Shelter for Homeless Single Women Closes Its Doors Today; National Singles Organization Comes to the Rescue

Apr 05, 2001, 01:00 ET from American Association for Single People

    LOS ANGELES, April 5 /PRNewswire/ -- The American Association for Single
 People today announced an $80,000 challenge grant to help the Union Rescue
 Mission reopen its Single Women's Shelter.  A 110-bed dorm which provides a
 bed and a shower to thousands of single women in Los Angeles each year closed
 its doors at 7:00 a.m. this morning due to lack of funds.
     That section of the shelter will not reopen until $320,000 is raised --
 the annual cost of operating the single women's dorm.
     AASP's donation involves a 3 to 1 challenge grant, which means that for
 every three dollars in new donations to the Mission's single women's shelter
 fund, AASP will give one dollar -- up to a maximum of $80,000.
     KRLA radio in Glendale has pledged that it will help raise these matching
 funds by devoting air time each day to invite its listeners to contribute to
 this worthy cause.
     "Single People Helping Single People" is the theme of AASP's challenge
 grant.
     "We chose that theme for two good reasons," said AASP's Executive
 Director, Thomas F. Coleman.
     "First, we want the general public to move beyond the stereotype that
 single people are selfish and only interested in dating and socializing," he
 said.  "But more so because this theme invites, indeed challenges, millions of
 single people in the Los Angeles area to come forward to help other single
 people who are in desperate need of temporary shelter."
     There are more than 1.8 million unmarried adults in the City of
 Los Angeles alone, and millions of single, divorced, and widowed adults in
 surrounding communities.  AASP is asking single and unmarried people in this
 area to make generous donations to the Single Women's Shelter Fund at the
 Union Rescue Mission.
     "The single women's dorm could be reopened within a week if even a small
 fraction of the unmarried population in Los Angeles County were to give just
 $8.00 each to this fund," said AASP's Director of Public Affairs, Stephanie
 Knapik.  It costs the Mission about $8.00 to provide safe shelter and a shower
 to one woman for one night.
     A few members of AASP gathered at its Glendale headquarters last Sunday to
 provide an example for other single people by making individual donations over
 and above the grant from the organization.
     Anita Patino, a widow who lives on a fixed income in East Los Angeles,
 said, "I can't afford to give much, but the least I can do is to help shelter
 one woman for one night.  Here's my check for $8."
     Michael Vasquez, production manager for AASP who gave a donation of
 $56, said, "I make a modest salary but I can afford to help house a woman in
 need for one week."
     Bella DePaulo, a social psychologist in Santa Barbara who is studying
 people who are single, said, "My check for $112 is an investment in the future
 of single women.  These kinds of small investments in human capital can be the
 richest and most rewarding of all, in that they can turn a life around and pay
 dividends of a lifetime of productivity and contributions to society."
     The American Association for Single People is a nonprofit and nonpartisan
 organization promoting the well being and human rights of unmarried
 individuals, couples, parents, and families.  Any adult can become a member of
 AASP by making a tax-deductible donation of $10 or more.
     The group has members throughout the nation.  Its educational projects
 promote equal rights for unmarried people in the workplace, marketplace, and
 government programs.
     AASP is providing a collective voice for the 82 million single and
 unmarried adults in the nation.  It hopes to do for single adults of all ages
 what AARP has done for seniors, namely, to put a group of previously
 unrepresented people on the political map.
     "We want elected officials, political party leaders, corporate executives,
 and union bosses to pay attention to the needs of unmarried Americans," said
 Coleman.  "Unmarried adults are being forced to pay more than our fair share
 of taxes, we are often required to pay higher insurance premiums, and to rub
 salt into the wounds, we are being paid significantly less than married
 workers when it comes to benefits compensation," he added.
     AASP seeks to end marital status discrimination in employment, housing,
 credit, insurance, taxes, business transactions, and government programs.
     "Even though most of our projects involve helping single people as
 employees, consumers, and taxpayers, we also care about single people living
 in poverty," Coleman explained.  "Despite the fact that our plate was already
 filled with projects focusing on unfair treatment of unmarried wage earners
 and taxpayers, we could not sit back and let this single women's shelter close
 its doors without doing something to help."
     AASP has devoted a section of its website to the Single Women's Shelter
 Fund, including information on how people can make donations.
     For those who do not have access to the Internet, there are other ways for
 them to donate.  For example, they can make a check payable to Union Rescue
 Mission with a note at the bottom indicating it is for the single women's
 shelter fund.  If single people want to send the checks to AASP, we would then
 forward the donations to the Mission.
 
     AASP is located at 415 E. Harvard Street, Suite 204, Glendale, CA 91205.
 Individuals and organizations who would like to donate to this fund may call
 (818) 242-5157.
 
     Reporters seeking interviews or other information may contact AASP's
 Director of Public Affairs, Stephanie Knapik, at (818) 242-5124.
 
