Statement by the Mitchell Trusts - Copyright Owner of 'Gone With the Wind'

Apr 04, 2001, 01:00 ET from The Mitchell Trusts Committee

     ATLANTA, April 4 /PRNewswire/ -- The following statement was issued today
 by the Mitchell Trusts Committee:
 
     "We are pleased with Judge Pannell's decision today to set an early
 hearing date of April 18th to hear arguments and review evidence regarding the
 Mitchell Trusts' claims against Houghton Mifflin Publishing and author Alice
 Randall.  We look forward to presenting our case, to confirming the validity
 of our legal position and protecting Ms. Mitchell's copyright," said Paul
 Anderson and Hal Clarke of the Mitchell Trusts Committee.
     "In recent days, there has been a lot said of this case," continued
 Anderson and Clarke.  "We wish to set the record straight regarding
 accusations made by Houghton Mifflin and Ms. Randall."
 
     1.  This is not a case about First Amendment rights of free speech.  While
         Ms. Randall is free to criticize Gone With the Wind for not portraying
         African-Americans in a different light, she is not free to use more
         than 15 characters -- including all of the major ones -- from the
         book.
 
     2.  Houghton Mifflin's publicity materials describe Ms. Randall's story as
         a "brilliant rejoinder" and a book that "gives a voice to those whom
         history has silenced."  Gone with the Wind is a work of fiction, not
         of history.  There is no such thing as a "correct" way to tell
         fiction.
 
     3.  The case against Ms. Randall's unauthorized sequel is about a property
         right and not a right of social commentary.  It is also about the
         Mitchell Trustee's fiduciary obligation to protect the copyright
         interests of Margaret Mitchell's work.
 
 

SOURCE The Mitchell Trusts Committee
     ATLANTA, April 4 /PRNewswire/ -- The following statement was issued today
 by the Mitchell Trusts Committee:
 
     "We are pleased with Judge Pannell's decision today to set an early
 hearing date of April 18th to hear arguments and review evidence regarding the
 Mitchell Trusts' claims against Houghton Mifflin Publishing and author Alice
 Randall.  We look forward to presenting our case, to confirming the validity
 of our legal position and protecting Ms. Mitchell's copyright," said Paul
 Anderson and Hal Clarke of the Mitchell Trusts Committee.
     "In recent days, there has been a lot said of this case," continued
 Anderson and Clarke.  "We wish to set the record straight regarding
 accusations made by Houghton Mifflin and Ms. Randall."
 
     1.  This is not a case about First Amendment rights of free speech.  While
         Ms. Randall is free to criticize Gone With the Wind for not portraying
         African-Americans in a different light, she is not free to use more
         than 15 characters -- including all of the major ones -- from the
         book.
 
     2.  Houghton Mifflin's publicity materials describe Ms. Randall's story as
         a "brilliant rejoinder" and a book that "gives a voice to those whom
         history has silenced."  Gone with the Wind is a work of fiction, not
         of history.  There is no such thing as a "correct" way to tell
         fiction.
 
     3.  The case against Ms. Randall's unauthorized sequel is about a property
         right and not a right of social commentary.  It is also about the
         Mitchell Trustee's fiduciary obligation to protect the copyright
         interests of Margaret Mitchell's work.
 
 SOURCE  The Mitchell Trusts Committee