Statement Made by Martin Garbus, Attorney for The Mitchell Trusts -- Copyright Owner of 'Gone With The Wind'

Apr 18, 2001, 01:00 ET from The Mitchell Trusts

    ATLANTA, April 18 /PRNewswire/ -- Statement provided after April 17
 hearing at U.S. District Court, Northern District of Georgia (Atlanta
 Division), presided over by the Honorable Judge Charles A. Pannell, Jr.:
 
     "We are pleased we had the opportunity to present our arguments before
 Judge Pannell today.  We know him to be an eminently fair judge and look
 forward to his ruling.
     "Going in, we knew our argument was based on sound copyright law.  We
 remain confident that the judge's ruling will reflect this.  We have
 maintained all along that this is solely a case of copyright law and not an
 issue of freedom of speech.
     "As I have argued here today, Congress instituted the law of copyright to
 provide protection for authors and other creative artists.  Therefore, it is
 imperative that we respect and abide by the law to the fullest degree.  In
 recent days we've heard a lot from well-known authors who have spoken in
 support of Ms. Randall's book.  Ironically, their arguments seek to weaken the
 copyright law under which their own works are protected.  I can sum up our
 argument this way: if Houghton Mifflin and Ms. Randall win this case, it will
 be the end of copyright law as we know it.  The law will be so weakened that
 it will no longer have the power to protect anyone."  -- Martin Garbus, Esq.
 
 

SOURCE The Mitchell Trusts
    ATLANTA, April 18 /PRNewswire/ -- Statement provided after April 17
 hearing at U.S. District Court, Northern District of Georgia (Atlanta
 Division), presided over by the Honorable Judge Charles A. Pannell, Jr.:
 
     "We are pleased we had the opportunity to present our arguments before
 Judge Pannell today.  We know him to be an eminently fair judge and look
 forward to his ruling.
     "Going in, we knew our argument was based on sound copyright law.  We
 remain confident that the judge's ruling will reflect this.  We have
 maintained all along that this is solely a case of copyright law and not an
 issue of freedom of speech.
     "As I have argued here today, Congress instituted the law of copyright to
 provide protection for authors and other creative artists.  Therefore, it is
 imperative that we respect and abide by the law to the fullest degree.  In
 recent days we've heard a lot from well-known authors who have spoken in
 support of Ms. Randall's book.  Ironically, their arguments seek to weaken the
 copyright law under which their own works are protected.  I can sum up our
 argument this way: if Houghton Mifflin and Ms. Randall win this case, it will
 be the end of copyright law as we know it.  The law will be so weakened that
 it will no longer have the power to protect anyone."  -- Martin Garbus, Esq.
 
 SOURCE  The Mitchell Trusts