Taubman Centers and TIA Release First Ever Survey On U.S. Shopping and Travel Experience

Apr 26, 2001, 01:00 ET from Taubman Centers Inc. and Travel Industry Association of America

    WASHINGTON, April 26 /PRNewswire/ -- Shopping is an integral and,
 arguably, the most important element of the travel experience for U.S.
 residents who travel and shop, according to a first-ever comprehensive
 research study of the relationship between travel and shopping.  The study,
 The Shopping Traveler, was conducted by the Travel Industry Association of
 America (TIA) and commissioned by Taubman Centers Inc. (NYSE:   TCO), a real
 estate investment trust that develops and manages shopping centers throughout
 the U.S.
     Based on a representative sample survey of 1,000 U.S. adults who took at
 least one trip in 2000, the study indicates that more than half (51%) of all
 shopping travelers say that shopping was the primary or secondary purpose of
 one or more of their trips taken last year.  Travelers who shop spend a lot on
 their purchases -- an average of $333 during their trips, with 22 percent
 spending more than $500.  The study also disproves an old stereotype regarding
 what people buy while on trips -- according to the survey, shopping travelers
 most often spend money on clothes or shoes for themselves or others (77%),
 rather than on souvenirs.  TIA estimates that travelers spent approximately
 $37.3 billion*, in total, on retail trade purchases while shopping in 1999,
 the latest data available.
     "These and other findings in the survey clearly illustrate the essential
 ingredient that shopping is in the travel experience.  Indeed, the report
 confirms a change in the way this relationship has been perceived," commented
 William S. Norman, president and CEO of the Travel Industry Association of
 America.  "As recently as the mid-1980s, the so-called 'traditional' travel
 industry thought of itself as a competitor, not a partner, of retail outlets,
 shopping centers and malls for consumer dollars.  Now, it can be submitted
 that shopping is a cause, not an effect, of the decision to travel and the
 travel experience."
     The joint Taubman Centers and TIA report validates what has been, for some
 time, a basic tenet of marketing wisdom among the businesses and merchants who
 furnish the shopping experience.
     "We've recognized the link between shopping and tourism for years," said
 Karen Mac Donald, director of communications for Taubman.  "We have actively
 and strategically supported and contributed to the travel-and-shopping
 experience by providing shopping centers that feature some of the world's most
 well-known and unique retailers, restaurants and entertainment venues, and
 this survey shows how important shopping is to today's overall travel and
 vacation experience."
 
                      Items Purchased on Most Recent Trip
     Clothing or shoes                                             77%
     Souvenirs                                                     49%
     Books or music                                                42%
     Specialty foods/beverage items                                41%
     Kid's toys                                                    39%
     Items/Crafts by local pop. or unique to destination           37%
     Jewelry or accessories                                        36%
     Home accessories or furniture                                 23%
     Home electronics                                              16%
     Sports equipment                                              15%
     Camera and/or camera equipment                                15%
     Artwork                                                       15%
     Luggage                                                        9%
     Camping equipment                                              7%
 
     The release of the study comes at a key time for both industries, as they
 prepare for the peak spring/summer travel and shopping seasons.  Also next
 week, the country commemorates the 18th Annual National Tourism Week (May 6-
 12).
 
