San Francisco Giants and The American Academy of Dermatology Launch Annual Initiative to Strike Out Skin Cancer

Apr 25, 2001, 01:00 ET from American Academy of Dermatology

    NEW YORK, April 25 /PRNewswire/ -- The San Francisco Giants and the
 American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) are asking fans to step up to the plate
 and help strike out skin cancer by practicing sun-safe behavior and conducting
 skin self-examinations.  The Giants will demonstrate the importance of skin
 cancer prevention and detection when players, coaches, front office staff and
 family members are screened for skin cancer on Melanoma Monday, May 7.
     Melanoma Monday, now in its seventh year, has been designated by the AAD
 as "National Skin Self-Examination Day" in order to raise awareness about
 melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, and encourage Americans to begin
 a lifelong habit of regular skin self-examinations.
     The screening also marks the beginning of the third annual National Sports
 Skin Cancer Awareness Program, a public education campaign partnering the AAD
 with Major League Baseball and the Major League Baseball Players Association.
 The campaign encourages baseball players and their fans to Play Smart When It
 Comes to the Sun and is designed to raise awareness about skin cancer, the
 most common form of cancer in the United States.  In addition to the Giants,
 Major League Baseball teams throughout the country will be screened for skin
 cancer during the season by local dermatologists in their areas.
     Skin cancer affects 1 in 5 Americans, and more than 1 million new cases
 are diagnosed each year.  Of these cases, more than 51,400 are melanoma, a
 cancer that claims 7,800 lives each year.  Skin cancer is a threat
 particularly for professional baseball players and their fans because of the
 many hours spent in the midday sun, a major risk factor for developing the
 disease.
     "Skin cancer is one of the easiest cancers to detect in its earliest
 stages because the signs are right there on the surface of the skin," said
 Ronald G. Wheeland, MD, President of the American Academy of Dermatology.  "By
 participating in the skin cancer screenings, the Giants are serving as
 important role models for their fans.  We encourage everyone to follow their
 lead by practicing sun-safe behaviors and conducting skin self-examinations."
     Skin self-examinations consist of regularly looking over the entire body,
 including the back, scalp, soles of feet, between the toes and on the palms of
 the hands.  If there are any changes in the size, color, shape or texture of a
 mole, the development of a new mole, or any other unusual changes in the skin,
 you should see your dermatologist immediately.
     No one knows the importance of skin self-examination more than Giants
 pitcher Kirk Reuter, whose mother died of melanoma.
     "I know firsthand how important prevention and early detection is to
 fighting this potentially deadly disease," Reuter said.   "We hope our fans
 also understand its importance and protect themselves and their families from
 the dangers of the sun by wearing sunscreen and hats when they come out to the
 ballpark."
     Like the Giants, consumers also can participate in skin cancer screenings
 throughout the year.  Nearly 2,000 volunteer dermatologists across the country
 will offer free screenings at local hospitals, work places, health fairs and
 other locations.  More information on free skin cancer screenings is available
 on the AAD's web site at www.aad.org .
     Since 1985, volunteer dermatologists have conducted more than 1.2 million
 screenings and have detected more than 116,000 suspicious lesions, including
 15,150 suspected melanomas.
     Sun exposure is the most preventable risk for melanoma.  The AAD
 recommends that everyone follow these sun protection guidelines:
 
      -- Avoid outdoor activities between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. when the sun's
         rays are the strongest;
      -- Seek shade whenever possible;
      -- Wear a broad-spectrum sunscreen with a Sun Protection Factor (SPF) of
         15 or higher;
      -- Wear sun-protective clothing and accessories, such as wide-brimmed
         hats and sunglasses; and
      -- Follow the "Shadow Rule" -- if your shadow is shorter than you are,
         the sun's damaging rays are at their strongest and you are likely to
         sunburn.
 
