Statement by EgyptAir on Upcoming NTSB Draft Investigative Report on Flight 990

Apr 18, 2001, 01:00 ET from EgyptAir

    WASHINGTON, April 18 /PRNewswire/ -- The following is a statement by
 EgyptAir on the upcoming NTSB draft investigative report on EgyptAir
 Flight 990:
 
     "The National Transportation Safety Board's (NTSB) draft investigative
 report on the EgyptAir Flight 990 accident is expected to be completed soon.
 Upon receipt of the report, the Egyptian Civil Aviation Authority will have 60
 days to review the draft and offer comments prior to the publication of the
 final report.
     From the beginning, Egyptian investigators have maintained the flight
 control system aboard the Boeing 767 demands further testing and evaluation to
 confirm its safety and reliability.  This investigation and other Boeing 767
 problems have raised serious questions about the integrity of the elevator
 control system, which makes the aircraft go up and down.
     Recent incidents involving Boeing 767 flight control problems -- an
 American Airlines Boeing 767 which experienced jammed elevator controls
 approaching Paris, a Gulf Air Boeing 767 in Bahrain where a critical sheared
 rivet was found, and previous documented anomalies including an AeroMexico
 Boeing 767 that was found to have the same sheared rivets in two different
 areas of the elevator control system -- should give cause to both the NTSB and
 Boeing to further investigate the 767 flight control system.  The Federal
 Aviation Administration (FAA) issued airworthiness directives in August 2000
 and again in March 2001 that alerted operators of Boeing 767 aircraft about an
 "unsafe condition" with the elevator control system in the tail section of
 this model aircraft.
     We believe much remains to be done to determine the cause of the Flight
 990 accident.  It is worthy to note NTSB investigations of the USAir Boeing
 737 crash near Pittsburgh in September 1994 and the United Airlines Boeing 737
 crash near Colorado Springs in March 1991 initially found no evidence of
 mechanical failure in either accident.  However, years later and after
 exhaustive and detailed testing and analysis, the NTSB concluded in both
 instances the Boeing 737 rudder control system in the tail of the aircraft
 caused these accidents.  As a result, the Boeing 737 flight control system was
 redesigned and retrofitted on existing Boeing 737 aircraft.  The possibility
 of a critical deficiency in the Boeing 767 elevator control system deserves
 the same level of examination and analysis.
     We urge the NTSB, the FAA and Boeing to continue to press their inquiry
 into what caused the loss of Flight 990 and to consider the possibility there
 might be an inherent flaw in the design and/or maintenance procedures of the
 Boeing 767 flight control system.
     We and the aviation industry owe it to the families of those aboard Flight
 990 -- and to the flying public -- to learn what caused this tragedy and to
 ensure that it never happens again."
 
 

SOURCE EgyptAir
    WASHINGTON, April 18 /PRNewswire/ -- The following is a statement by
 EgyptAir on the upcoming NTSB draft investigative report on EgyptAir
 Flight 990:
 
     "The National Transportation Safety Board's (NTSB) draft investigative
 report on the EgyptAir Flight 990 accident is expected to be completed soon.
 Upon receipt of the report, the Egyptian Civil Aviation Authority will have 60
 days to review the draft and offer comments prior to the publication of the
 final report.
     From the beginning, Egyptian investigators have maintained the flight
 control system aboard the Boeing 767 demands further testing and evaluation to
 confirm its safety and reliability.  This investigation and other Boeing 767
 problems have raised serious questions about the integrity of the elevator
 control system, which makes the aircraft go up and down.
     Recent incidents involving Boeing 767 flight control problems -- an
 American Airlines Boeing 767 which experienced jammed elevator controls
 approaching Paris, a Gulf Air Boeing 767 in Bahrain where a critical sheared
 rivet was found, and previous documented anomalies including an AeroMexico
 Boeing 767 that was found to have the same sheared rivets in two different
 areas of the elevator control system -- should give cause to both the NTSB and
 Boeing to further investigate the 767 flight control system.  The Federal
 Aviation Administration (FAA) issued airworthiness directives in August 2000
 and again in March 2001 that alerted operators of Boeing 767 aircraft about an
 "unsafe condition" with the elevator control system in the tail section of
 this model aircraft.
     We believe much remains to be done to determine the cause of the Flight
 990 accident.  It is worthy to note NTSB investigations of the USAir Boeing
 737 crash near Pittsburgh in September 1994 and the United Airlines Boeing 737
 crash near Colorado Springs in March 1991 initially found no evidence of
 mechanical failure in either accident.  However, years later and after
 exhaustive and detailed testing and analysis, the NTSB concluded in both
 instances the Boeing 737 rudder control system in the tail of the aircraft
 caused these accidents.  As a result, the Boeing 737 flight control system was
 redesigned and retrofitted on existing Boeing 737 aircraft.  The possibility
 of a critical deficiency in the Boeing 767 elevator control system deserves
 the same level of examination and analysis.
     We urge the NTSB, the FAA and Boeing to continue to press their inquiry
 into what caused the loss of Flight 990 and to consider the possibility there
 might be an inherent flaw in the design and/or maintenance procedures of the
 Boeing 767 flight control system.
     We and the aviation industry owe it to the families of those aboard Flight
 990 -- and to the flying public -- to learn what caused this tragedy and to
 ensure that it never happens again."
 
 SOURCE  EgyptAir