Sun Protection: Are Americans Getting the Message?

- Men's Health Survey Finds Surprisingly

Low Sunscreen Use Despite Widespread Warnings -



Apr 23, 2001, 01:00 ET from Men's Health/Banana Boat

    NEW YORK, April 23 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- For years
 we've heard it from our doctors, teachers, and the media: wearing sunscreen
 whenever we are outdoors is the only way to prevent sun damage and minimize
 the risk of skin cancer.  But according to a survey on sun protection and
 sports commissioned by Men's Health, almost half (48 percent) of people never
 or rarely wear sunscreen while exercising outdoors, despite the fact that over
 80 percent report participating in some form of physical activity outdoors
 each week.
     Conducted by Roper Starch Worldwide, the survey delved into Americans'
 attitudes and behaviors concerning incidental sun exposure, or unintentional
 sun exposure, for instance while playing sports outside or conducting everyday
 chores such as yard work or walking the dog.
     "Most people think of using sunscreen while at the beach or the pool, but
 don't realize that the sun doesn't care where you are -- if you're outside,
 you're exposed," says Brian Boye, an editor at Men's Health. "It seems
 obvious, yet only 17 percent of people polled always use sunscreen while
 participating in outdoor sports."
     One explanation could be that people simply underestimate the amount of
 time they spend in the sun.  In fact, more than 60 percent of people surveyed
 didn't realize that on average they are exposed to 19 hours of incidental sun
 exposure per week, an estimate provided by the National Safety Council.
     Other reasons those surveyed gave for not using sunscreen include "I sweat
 it off" (23 percent), "application is too messy" (16 percent), "greasiness
 interferes with my participation in activities" (16 percent), and "sunscreen
 products are inconvenient" (22 percent).  According to Boye, these people may
 simply be using the wrong sun protection products.
     "People need to make sunscreen part of their sports gear and their
 lifestyle -- just as you wouldn't ride a bicycle without a helmet, you
 shouldn't spend time outdoors without sunscreen," says Boye.  "When
 recommending sunscreen to my readers, I look for a product like Banana Boat's
 new Active Sport Quick-Dry Gel that goes on clean and won't come off when they
 sweat, so it won't get in the way of their game."
     The Men's Health survey on sun protection and outdoor sports was conducted
 by Roper Starch Worldwide.  Telephone interviews were conducted among a
 nationally representative sample of 1056 adults over the age of 18.
 Interviewing was conducted during the period of March 29th to April 1st 2001.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -- Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X44768487
 
 

SOURCE Men's Health/Banana Boat
    NEW YORK, April 23 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ -- For years
 we've heard it from our doctors, teachers, and the media: wearing sunscreen
 whenever we are outdoors is the only way to prevent sun damage and minimize
 the risk of skin cancer.  But according to a survey on sun protection and
 sports commissioned by Men's Health, almost half (48 percent) of people never
 or rarely wear sunscreen while exercising outdoors, despite the fact that over
 80 percent report participating in some form of physical activity outdoors
 each week.
     Conducted by Roper Starch Worldwide, the survey delved into Americans'
 attitudes and behaviors concerning incidental sun exposure, or unintentional
 sun exposure, for instance while playing sports outside or conducting everyday
 chores such as yard work or walking the dog.
     "Most people think of using sunscreen while at the beach or the pool, but
 don't realize that the sun doesn't care where you are -- if you're outside,
 you're exposed," says Brian Boye, an editor at Men's Health. "It seems
 obvious, yet only 17 percent of people polled always use sunscreen while
 participating in outdoor sports."
     One explanation could be that people simply underestimate the amount of
 time they spend in the sun.  In fact, more than 60 percent of people surveyed
 didn't realize that on average they are exposed to 19 hours of incidental sun
 exposure per week, an estimate provided by the National Safety Council.
     Other reasons those surveyed gave for not using sunscreen include "I sweat
 it off" (23 percent), "application is too messy" (16 percent), "greasiness
 interferes with my participation in activities" (16 percent), and "sunscreen
 products are inconvenient" (22 percent).  According to Boye, these people may
 simply be using the wrong sun protection products.
     "People need to make sunscreen part of their sports gear and their
 lifestyle -- just as you wouldn't ride a bicycle without a helmet, you
 shouldn't spend time outdoors without sunscreen," says Boye.  "When
 recommending sunscreen to my readers, I look for a product like Banana Boat's
 new Active Sport Quick-Dry Gel that goes on clean and won't come off when they
 sweat, so it won't get in the way of their game."
     The Men's Health survey on sun protection and outdoor sports was conducted
 by Roper Starch Worldwide.  Telephone interviews were conducted among a
 nationally representative sample of 1056 adults over the age of 18.
 Interviewing was conducted during the period of March 29th to April 1st 2001.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -- Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X44768487
 
 SOURCE  Men's Health/Banana Boat