     More details about the shelter crisis, including photos of the single
 women's dorm, homeless women, and AASP members donating to the cause, visit
 the organization's website at:
 http://www.unmarriedamerica.com/shelter-fund/shelter-fund-entry.html
 
 

SOURCE American Association for Single People
    LOS ANGELES, April 5 /PRNewswire/ -- The American Association for Single
 People today announced an $80,000 challenge grant to help the Union Rescue
 Mission reopen its Single Women's Shelter.  A 110-bed dorm which provides a
 bed and a shower to thousands of single women in Los Angeles each year closed
 its doors at 7:00 a.m. this morning due to lack of funds.
     That section of the shelter will not reopen until $320,000 is raised --
 the annual cost of operating the single women's dorm.
     AASP's donation involves a 3 to 1 challenge grant, which means that for
 every three dollars in new donations to the Mission's single women's shelter
 fund, AASP will give one dollar -- up to a maximum of $80,000.
     KRLA radio in Glendale has pledged that it will help raise these matching
 funds by devoting air time each day to invite its listeners to contribute to
 this worthy cause.
     "Single People Helping Single People" is the theme of AASP's challenge
 grant.
     "We chose that theme for two good reasons," said AASP's Executive
 Director, Thomas F. Coleman.
     "First, we want the general public to move beyond the stereotype that
 single people are selfish and only interested in dating and socializing," he
 said.  "But more so because this theme invites, indeed challenges, millions of
 single people in the Los Angeles area to come forward to help other single
 people who are in desperate need of temporary shelter."
     There are more than 1.8 million unmarried adults in the City of
 Los Angeles alone, and millions of single, divorced, and widowed adults in
 surrounding communities.  AASP is asking single and unmarried people in this
 area to make generous donations to the Single Women's Shelter Fund at the
 Union Rescue Mission.
     "The single women's dorm could be reopened within a week if even a small
 fraction of the unmarried population in Los Angeles County were to give just
 $8.00 each to this fund," said AASP's Director of Public Affairs, Stephanie
 Knapik.  It costs the Mission about $8.00 to provide safe shelter and a shower
 to one woman for one night.
     A few members of AASP gathered at its Glendale headquarters last Sunday to
 provide an example for other single people by making individual donations over
 and above the grant from the organization.
     Anita Patino, a widow who lives on a fixed income in East Los Angeles,
 said, "I can't afford to give much, but the least I can do is to help shelter
 one woman for one night.  Here's my check for $8."
     Michael Vasquez, production manager for AASP who gave a donation of
 $56, said, "I make a modest salary but I can afford to help house a woman in
 need for one week."
     Bella DePaulo, a social psychologist in Santa Barbara who is studying
 people who are single, said, "My check for $112 is an investment in the future
 of single women.  These kinds of small investments in human capital can be the
 richest and most rewarding of all, in that they can turn a life around and pay
 dividends of a lifetime of productivity and contributions to society."
     The American Association for Single People is a nonprofit and nonpartisan
 organization promoting the well being and human rights of unmarried
 individuals, couples, parents, and families.  Any adult can become a member of
 AASP by making a tax-deductible donation of $10 or more.
     The group has members throughout the nation.  Its educational projects
 promote equal rights for unmarried people in the workplace, marketplace, and
 government programs.
     AASP is providing a collective voice for the 82 million single and
 unmarried adults in the nation.  It hopes to do for single adults of all ages
 what AARP has done for seniors, namely, to put a group of previously
 unrepresented people on the political map.
     "We want elected officials, political party leaders, corporate executives,
 and union bosses to pay attention to the needs of unmarried Americans," said
 Coleman.  "Unmarried adults are being forced to pay more than our fair share
 of taxes, we are often required to pay higher insurance premiums, and to rub
 salt into the wounds, we are being paid significantly less than married
 workers when it comes to benefits compensation," he added.
     AASP seeks to end marital status discrimination in employment, housing,
 credit, insurance, taxes, business transactions, and government programs.
     "Even though most of our projects involve helping single people as
 employees, consumers, and taxpayers, we also care about single people living
 in poverty," Coleman explained.  "Despite the fact that our plate was already
 filled with projects focusing on unfair treatment of unmarried wage earners
 and taxpayers, we could not sit back and let this single women's shelter close
 its doors without doing something to help."
     AASP has devoted a section of its website to the Single Women's Shelter
 Fund, including information on how people can make donations.
     For those who do not have access to the Internet, there are other ways for
 them to donate.  For example, they can make a check payable to Union Rescue
 Mission with a note at the bottom indicating it is for the single women's
 shelter fund.  If single people want to send the checks to AASP, we would then
 forward the donations to the Mission.
 
     AASP is located at 415 E. Harvard Street, Suite 204, Glendale, CA 91205.
 Individuals and organizations who would like to donate to this fund may call
 (818) 242-5157.
 
     Reporters seeking interviews or other information may contact AASP's
 Director of Public Affairs, Stephanie Knapik, at (818) 242-5124.
 
     More details about the shelter crisis, including photos of the single
 women's dorm, homeless women, and AASP members donating to the cause, visit
 the organization's website at:
 http://www.unmarriedamerica.com/shelter-fund/shelter-fund-entry.html
 
 SOURCE  American Association for Single People