information:
     "Based on the initial brief summary we've seen on the report, Children's
 World Learning Centers does not agree with the preliminary reported findings
 of this study.  We believe it is very dangerous to make this type of a report
 available to parents who do not have all the facts.  It is very important in
 any type of a research situation for all the data to be analyzed in order to
 understand the full impact of the findings.
    'The reality is, is that parents need child care,' said Duane V. Larson,
 president and COO of Children's World.  'And this type of announcement in the
 media makes parents feel uneasy about an already difficult decision when past
 studies indicate that children in a quality environment do better in school.'
     In fact, findings in a study released by the National Institute of
 National Health and Human Development in 1999, indicate that higher quality
 care was found to be related to fewer reports of children's problem behaviors,
 higher cognitive performance, language ability and level of school readiness.
 We know that stronger language development can be directly linked to positive
 behavior in children, because children whose language is more developed are
 better equipped to handle conflict through using words instead of aggressive
 behavior.
     The key to all of this that parents need to understand is that if their
 children are in a high quality program, they are helping their children to be
 successful.  Parents should look for programs that are accredited or are in
 the accreditation process, and that include curriculum that integrates
 educational components with social skills and positive guidance throughout the
 day."
 
 SOURCE  Children's World Learning Centers