Stories of Survival Highlight Brain Tumor Awareness Week

Apr 25, 2001, 01:00 ET from North American Brain Tumor Coalition

    WASHINGTON, April 25 /PRNewswire/ -- Because brain tumors are located at
 the control center for thought, emotion, and movement, their effects on an
 individual's physical and cognitive abilities can be devastating. But many
 brain tumor survivors say the experience has changed their lives and made them
 stronger.
     When David Hendricks was diagnosed with an astrocytoma in 1995 he was
 "shocked, confused and scared." But now, after a 1999 recurrence of his tumor,
 he's "determined to turn this experience into the best thing that's ever
 happened to me. I now see life issues much more clearly and can prioritize
 what's truly important in my life. This perspective probably wouldn't have
 been possible if I hadn't been diagnosed with a brain tumor."
     Lauren Kelley, now age 16, says "being diagnosed with a juvenile pilocytic
 astrocytoma at age 9 was scary, but I learned to be strong and deal with
 whatever life brings you. I knew all along that I wouldn't let this push me
 down and get the best of me."
     These are just two of the many faces of brain tumors that will be featured
 at this year's Brain Tumor Awareness Week activities in Washington D.C.
 May 6-12, 2001. Both David and Lauren will speak to key Members of Congress,
 health staffers and brain tumor advocates at a Capitol Hill luncheon on
 Tuesday May 8. Congressional Chaplain, Father Coughlin, will lead the group in
 remembering and honoring the thousands lost to brain tumors.
     Sponsored by the North American Brain Tumor Coalition (NABTC), Brain Tumor
 Awareness Week 2001 is the organization's fourth annual event and seeks to
 bring legislative attention to the need for increased biomedical research and
 access to clinical trials.
     The NABTC is a network of charitable organizations across the United
 States and Canada dedicated to eradicating brain tumors. Supported by its
 member organizations, the Coalition works to increase public awareness of the
 problem and advocates for increased research funding, health care and other
 issues affecting brain tumor patients. (In Canada, Brain Tumor Awareness Month
 is celebrated in October.)
     Brain Tumor Awareness Week 2001 Raising Awareness ... Inspiring Hope
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X78270254
 
 

SOURCE North American Brain Tumor Coalition
    WASHINGTON, April 25 /PRNewswire/ -- Because brain tumors are located at
 the control center for thought, emotion, and movement, their effects on an
 individual's physical and cognitive abilities can be devastating. But many
 brain tumor survivors say the experience has changed their lives and made them
 stronger.
     When David Hendricks was diagnosed with an astrocytoma in 1995 he was
 "shocked, confused and scared." But now, after a 1999 recurrence of his tumor,
 he's "determined to turn this experience into the best thing that's ever
 happened to me. I now see life issues much more clearly and can prioritize
 what's truly important in my life. This perspective probably wouldn't have
 been possible if I hadn't been diagnosed with a brain tumor."
     Lauren Kelley, now age 16, says "being diagnosed with a juvenile pilocytic
 astrocytoma at age 9 was scary, but I learned to be strong and deal with
 whatever life brings you. I knew all along that I wouldn't let this push me
 down and get the best of me."
     These are just two of the many faces of brain tumors that will be featured
 at this year's Brain Tumor Awareness Week activities in Washington D.C.
 May 6-12, 2001. Both David and Lauren will speak to key Members of Congress,
 health staffers and brain tumor advocates at a Capitol Hill luncheon on
 Tuesday May 8. Congressional Chaplain, Father Coughlin, will lead the group in
 remembering and honoring the thousands lost to brain tumors.
     Sponsored by the North American Brain Tumor Coalition (NABTC), Brain Tumor
 Awareness Week 2001 is the organization's fourth annual event and seeks to
 bring legislative attention to the need for increased biomedical research and
 access to clinical trials.
     The NABTC is a network of charitable organizations across the United
 States and Canada dedicated to eradicating brain tumors. Supported by its
 member organizations, the Coalition works to increase public awareness of the
 problem and advocates for increased research funding, health care and other
 issues affecting brain tumor patients. (In Canada, Brain Tumor Awareness Month
 is celebrated in October.)
     Brain Tumor Awareness Week 2001 Raising Awareness ... Inspiring Hope
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X78270254
 
 SOURCE  North American Brain Tumor Coalition