Richard Brookhiser to Give Keynote at The Hamilton Conference

Apr 02, 2001, 01:00 ET from Hamilton College

    CLINTON, N.Y., April 2 /PRNewswire/ -- Richard Brookhiser, author of
 Alexander Hamilton, American, will be the keynote speaker at The Hamilton
 Conference at Hamilton College.  The conference, which examines the life and
 legacy of Alexander Hamilton, takes place from Thursday, April 5, to Saturday,
 April 7.  The keynote address, "Alexander Hamilton: His Success and His
 Failures," will take place on Thursday at 7:30 p.m. in the Hamilton College
 Chapel.
     Richard Brookhiser is the author of Founding Father: Rediscovering George
 Washington, and The Way of the WASP.  Brookhiser is also the senior editor at
 The National Review and a columnist at the New York Observer.  He writes for
 numerous magazines and newspapers, including Time, Vanity Fair, and The New
 York Times.  He also appears frequently on Charlie Rose, Politically
 Incorrect, and C-SPAN.
     This conference, which is free and open to the public, will bring together
 wide range of scholars who will examine and analyze the historical
 significance of Alexander Hamilton to American political, economic, and
 intellectual life.  Brookhiser's address will be followed on Friday and
 Saturday with sessions that will feature both young and well-established
 scholars who will examine various aspects of Hamilton, his era, and his
 legacy.
     According to Doug Ambrose, conference coordinator and Hamilton College
 associate professor of history, "We must remember Hamilton's pivotal role in
 the formation of the United States and his contributions to the still
 unfinished importance to U.S. history and to the ongoing story of our nation.
 This does not only mean that we should simply praise him, but we should
 recognize Hamilton's historical significance. "
 
     The Hamilton Conference: Exploring the Life and Legacy of Alexander
 Hamilton
     The first session on Friday, April 6, at 9:30 a.m. is on "Hamilton and the
 Dilemmas of Slavery in the Young Republic."  Hamilton was one of the first
 public figures to publicly denounce slavery.  This panel will discuss the role
 of slavery in the early republic and the ways it increasingly became an issue
 in public discourse.
     The second session on Friday, at 2 p.m. is  "Hamilton and Domestic
 Policy."  Participants will debate Hamilton's economic and fiscal policies and
 beliefs; his views on the national debt; his promotion of manufacturing and
 his understanding of the nature of citizenship in the American republic.
     The Saturday, April 7, 9:30 a.m. panel on "Hamilton's Legacy" will touch
 upon the ways Hamilton's ideas have influenced, and continue to influence, the
 United States.  This includes how American's have portrayed Hamilton and how
 he influenced such figures as Abraham Lincoln.
     The last panel is at 2 p.m. and is on  "Hamilton and His Contemporaries."
 This panel will address how Hamilton and his contemporaries, James Madison and
 Thomas Jefferson, shaped political discussion.  Hamilton's vision of America
 directly contrasts to that of Madison's and Jefferson's.  Hamilton envisioned
 a vigorous national government, while Jeffersonians emphasized a limited
 national government where states have a prominent role in the lives of its
 citizens.
 
     For more information please go to http://alexander.hamilton.edu/conference
 or contact Doug Ambrose at 315-859-4134 or dambrose@hamilton.edu.
 
 

SOURCE Hamilton College
    CLINTON, N.Y., April 2 /PRNewswire/ -- Richard Brookhiser, author of
 Alexander Hamilton, American, will be the keynote speaker at The Hamilton
 Conference at Hamilton College.  The conference, which examines the life and
 legacy of Alexander Hamilton, takes place from Thursday, April 5, to Saturday,
 April 7.  The keynote address, "Alexander Hamilton: His Success and His
 Failures," will take place on Thursday at 7:30 p.m. in the Hamilton College
 Chapel.
     Richard Brookhiser is the author of Founding Father: Rediscovering George
 Washington, and The Way of the WASP.  Brookhiser is also the senior editor at
 The National Review and a columnist at the New York Observer.  He writes for
 numerous magazines and newspapers, including Time, Vanity Fair, and The New
 York Times.  He also appears frequently on Charlie Rose, Politically
 Incorrect, and C-SPAN.
     This conference, which is free and open to the public, will bring together
 wide range of scholars who will examine and analyze the historical
 significance of Alexander Hamilton to American political, economic, and
 intellectual life.  Brookhiser's address will be followed on Friday and
 Saturday with sessions that will feature both young and well-established
 scholars who will examine various aspects of Hamilton, his era, and his
 legacy.
     According to Doug Ambrose, conference coordinator and Hamilton College
 associate professor of history, "We must remember Hamilton's pivotal role in
 the formation of the United States and his contributions to the still
 unfinished importance to U.S. history and to the ongoing story of our nation.
 This does not only mean that we should simply praise him, but we should
 recognize Hamilton's historical significance. "
 
     The Hamilton Conference: Exploring the Life and Legacy of Alexander
 Hamilton
     The first session on Friday, April 6, at 9:30 a.m. is on "Hamilton and the
 Dilemmas of Slavery in the Young Republic."  Hamilton was one of the first
 public figures to publicly denounce slavery.  This panel will discuss the role
 of slavery in the early republic and the ways it increasingly became an issue
 in public discourse.
     The second session on Friday, at 2 p.m. is  "Hamilton and Domestic
 Policy."  Participants will debate Hamilton's economic and fiscal policies and
 beliefs; his views on the national debt; his promotion of manufacturing and
 his understanding of the nature of citizenship in the American republic.
     The Saturday, April 7, 9:30 a.m. panel on "Hamilton's Legacy" will touch
 upon the ways Hamilton's ideas have influenced, and continue to influence, the
 United States.  This includes how American's have portrayed Hamilton and how
 he influenced such figures as Abraham Lincoln.
     The last panel is at 2 p.m. and is on  "Hamilton and His Contemporaries."
 This panel will address how Hamilton and his contemporaries, James Madison and
 Thomas Jefferson, shaped political discussion.  Hamilton's vision of America
 directly contrasts to that of Madison's and Jefferson's.  Hamilton envisioned
 a vigorous national government, while Jeffersonians emphasized a limited
 national government where states have a prominent role in the lives of its
 citizens.
 
     For more information please go to http://alexander.hamilton.edu/conference
 or contact Doug Ambrose at 315-859-4134 or dambrose@hamilton.edu.
 
 SOURCE  Hamilton College