Scientists Invite Others to Join Them Online to Discuss Exotic Species Threat

Apr 16, 2001, 01:00 ET from American Phytopathological Society

    ST. PAUL, Minn., April 16 /PRNewswire/ -- Though not usually considered a
 national security threat, insects that find their way into new countries can
 wreak havoc on forests and agricultural plants, causing untold devastation to
 the countries they enter.  There is enough concern that scientists, businesses
 and government representatives from around the world will be "meeting" via the
 Internet April 16-29 to participate in "The Risks of Exotic Forest Pests and
 Their Impact on Trade," an online presentation and discussion on how to reduce
 the movement of insects, diseases, and other pests across countries.  The
 event is free of charge and open to anyone interested in participating.
     "Many countries are currently spending millions of dollars each year in an
 effort to prevent exotic pests from entering and spreading in their countries,
 yet it's still a huge problem," says Dr. Kerry Britton, a Forest Pathologist
 with the USDA Forest Service.  "The sheer volume of global shipping today has
 amplified the danger beyond the scale of the regulatory barriers we currently
 have in place. It's time for us to take a fresh look at the problem and begin
 to develop options for dealing with it on a global scale."
     The online meeting will feature presentations from more than 60 authors on
 issues involving the hazards and economic impacts of some of the more newly
 introduced pests, the impact of exotic pests on international trade, and
 methods for preventing pests from hitchhiking to other countries.  Other
 topics of discussion will include the impact of exotic pests on forest and
 landscape trees, pests of particular concern and how to control them, and
 proposed guidelines, standards and regulations.
     Event organizers encourage anyone interested in the subject to log on
 during the interactive sessions beginning April 16 and running through April
 29th. There is no cost and anyone may participate.  The meeting's website can
 be found at http://exoticpests.apsnet.org/ .
     The American Phytopathological Society (APS) is one of the sponsors of
 "The Risks of Exotic Forest Pests and Their Impact on Trade."  APS is a
 non-profit, professional scientific organization dedicated to the study and
 control of plant diseases, with 5,000 members worldwide.
 
 

SOURCE American Phytopathological Society
    ST. PAUL, Minn., April 16 /PRNewswire/ -- Though not usually considered a
 national security threat, insects that find their way into new countries can
 wreak havoc on forests and agricultural plants, causing untold devastation to
 the countries they enter.  There is enough concern that scientists, businesses
 and government representatives from around the world will be "meeting" via the
 Internet April 16-29 to participate in "The Risks of Exotic Forest Pests and
 Their Impact on Trade," an online presentation and discussion on how to reduce
 the movement of insects, diseases, and other pests across countries.  The
 event is free of charge and open to anyone interested in participating.
     "Many countries are currently spending millions of dollars each year in an
 effort to prevent exotic pests from entering and spreading in their countries,
 yet it's still a huge problem," says Dr. Kerry Britton, a Forest Pathologist
 with the USDA Forest Service.  "The sheer volume of global shipping today has
 amplified the danger beyond the scale of the regulatory barriers we currently
 have in place. It's time for us to take a fresh look at the problem and begin
 to develop options for dealing with it on a global scale."
     The online meeting will feature presentations from more than 60 authors on
 issues involving the hazards and economic impacts of some of the more newly
 introduced pests, the impact of exotic pests on international trade, and
 methods for preventing pests from hitchhiking to other countries.  Other
 topics of discussion will include the impact of exotic pests on forest and
 landscape trees, pests of particular concern and how to control them, and
 proposed guidelines, standards and regulations.
     Event organizers encourage anyone interested in the subject to log on
 during the interactive sessions beginning April 16 and running through April
 29th. There is no cost and anyone may participate.  The meeting's website can
 be found at http://exoticpests.apsnet.org/ .
     The American Phytopathological Society (APS) is one of the sponsors of
 "The Risks of Exotic Forest Pests and Their Impact on Trade."  APS is a
 non-profit, professional scientific organization dedicated to the study and
 control of plant diseases, with 5,000 members worldwide.
 
 SOURCE  American Phytopathological Society