     The Shopping Traveler Report Highlights
     *  Shopping continues to be the most popular of common activities for U.S.
 travelers.  About 91 million people, or 63 percent of travelers in 2000,
 included shopping as an activity on a trip.  Because people can go shopping on
 more than one trip away from home, TIA estimates that over 335 million U.S.
 person-trips include shopping (one person-trip equals one person on one trip).
     *  Travelers most often turn to people they know and hotels where they are
 staying to obtain information about shopping.  Interestingly, 59 percent of
 shopping travelers obtained information about shopping areas from friends,
 family or co-workers.  Hotels were another popular source with travelers
 getting information from in-room maps, brochures, a TV or the hotel concierge
 (25%).  Fewer travelers used travel guides, books or magazines (20%), the
 Internet (16%), a newspaper travel section (12%) and/or a destination brochure
 ordered from a local tourism organization (10%).
     *  Shopping is a top priority.  Half (51%) of shopping travelers say that
 shopping was the primary or secondary purpose of one or more trips taken in
 the past year.  Most travelers (87%) say that their most recent trip that
 included shopping was for leisure purposes.  And nearly four in ten shopping
 travelers (39%) agree that a trip is not complete without going shopping
 during the trip.
     *  One in five shopping travelers spend $500 or more on purchases during
 their trip.  On average, shopping travelers report spending $333, in total, on
 purchases on their most recent trip.  Nearly one in five (22%) of shopping
 travelers spent $500 or more on purchases.  Interestingly, on average, men
 outspend women ($349 vs. $319) while shopping on a trip.
     *  Travelers who shop want to visit different, rather than familiar,
 stores.  Most (73%) traveling shoppers want to shop at stores they do not have
 in their home city or town.  This is not surprising considering that most
 shopping travelers are on leisure trips.  Over half (53%) of traveling
 shoppers also say they go shopping on trips in order to find items that
 represent the destination they are visiting.
     *  Traditional enclosed shopping centers or malls are the most popular
 places to shop on a trip.  The most popular place to shop on trips is
 traditional enclosed shopping centers or malls (62%).  Half shop at major
 downtown shopping districts or outdoor 'main street' shopping areas (53%)
 and/or strip malls or plazas that are not enclosed (48%).  Four in ten (38%)
 of shopping travelers shop at outlet centers.
     *  Shopping travelers are likely to be Baby Boomers and have higher-than-
 average household incomes.  Shopping travelers tend to be Baby Boomers, aged
 35 to 54 (42%).  One-third are Generation X or Y'ers, aged 18 to 34 (35%) and
 23 percent are Matures, aged 55 or older.  Over half are married (56%) and
 most are employed (69%).  Four in ten have children at home (41%).  Their
 average annual household income is $69,400.
 
     TIA is the national, non-profit organization representing all components
 of the $584 billion travel industry.  TIA's mission is to represent the whole
 of the US travel industry to promote and facilitate increased travel to and
 within the United States.
     An active member of TIA, Taubman Centers Inc., a real estate investment
 trust, owns, develops, acquires and manages regional shopping centers
 nationally.  Taubman Centers currently owns and/or manages 28 urban and
 suburban regional and super regional shopping centers in 12 states.  Taubman
 Centers is headquartered in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan.
 
     *Preliminary figure. Consists of traveler spending on retail trade
 purchases including gifts for others, clothing, souvenirs, personal services,
 medicine, cosmetics, and other items of this nature.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X53011668
 
 

SOURCE Taubman Centers Inc. and Travel Industry Association of America
    WASHINGTON, April 26 /PRNewswire/ -- Shopping is an integral and,
 arguably, the most important element of the travel experience for U.S.
 residents who travel and shop, according to a first-ever comprehensive
 research study of the relationship between travel and shopping.  The study,
 The Shopping Traveler, was conducted by the Travel Industry Association of
 America (TIA) and commissioned by Taubman Centers Inc. (NYSE:   TCO), a real
 estate investment trust that develops and manages shopping centers throughout
 the U.S.
     Based on a representative sample survey of 1,000 U.S. adults who took at
 least one trip in 2000, the study indicates that more than half (51%) of all
 shopping travelers say that shopping was the primary or secondary purpose of
 one or more of their trips taken last year.  Travelers who shop spend a lot on
 their purchases -- an average of $333 during their trips, with 22 percent
 spending more than $500.  The study also disproves an old stereotype regarding
 what people buy while on trips -- according to the survey, shopping travelers
 most often spend money on clothes or shoes for themselves or others (77%),
 rather than on souvenirs.  TIA estimates that travelers spent approximately
 $37.3 billion*, in total, on retail trade purchases while shopping in 1999,
 the latest data available.
     "These and other findings in the survey clearly illustrate the essential
 ingredient that shopping is in the travel experience.  Indeed, the report
 confirms a change in the way this relationship has been perceived," commented
 William S. Norman, president and CEO of the Travel Industry Association of
 America.  "As recently as the mid-1980s, the so-called 'traditional' travel
 industry thought of itself as a competitor, not a partner, of retail outlets,
 shopping centers and malls for consumer dollars.  Now, it can be submitted
 that shopping is a cause, not an effect, of the decision to travel and the
 travel experience."
     The joint Taubman Centers and TIA report validates what has been, for some
 time, a basic tenet of marketing wisdom among the businesses and merchants who
 furnish the shopping experience.
     "We've recognized the link between shopping and tourism for years," said
 Karen Mac Donald, director of communications for Taubman.  "We have actively
 and strategically supported and contributed to the travel-and-shopping
 experience by providing shopping centers that feature some of the world's most
 well-known and unique retailers, restaurants and entertainment venues, and
 this survey shows how important shopping is to today's overall travel and
 vacation experience."
 