     The American Academy of Dermatology, founded in 1938, is the largest, most
 influential, and most representative of all dermatologic associations.  With a
 membership of over 13,000 dermatologists worldwide, the Academy is committed
 to:  advancing the science and art of medicine and surgery related to the
 skin; advocating high standards in clinical practice, education, and research
 in dermatology; supporting and enhancing patient care; and promoting a
 lifetime of healthier skin, hair, and nails.  For more information, contact
 the AAD at 1-888-462-DERM (3376) or www.aad.org .
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X48883852
 
 

SOURCE American Academy of Dermatology
    NEW YORK, April 25 /PRNewswire/ -- The San Francisco Giants and the
 American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) are asking fans to step up to the plate
 and help strike out skin cancer by practicing sun-safe behavior and conducting
 skin self-examinations.  The Giants will demonstrate the importance of skin
 cancer prevention and detection when players, coaches, front office staff and
 family members are screened for skin cancer on Melanoma Monday, May 7.
     Melanoma Monday, now in its seventh year, has been designated by the AAD
 as "National Skin Self-Examination Day" in order to raise awareness about
 melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, and encourage Americans to begin
 a lifelong habit of regular skin self-examinations.
     The screening also marks the beginning of the third annual National Sports
 Skin Cancer Awareness Program, a public education campaign partnering the AAD
 with Major League Baseball and the Major League Baseball Players Association.
 The campaign encourages baseball players and their fans to Play Smart When It
 Comes to the Sun and is designed to raise awareness about skin cancer, the
 most common form of cancer in the United States.  In addition to the Giants,
 Major League Baseball teams throughout the country will be screened for skin
 cancer during the season by local dermatologists in their areas.
     Skin cancer affects 1 in 5 Americans, and more than 1 million new cases
 are diagnosed each year.  Of these cases, more than 51,400 are melanoma, a
 cancer that claims 7,800 lives each year.  Skin cancer is a threat
 particularly for professional baseball players and their fans because of the
 many hours spent in the midday sun, a major risk factor for developing the
 disease.
     "Skin cancer is one of the easiest cancers to detect in its earliest
 stages because the signs are right there on the surface of the skin," said
 Ronald G. Wheeland, MD, President of the American Academy of Dermatology.  "By
 participating in the skin cancer screenings, the Giants are serving as
 important role models for their fans.  We encourage everyone to follow their
 lead by practicing sun-safe behaviors and conducting skin self-examinations."
     Skin self-examinations consist of regularly looking over the entire body,
 including the back, scalp, soles of feet, between the toes and on the palms of
 the hands.  If there are any changes in the size, color, shape or texture of a
 mole, the development of a new mole, or any other unusual changes in the skin,
 you should see your dermatologist immediately.
     No one knows the importance of skin self-examination more than Giants
 pitcher Kirk Reuter, whose mother died of melanoma.
     "I know firsthand how important prevention and early detection is to
 fighting this potentially deadly disease," Reuter said.   "We hope our fans
 also understand its importance and protect themselves and their families from
 the dangers of the sun by wearing sunscreen and hats when they come out to the
 ballpark."
     Like the Giants, consumers also can participate in skin cancer screenings
 throughout the year.  Nearly 2,000 volunteer dermatologists across the country
 will offer free screenings at local hospitals, work places, health fairs and
 other locations.  More information on free skin cancer screenings is available
 on the AAD's web site at www.aad.org .
     Since 1985, volunteer dermatologists have conducted more than 1.2 million
 screenings and have detected more than 116,000 suspicious lesions, including
 15,150 suspected melanomas.
     Sun exposure is the most preventable risk for melanoma.  The AAD
 recommends that everyone follow these sun protection guidelines:
 
      -- Avoid outdoor activities between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. when the sun's
         rays are the strongest;
      -- Seek shade whenever possible;
      -- Wear a broad-spectrum sunscreen with a Sun Protection Factor (SPF) of
         15 or higher;
      -- Wear sun-protective clothing and accessories, such as wide-brimmed
         hats and sunglasses; and
      -- Follow the "Shadow Rule" -- if your shadow is shorter than you are,
         the sun's damaging rays are at their strongest and you are likely to
         sunburn.
 
     The American Academy of Dermatology, founded in 1938, is the largest, most
 influential, and most representative of all dermatologic associations.  With a
 membership of over 13,000 dermatologists worldwide, the Academy is committed
 to:  advancing the science and art of medicine and surgery related to the
 skin; advocating high standards in clinical practice, education, and research
 in dermatology; supporting and enhancing patient care; and promoting a
 lifetime of healthier skin, hair, and nails.  For more information, contact
 the AAD at 1-888-462-DERM (3376) or www.aad.org .
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X48883852
 
 SOURCE  American Academy of Dermatology