Statement by Martin Garbus, Attorney for The Mitchell Trusts -- Copyright Owner of 'Gone With the Wind'

Apr 20, 2001, 01:00 ET from The Mitchell Trusts

    ATLANTA, April 18 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- The following
 statement was issued today by The Mitchell Trusts:
 
     "This is a wonderful victory for the First Amendment," said Martin Garbus,
 attorney for The Mitchell Trusts -- copyright owner of "Gone With the Wind" --
 referring to a U.S. District Court of Atlanta ruling today prohibiting
 publisher Houghton Mifflin from publishing author Alice Randall's unauthorized
 sequel.   "Judge Pannell made specific mention to the fact that anyone is free
 to criticize or say anything they want about Ms. Mitchell or Gone With the
 Wind.  The question is not whether Ms. Randall can or cannot write a book,
 fiction or non-fiction that expresses the view that slavery was horrible, it
 is that too much was taken from Margaret Mitchell's book, including 15
 characters and remarkably similar plots.  In the end, the court found this to
 be a case of blatant plagiarism, and the law of copyright has prevailed."
 
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                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X11031707
 
 

SOURCE The Mitchell Trusts
    ATLANTA, April 18 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- The following
 statement was issued today by The Mitchell Trusts:
 
     "This is a wonderful victory for the First Amendment," said Martin Garbus,
 attorney for The Mitchell Trusts -- copyright owner of "Gone With the Wind" --
 referring to a U.S. District Court of Atlanta ruling today prohibiting
 publisher Houghton Mifflin from publishing author Alice Randall's unauthorized
 sequel.   "Judge Pannell made specific mention to the fact that anyone is free
 to criticize or say anything they want about Ms. Mitchell or Gone With the
 Wind.  The question is not whether Ms. Randall can or cannot write a book,
 fiction or non-fiction that expresses the view that slavery was horrible, it
 is that too much was taken from Margaret Mitchell's book, including 15
 characters and remarkably similar plots.  In the end, the court found this to
 be a case of blatant plagiarism, and the law of copyright has prevailed."
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X11031707
 
 SOURCE  The Mitchell Trusts