                      Items Purchased on Most Recent Trip
     Clothing or shoes                                             77%
     Souvenirs                                                     49%
     Books or music                                                42%
     Specialty foods/beverage items                                41%
     Kid's toys                                                    39%
     Items/Crafts by local pop. or unique to destination           37%
     Jewelry or accessories                                        36%
     Home accessories or furniture                                 23%
     Home electronics                                              16%
     Sports equipment                                              15%
     Camera and/or camera equipment                                15%
     Artwork                                                       15%
     Luggage                                                        9%
     Camping equipment                                              7%
 
     The release of the study comes at a key time for both industries, as they
 prepare for the peak spring/summer travel and shopping seasons.  Also next
 week, the country commemorates the 18th Annual National Tourism Week (May 6-
 12).
 
     The Shopping Traveler Report Highlights
     *  Shopping continues to be the most popular of common activities for U.S.
 travelers.  About 91 million people, or 63 percent of travelers in 2000,
 included shopping as an activity on a trip.  Because people can go shopping on
 more than one trip away from home, TIA estimates that over 335 million U.S.
 person-trips include shopping (one person-trip equals one person on one trip).
     *  Travelers most often turn to people they know and hotels where they are
 staying to obtain information about shopping.  Interestingly, 59 percent of
 shopping travelers obtained information about shopping areas from friends,
 family or co-workers.  Hotels were another popular source with travelers
 getting information from in-room maps, brochures, a TV or the hotel concierge
 (25%).  Fewer travelers used travel guides, books or magazines (20%), the
 Internet (16%), a newspaper travel section (12%) and/or a destination brochure
 ordered from a local tourism organization (10%).
     *  Shopping is a top priority.  Half (51%) of shopping travelers say that
 shopping was the primary or secondary purpose of one or more trips taken in
 the past year.  Most travelers (87%) say that their most recent trip that
 included shopping was for leisure purposes.  And nearly four in ten shopping
 travelers (39%) agree that a trip is not complete without going shopping
 during the trip.
     *  One in five shopping travelers spend $500 or more on purchases during
 their trip.  On average, shopping travelers report spending $333, in total, on
 purchases on their most recent trip.  Nearly one in five (22%) of shopping
 travelers spent $500 or more on purchases.  Interestingly, on average, men
 outspend women ($349 vs. $319) while shopping on a trip.
     *  Travelers who shop want to visit different, rather than familiar,
 stores.  Most (73%) traveling shoppers want to shop at stores they do not have
 in their home city or town.  This is not surprising considering that most
 shopping travelers are on leisure trips.  Over half (53%) of traveling
 shoppers also say they go shopping on trips in order to find items that
 represent the destination they are visiting.
     *  Traditional enclosed shopping centers or malls are the most popular
 places to shop on a trip.  The most popular place to shop on trips is
 traditional enclosed shopping centers or malls (62%).  Half shop at major
 downtown shopping districts or outdoor 'main street' shopping areas (53%)
 and/or strip malls or plazas that are not enclosed (48%).  Four in ten (38%)
 of shopping travelers shop at outlet centers.
     *  Shopping travelers are likely to be Baby Boomers and have higher-than-
 average household incomes.  Shopping travelers tend to be Baby Boomers, aged
 35 to 54 (42%).  One-third are Generation X or Y'ers, aged 18 to 34 (35%) and
 23 percent are Matures, aged 55 or older.  Over half are married (56%) and
 most are employed (69%).  Four in ten have children at home (41%).  Their
 average annual household income is $69,400.
 
     TIA is the national, non-profit organization representing all components
 of the $584 billion travel industry.  TIA's mission is to represent the whole
 of the US travel industry to promote and facilitate increased travel to and
 within the United States.
     An active member of TIA, Taubman Centers Inc., a real estate investment
 trust, owns, develops, acquires and manages regional shopping centers
 nationally.  Taubman Centers currently owns and/or manages 28 urban and
 suburban regional and super regional shopping centers in 12 states.  Taubman
 Centers is headquartered in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan.
 
     *Preliminary figure. Consists of traveler spending on retail trade
 purchases including gifts for others, clothing, souvenirs, personal services,
 medicine, cosmetics, and other items of this nature.
 
                     MAKE YOUR OPINION COUNT -  Click Here
                http://tbutton.prnewswire.com/prn/11690X53011668
 
 SOURCE  Taubman Centers Inc. and Travel Industry Association of America

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