Survey Shows Over 50% of Parents Worry Kids Might Try Smoking, Nearly All Think Schools Need to Teach Kids About Nicotine Addiction

Apr 23, 2001, 01:00 ET from BTIO Educational Products, Inc.

    EAU CLAIRE, Wis., April 23 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ --
 Despite the myriad of anti-smoking campaigns and the millions of dollars being
 spent to warn children of the dangers of smoking and nicotine addiction,
 today's parents still worry that their children might try smoking, according
 to a nationwide survey.  These same parents overwhelmingly think that schools
 have a major role to play in making children aware of the nature and danger of
 nicotine addiction.
     In a recent poll of parents of children between the ages of six and 17,
 conducted by the independent research organization Market Facts TeleNation for
 BTIO Educational Products, Inc. (BTIO), nearly 55 percent of those surveyed
 said they are "very" (31.8 percent) to "somewhat" (23 percent) concerned or
 worried that their child or children might try smoking now or sometime in the
 future.
     When asked whether schools should be involved in making children aware of
 the dangers of smoking and nicotine addiction, over 90 percent of parents
 participating in the survey said they believe schools should be involved and
 almost two-thirds of respondents said schools should be "very involved" and
 that nicotine addiction education should be part of classroom curriculum.  The
 survey was conducted over the first weekend in April with 308 parent
 respondents coast to coast.
     "Results of this survey show that, despite all of the anti-smoking
 campaigns, parents continue to be very concerned about the risk that their
 children may try smoking and become addicted to nicotine," said Mary Jurmain,
 Chief Executive Officer and President of the survey's sponsoring organization,
 BTIO Educational Products, Inc. (BTIO).
     BTIO is a firm that provides educational products and supporting
 curriculum to help students make informed choices about serious life matters
 like smoking.  BTIO just launched a new product for classroom use called the
 NICoteen(TM) Program that features a small cigarette pack sized device that
 demands students "smoke" 10 or more times a day.
     "If you have a comprehensive anti-smoking program, but studies show it
 doesn't produce any long-term effect, then it's just not a success," Jurmain
 contends.  "We need programs that will come to have a demonstrated impact on
 behavior."
     In order to bring about that behavioral impact, BTIO has created the
 NICoteen(TM) Pack smoking simulator and curriculum.  During each simulated
 smoke, students must speak one of seven pre-approved voice recognition
 messages into the pack.  The Pack then tells students such things as how much
 time smoking has taken from their lives and how much money they're spending on
 cigarettes.  The simulated lesson drives home again and again that they are
 "not in control" of their lives when they become addicted to nicotine.
     "While smoking in the adult population has remained steady, it has
 actually been increasing among teens and preteens," Jurmain said.  "The 2001
 Surgeon General's Report on Women and Smoking, for example, is a chilling
 document.  It shows that 30 percent of high school girls reported smoking in
 the month the study was conducted.  This is very significant because, as the
 Report notes, nearly all women smokers begin in high school.  The frightening
 connection, as the Report states, is that 68,000 women now die each year from
 lung cancer, 50 percent more than die of breast cancer.
     "The bottom line, as our survey affirms, is that all of us involved in
 raising and educating the youth of this country, still have a lot of work to
 do," Jurmain concluded.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -- Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X24982487
 
 

SOURCE BTIO Educational Products, Inc.
    EAU CLAIRE, Wis., April 23 /PRNewswire Interactive News Release/ --
 Despite the myriad of anti-smoking campaigns and the millions of dollars being
 spent to warn children of the dangers of smoking and nicotine addiction,
 today's parents still worry that their children might try smoking, according
 to a nationwide survey.  These same parents overwhelmingly think that schools
 have a major role to play in making children aware of the nature and danger of
 nicotine addiction.
     In a recent poll of parents of children between the ages of six and 17,
 conducted by the independent research organization Market Facts TeleNation for
 BTIO Educational Products, Inc. (BTIO), nearly 55 percent of those surveyed
 said they are "very" (31.8 percent) to "somewhat" (23 percent) concerned or
 worried that their child or children might try smoking now or sometime in the
 future.
     When asked whether schools should be involved in making children aware of
 the dangers of smoking and nicotine addiction, over 90 percent of parents
 participating in the survey said they believe schools should be involved and
 almost two-thirds of respondents said schools should be "very involved" and
 that nicotine addiction education should be part of classroom curriculum.  The
 survey was conducted over the first weekend in April with 308 parent
 respondents coast to coast.
     "Results of this survey show that, despite all of the anti-smoking
 campaigns, parents continue to be very concerned about the risk that their
 children may try smoking and become addicted to nicotine," said Mary Jurmain,
 Chief Executive Officer and President of the survey's sponsoring organization,
 BTIO Educational Products, Inc. (BTIO).
     BTIO is a firm that provides educational products and supporting
 curriculum to help students make informed choices about serious life matters
 like smoking.  BTIO just launched a new product for classroom use called the
 NICoteen(TM) Program that features a small cigarette pack sized device that
 demands students "smoke" 10 or more times a day.
     "If you have a comprehensive anti-smoking program, but studies show it
 doesn't produce any long-term effect, then it's just not a success," Jurmain
 contends.  "We need programs that will come to have a demonstrated impact on
 behavior."
     In order to bring about that behavioral impact, BTIO has created the
 NICoteen(TM) Pack smoking simulator and curriculum.  During each simulated
 smoke, students must speak one of seven pre-approved voice recognition
 messages into the pack.  The Pack then tells students such things as how much
 time smoking has taken from their lives and how much money they're spending on
 cigarettes.  The simulated lesson drives home again and again that they are
 "not in control" of their lives when they become addicted to nicotine.
     "While smoking in the adult population has remained steady, it has
 actually been increasing among teens and preteens," Jurmain said.  "The 2001
 Surgeon General's Report on Women and Smoking, for example, is a chilling
 document.  It shows that 30 percent of high school girls reported smoking in
 the month the study was conducted.  This is very significant because, as the
 Report notes, nearly all women smokers begin in high school.  The frightening
 connection, as the Report states, is that 68,000 women now die each year from
 lung cancer, 50 percent more than die of breast cancer.
     "The bottom line, as our survey affirms, is that all of us involved in
 raising and educating the youth of this country, still have a lot of work to
 do," Jurmain concluded.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -- Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X24982487
 
 SOURCE  BTIO Educational Products, Inc.